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Family Change and Diversity in Family Change Structure
Family Change and PTSD
Family Change and the Changing Family
Family Change and Trauma
Family Change and New Families
Family Change and Family Systems and Independence
Family Change and Emotional Interdependence

Psychological

and Physiological

Trauma Research

 

 

Seize Your Journeys

 

_______________________

Traumatic stress is found in many competent, healthy, strong, good people.  No one can completely protect themselves from traumatic experiences.  Many people have long-lasting problems following exposure to trauma.  Up to 8% of persons will have PTSD at some time in their lives. People who react to traumas are not going crazy.  What is happening to them is part of a set of common symptoms and problems that are connected with being in a traumatic situation, and thus, is a normal reaction to abnormal events and experiences.  Having symptoms after a traumatic event is NOT a sign of personal weakness.  Given exposure to a trauma that is bad enough, probably all people would develop PTSD.

By understanding trauma symptoms better, a person can become less fearful of them and better able to manage them. By recognizing the effects of trauma and knowing more about symptoms, a person will be better able to decide about getting treatment.

_______________________

 

Secure Attachments as a Defense Against Trauma

 “All people mature and thrive in a social context that has profound effects on how they cope with life’s stresses.  Particularly early in life, the social context plays a critical role in fuffering an individual against stressful situations, and in building the psychological and biological capacities to deal with further stresses.  The primary function of parents can be thought of as helping children modulate their arousal by attuned and well-timed provision of playing, feeding, comforting, touching, looking, cleaning, and resting—in short, by teaching them skills that will gradually help them modulate their own arousal.  Secure attachment bonds serve as primary defenses against trauma-induced psychopathology in both children and adults (Finkelhor & Browne, 1984).  In children who have been exposed to severe stressors, the quality of the parental bond is probably the single most important determinant of long-term damage (McFarlane, 1988).”  van der Kolk, Bessel, Alexander C. McFarlane, and Lars Weisaeth, eds.  1996. Traumatic stress: The effects of overwhelming experience on mind, body, and society.  New York and London: Guilford Press. .p. 185

 

DID-PTSD-EMDR

Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID)

"The essential feature of Dissociative identity Disorder is the presence of two or more distinct identities or personality states (Criterion A) that recurrently take control of behavior (Criterion B).  There is an inability to recall important personal information, the extent of which is too great to be explained by ordinary forgetfulness (Criterion C).  The disturbance is not due tot eh direct physiological effects of a substance or a general medical condition (Condition D.).  In children, the symptoms cannot be attributed to imaginary playmates or other fantasy play.

Dissociative Identity Disorder reflects a failure to integrate various aspects of identity, memory, and consciousness.  Each personality state may be experienced as if it has a distinct personal history, self-image, and identity, including a separate name.  Usually there is a primary identity that carries the individual's given name and is passive, dependent, guilty, and depressed.  The alternate identities frequently have different names and characteristics that contrast with the primary identity (e.g., are hostile, controlling, and self-destructive).  Particular identities may emerge in specific circumstances and may differ in reported age and gender, vocabulary, general knowledge, or predominant affect.  Alternate identities are experienced as taking control in sequence, ore at the expense of the other, and may deny knowledge of one another, be critical of one another, or appear to be in open conflict.  Occasionally, one or more powerful identities allocate time to the others.  Aggressive or hostile identities may at times interrupt activities or place the others in uncomfortable situations.

Individuals with this disorder experience frequent gaps in memory for personal history, both remote and recent.  The amnesia is frequently asymmetrical.  The more passive identities tend to have more constricted memories, whereas the more hostile, controlling, or "protector" identities have more complete memories.  An identity that is not in control may nonetheless gain access to consciousness by producing auditory or visual hallucinations (e.g., a voice giving instructions).  Evidence of amnesia may be uncovered by reports from others who have witnessed behavior that is disavowed by the individual or by the individual's own discoveries (e.g., finding items of clothing at home that the individual cannot remember having bought).  There may be loss of memory not only for recurrent periods of time, but also an overall loss of biographical memory for some extended period of childhood, adolescence, or even adulthood.  Transitions among identities are often triggered by psychosocial stress.  The time required to switch from one identity to another is usually a matter of seconds, but, less frequently, may b gradual.  Behavior that may be frequently associated with identity switches include rapid blinking, facial changes, changes in voice or demeanor, or disruption in the individual's train of thoughts.  The number of identities reported ranges from 2 to more than 100.  Half of reported cases include the individuals with 10 or fewer identities."

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. 2000.  4th ed. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Association.

PTSD, DID, and EMDR

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

"The essential feature of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder us the development of characteristic symptoms following exposure to an extreme traumatic stressor involving direct personal experience of an event that involves actual or threatened death or serious injury, or other threat to one's physical integrity; or witnessing an event that involves death, injury, or a threat to the physical integrity of another person; or learning about unexpected or violent death, serious harm, or threat of death or injury experienced by a family member or other close associate (Criteria A1).  The person's response to the event must involve intense fear, helplessness, or horror (or in children, the response must involve disorganized or agitated behavior) (Criterion A2).  The characteristic symptoms resulting from the exposure to the extreme trauma include persistent reexperiencing of the traumatic event (Criterion E), and the disturbance must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning (Criterion F).

Traumatic events that are experienced directly include, but are not limited to, military combat, violent personal assault (sexual assault, physical attack, robbery, mugging), being kidnapped, being taken hostage, terrorist attack, torture, incarceration as a prisoner of war or in a concentration camp, natural or manmade disasters, severe automobile accidents, or being diagnosed with a life-threatening illness.  For children, sexually traumatic events may include developmentally inappropriate sexual experiences without threatened or actual violence or injury.  Witnessed events include, but are not limited to, observing the serious injury or unnatural death of another person due to violent assault, accident, war, or disaster or unexpectedly witnessing a dead body or body parts.  Events experienced by others that are learned about include, but are not limited to, violent personal assault, serious accident, or serious injury experienced y a family member or a close friend; learning about the sudden, unexpected death of a family member or a close friend; or learning that one's child has a life threatening disease.  The disorder may be especially sever or long lasting when the stressor is of human design (e.g., torture, rape). the likelihood of developing this disorder may increase as the intensity of and physical proximity to the stressor increase.

The traumatic event can be reexperienced in various ways.  Commonly the person has recurrent and intrusive recollections of the event (Criterion B1) or recurrent distressing dreams during which the event can be replayed or otherwise represented (Criterion B2). In rare instances, the person experiences dissociative states that last from a few seconds to several hours, or even days, during which components of the event are relived and the person behaves as though experiencing the event at that moment (Criterion B3).  These episodes, often referred to as "flashbacks," are typically brief but can be associated with prolonged distress and heightened arousal.  Intense psychological distress (Criterion B4) or physiological reactivity (Criterion B5) often occurs when the person is exposed to triggering events that resemble or symbolize an aspect of the traumatic event (e.g., anniversaries of the traumatic event; cold, snowy weather or uniformed guards for survivors of death camps in cold climates; hot, humid weather for combat veterans of the South Pacific; entering any elevator for an woman who was reaped in an elevator).

Stimuli associated with the trauma are persistently avoided.  The person commonly makes deliberate efforts to avoid thoughts, feelings, or conversations about the traumatic event (Criterion C1) and to avoid activities, situations, or people who around recollections of it (Criterion C2).  This avoidance of reminders may include amnesia for an important aspect of the traumatic event (Criterion C3).  Diminished responsiveness to the external work, referred to as "psychic numbing" or "emotional anesthesia," usually begins soon after the traumatic event.  The individual may complain of having markedly diminished interest or participation in previously enjoyed activities (Criterion C4), of feeling detached or estranged from other people (Criterion C5), or of having markedly reduced ability to feel emotions (especially those associated with intimacy, tenderness and sexuality) (Criterion C6).  The individual may have a sense of a foreshortened future (e.g., not expecting to have a career, marriage, children, or a normal life span) (Criterion C7).

The individual has persistent symptoms of anxiety or increased arousal that were not present before the trauma.  these symptoms may include difficulty falling or staying asleep that may be to recurrent nightmares during which the traumatic event is relived (Criterion D1), hypervigilance (Criterion D4), and exaggerated startle response (Criterion D5).  Some individuals report irritability or outburst of anger (Criterion D2) or difficulty concentrating or completing tasks (Criterion D3)."

 

EMDR

Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing

"Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)1 integrates elements of many effective psychotherapies in structured protocols that are designed to maximize treatment effects. These include psychodynamic, cognitive behavioral, interpersonal, experiential, and body-centered therapies2. EMDR is an information processing therapy and uses an eight phase approach.

During EMDR1 the client attends to past and present experiences in brief sequential doses while simultaneously focusing on an external stimulus. Then the client is instructed to let new material become the focus of the next set of dual attention. This sequence of dual attention and personal association is repeated many times in the session.

Eight Phases of Treatment

The first phase is a history taking session during which the therapist assesses the client's readiness for EMDR and develops a treatment plan. Client and therapist identify possible targets for EMDR processing. These include recent distressing events, current situations that elicit emotional disturbance, related historical incidents, and the development of specific skills and behaviors that will be needed by the client in future situations.

During the second phase of treatment, the therapist ensures that the client has adequate methods of handling emotional distress and good coping skills, and that the client is in a relatively stable state. If further stabilization is required, or if additional skills are needed, therapy focuses on providing these. The client is then able to use stress reducing techniques whenever necessary, during or between sessions. However, one goal is not to need these techniques once therapy is complete.

In phase three through six, a target is identified and processed using EMDR procedures. These involve the client identifying the most vivid visual image related to the memory (if available), a negative belief about self, related emotions and body sensations. The client also identifies a preferred positive belief. The validity of the positive belief is rated, as is the intensity of the negative emotions.

After this, the client is instructed to focus on the image, negative thought, and body sensations while simultaneously moving his/her eyes back and forth following the therapist's fingers as they move across his/her field of vision for 20-30 seconds or more, depending upon the need of the client. Athough eye movements are the most commonly used external stimulus, therapists often use auditory tones, tapping, or other types of tactile stimulation. The kind of dual attention and the length of each set is customized to the need of the client. The client is instructed to just notice whatever happens. After this, the clinician instructs the client to let his/her mind go blank and to notice whatever thought, feeling, image, memory, or sensation comes to mind. Depending upon the client's report the clinician will facilitate the next focus of attention. In most cases a client-directed association process is encouraged. This is repeated numerous times throughout the session. If the client becomes distressed or has difficulty with the process, the therapist follows established procedures to help the client resume processing. When the client reports no distress related to the targeted memory, the clinician asks him/her to think of the preferred positive belief that was identified at the beginning of the session, or a better one if it has emerged, and to focus on the incident, while simultaneously engaging in the eye movements. After several sets, clients generally report increased confidence in this positive belief. The therapist checks with the client regarding body sensations. If there are negative sensations, these are processed as above. If there are positive sensations, they are further enhanced.

In phase seven, closure, the therapist asks the client to keep a journal during the week to document any related material that may arise and reminds the client of the self-calming activities that were mastered in phase two.

The next session begins with phase eight, re-evaluation of the previous work, and of progress since the previous session. EMDR treatment ensures processing of all related historical events, current incidents that elicit distress, and future scenarios that will require different responses. The overall goal is produce the most comprehensive and profound treatment effects in the shortest period of time, while simultaneously maintaining a stable client within a balanced system.

After EMDR processing, clients generally report that the emotional distress related to the memory has been eliminated, or greatly decreased, and that they have gained important cognitive insights. Importantly, these emotional and cognitive changes usually result in spontaneous behavioral and personal change, which are further enhanced with standard EMDR procedures." www.emdr.com

 1Shapiro, F. (2001). Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing: Basic Principles, Protocols and Procedures (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.

2Shapiro, F. (2002). EMDR as an Integrative Psychotherapy Approach: Experts of Diverse Orientations Explore the Paradigm Prism. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association Books.

 

 

 

 

Family Change

 

Family Change and Trauma

 

Title: Family intervention in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorders.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Saldanha, D.

Source/Citation: Journal of Projective Psychology & Mental Health; Vol 9(1) Jan 2002, India: Somatic Inkblot Society; 2002, 57-61

Abstract/Review/Citation: Details the cases of 6 military personnel (aged 17-38 yrs) who, after sustaining various traumas, met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A treatment protocol was used that incorporated family members whenever possible. Five families actively cooperated in a trauma-based cognitive framework and insight-oriented psychotherapy to effect on attitudinal change. Five out of the 6 PTSD cases showed significant improvement with the intervention of family members. The 6th case illustrates how incorporating a family member in treatment could have helped prevent chronicity of PTSD. Finally, the significance of the role of families in the care of the mentally ill is discussed. ========================================

 

Title: Imagery rescripting within cognitive behavior therapy for bulimia nervosa: An illustrative case report.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Ohanian, Vartouhi

Source/Citation: International Journal of Eating Disorders; Vol 31(3) Apr 2002, US: John Wiley & Sons; 2002, 352-357

Abstract/Review/Citation: This case report describes the use of imagery rescripting as an adjunct to cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa. The patient was a 22-yr-old woman with a 6-yr history of diagnosable eating problems with no comorbid diagnosis. She had a history of emotional abuse by her family. The single session of imagery rescripting was aimed at effecting change in the core beliefs that were hypothesized to result from that emotional abuse, and hence in the associated bulimic psychopathology.  While 8 sessions of convention CBT reduced symptom behaviors by 50%, 1 session of imagery rescripting led to an almost complete cessation of the remaining binge-purge behaviors. This effect was maintained at 14 wks post-imagery.  Imagery rescripting appears to be a valuable adjunct to conventional CBT in working with cases where there is an early history of trauma. Implications for treatment of eating disorders using this technique are considered, and relevant research designs are discussed. ========================================

 

Title: An art therapy group for children traumatized by parental violence and separation.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Kozlowska, Kasia; Hanney, Lesley

Source/Citation: Clinical Child Psychology & Psychiatry; Vol 6(1) Jan 2001, England: Sage Publications Ltd; 2001, 49-78

Abstract/Review/Citation: Describes the treatment of five traumatized children (aged 4-8 yrs) using adjunctive group art therapy, and reviews the theoretical basis for such a treatment strategy. All the children had been exposed to cumulative traumatic experiences of parental violence. The children presented symptoms of post-traumatic stress, developmental problems related to trauma, had difficulties with any discussion of traumatic events or family concerns, and reacted with hyperarousal and/or an 'emotional shutdown' response.  Previous treatments included a combination of social, family, psychological and biological interventions. The group was a therapeutic intervention developed by a child psychiatrist and an art therapist to facilitate further therapeutic change. The therapeutic use of artworks facilitated exposure to traumatic cues in a less direct manner, allowed for desensitization of anxiety and unpleasant body sensations, helped the children recount the story of the parental separation and to label and articulate affective states using art and narrative. Positive family changes and coping skills the children were using to manage ongoing stresses were made overt. Positive expectations of the future were promoted. Key therapeutic and theoretical aspects of the group intervention are described. ========================================

 

Title: Meaning reconstruction & the experience of loss.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Neimeyer, Robert A.

Source/Citation: Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association; 2001, (xiii, 359)

Abstract/Review/Citation: A prominent theme presented in this volume is that symptoms in the bereaved individual have meaning-making significance and that meaning reconstruction in response to loss is the central process in grieving.  More scientifically oriented readers will find comprehensive discussions of research programs supporting these tenets, particularly those linking grief with responses to loss involved in trauma. Practitioners will find clinically informed models and ample case descriptions to bridge concepts with real people suffering real loss. All will find new paradigms for approaching loss and reconstruction of meaning in a respectful, revealing way that has significance both personally and professionally.

Notes/Comments: Contributors Preface Introduction: Meaning

reconstruction and loss [by] Robert A. Neimeyer

Part I: Breaking ground: Toward a fresh theory of grieving Beyond decathexis: Toward a new psychoanalytic understanding and treatment of mourning George Hagman Relearning the world: Making and finding meanings Thomas Attig Meaning making in the dual process model of coping with bereavement Margaret S. Stroebe and Henk Schut

Part II: Re-establishing relationships: Context and connection The inner representations of the dead child in the psychic and social narratives of bereaved parents Dennis Klass Family construction of meaning Janice Winchester Nadeau The death of a child with a developmental disability Elisabeth Moulton Milo

Part III: Transcending trauma: Growth after loss The tormented and the transformed: Understanding responses to loss and trauma Christopher G. Davis Posttraumatic growth: The positive lessons of loss Laurence G. Calhoun and Richard G. Tedeschi Spiritual resources following a partner's death from AIDS T. Anne Richards Positive outcomes of losing a loved one  Thomas T. Frantz, Megan M. Farrell, and Barbara C. Trolley

Part IV: Healing stories: Research and reflexivity Shattered beliefs: Reconstructing the self of the trauma counselor Marla J. Arvay Embracing their memory: The construction of accounts of loss and hope John H. Harvey, Heather R. Carlson, Tamara M. Huff, and Melinda A. Green Research as therapy: The power of narrative to effect change Bronna D. Romanoff

Part V: Renegotiating the world: Meaning making in grief therapy The language of loss: Grief therapy as a process of meaning reconstruction Robert A. Neimeyer Construing stress: A

constructivist therapeutic approach to posttraumatic stress reactions Kenneth W. Sewell and Amy M. Williams Trauma, grief, and surviving childhood sexual abuse Stephen J. Fleming and Sheri Kathleen Belanger Videography: Re-storying the lives of clients facing terminal illness Sandra A. Rigazio-DiGilio Subject index Author index About the editor  ========================================

 

Title: Educating students with TBI: Themes and recommendations.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Ylvisaker, Mark; Todis, Bonnie; Glang, Ann; Urbanczyk, Beth; Franklin, Cecilia; DePompei, Roberta;

Feeney, Timothy; Maxwell, Nancy Maher; Pearson, Sue; Tyler, Janet Siantz

Source/Citation: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation: Special Issue: Vol 16(1) Feb 2001, US: Aspen Publishers Inc; 2001,

76-93

Abstract/Review/Citation: Examined professionals' perspectives on educating students with traumatic brain injury (TBI). 10 experienced educational consultants and researchers of TBI issues completed questionnaires concerning educating TBI students in public schools. Results show that Ss identified

problems with (1) underreported TBI incidence and prevalence; (2) diversity and central tendencies within the TBI population; (3) TBI assessment difficulties; (4) TBI school transition support and educational intervention effectiveness; (5) TBI teacher-therapist training and support; (6) family intervention and support; and (7) educational system change and flexibility.  It is concluded that several problems contribute to difficulties educating students with TBI. ========================================

 

Title: Imago theory and the psychology of attraction.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Love, Pat; Shulkin, Sunny

Source/Citation: Family Journal-Counseling & Therapy for Couples & Families: Special Issue: Vol 9(3) Jul 2001, US: Sage Publications Inc; 2001, 246-249

Abstract/Review/Citation: There is an unconscious repetitive need to seek partners who offer--for good or for bad--the familiar love of childhood. The attempt to change a partner from one who offers the negative aspects to one who offers affirming love is an attempt to reverse the trauma of misattuned love in childhood. Consciousness of the pattern is the requirement to begin its reversal. ========================================

 

Title: The practice of Modern Group Psychotherapy: Working with past trauma in the present.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Cohen, Phyllis F.

Source/Citation: International Journal of Group Psychotherapy; Vol 51(4) Oct 2001, US: Guilford Publications; 2001, 489-503.

Abstract/Review/Citation: Notes that Modern Group Psychotherapy offers specific techniques for aiding the pre-oedipal patient to speak connect, and achieve emotional growth. This article illustrates the use of such therapeutic group tools as joining, mirroring, bridging, contact functioning, the object-oriented question, the insulation barrier, and transient

identification, through case vignettes. It demonstrates how such techniques protect fragile egos and assist them on their journey to maturity. Emphasis is placed on the creative components of countertransference as a valuable supplement in patient treatment. The power of the group as an agent for change is portayed.

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Title: Recovered and continuous memories of childhood sexual abuse: A quantitative and qualitative analysis.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Stoler, Linda Ribble

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences & Engineering; Vol 61(10-B) May 2001, US: Univ Microfilms International; 2001, 5582

Abstract/Review/Citation: This study is an in-depth examination of women who reported childhood sexual abuse (CSA). Among a non-clinical sample of 26 women, ages 22-65, 11 reported they had always remembered CSA (continuous

memories) and 15 reported they had forgotten CSA for some period of their lives (delayed memories). Participants completed a questionnaire which included demographics, abuse history, therapy history, symptom checklists, Family Functioning Scale, Dissociative Experiences Scale, and the Adult Sexual

Victimization Scale, and were then interviewed. Eighty-six percent of women with delayed, and 46% with continuous, memories reported corroboration. Only one woman reported a therapist was the first to raise the possibility of abuse. Quantitative comparisons revealed that women with delayed memories were younger at the time of their abuse and more closely related to their abusers.  Family functioning and dissociative experiences were not significantly different, due to small n and high variability, but there was a trend towards

more negative but ritualistic family patterns and greater dissociative tendencies among the women with delayed memories. In qualitative interviews, women with delayed memories reported that they had more positive or ambivalent

relationships with their abusers, and had, as children, disclosed their abuse less frequently than those with continuous memories; when they did disclose, they were disbelieved. While disclosures among women with continuous memories led to mixed reactions, at least one person had believed them. Recovered

memories were described as generally fragmented and isolated, as physical or affective sensations, or disconnected visual flashes, qualities which did not change with therapy. Women with continuous memories described their memories as clear and visual, and were more able to give a sequential narrative of

abuse incidents. All women reported some distress attributed to the sexual abuse, including suicidality, which had been more pervasive and severe for women with delayed memories. Results expand upon previous data, and support suggestions that young children may forget trauma. Results supported Jennifer Freyd's betrayal trauma theory, which posits that children who are dependent upon their abuser-betrayer are more likely to deny the abusive part of their lives, as a strategy for emotional and physical survival. ========================================

 

Title: What does it take to collaborate with families affected by brain injury? A preliminary model.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Sohlberg, McKay Moore; McLaughlin, Karen A.; Todis, Bonnie; Larsen, Jennifer; Glang, Ann

Source/Citation: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation; Vol 16(5) Oct 2001, US: Aspen Publishers; 2001, 498-511

Abstract/Review/Citation: Reports on a preliminary model for collaboration procedures for rehabilitation professionals working in clinical and educational settings with individuals with brain injury and their families. Collaboration is a process in which family expertise is acknowledged and used to direct selection, implementation, and evaluation of treatment plans. The authors conducted a 2-yr, qualitative study with 8 families of injured

individuals who were 16 to 50 yrs old. This led to the development of this accessible model and a prescriptive manual for applying collaborative principles to practice. The model divided the therapeutic process into 3 overlapping phases (the initial interview, the identification and prioritization of goals, and monitoring change and revisiting goals). Although collaboration has been frequently considered an ideal relationship between professionals and families, many rehabilitation and education professionals have traditionally emphasized the role of the professional as responsible for client change. The collaborative model here does not introduce new concepts, but the data reinforces existing reports that collaboration with clients' families improves treatment outcomes, and the model delineates practice

procedures. An Appendix includes an interview guide.

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Title: Leaving the "professional home": Women in mental health

professions.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Kessel, Louise; Todres, Maxine; Av-Ron, Suzanna

Source/Citation: Journal of Feminist Family Therapy; Vol 13(1) 2001, US: Haworth Press; 2001, 47-56

Abstract/Review/Citation: This paper explores the "leaving home" process that professional women experience upon leaving mental health organizations. It examines some of the parallel processes of individual growth and organizational development in the mental health systems and analyzes the transitions that are normative in professional life. It assumes that the process for women will differ from that of men and it relates to some of the

ways that socialization reinforces women's dependency needs. It discusses how these needs are complementary with the nature of the helping professions. The paper identifies some contributing factors that determine whether the leave-taking will be "healthy," with normative manifestations of sadness and loss, or regressive and nonego-enhancing, accompanied by trauma, anger and rejection. It illustrates some of the issues that arise in vignettes, describing the leave-taking process for two professional women. ========================================

 

Title: The impact of trauma on Russian family patterns.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Winer, Chana

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences & Engineering; Vol 61(12-B) 2001, US: Univ Microfilms International; 2001, 6763

Abstract/Review/Citation: The purpose of this Project Demonstrating Excellence (PDE) is to study the consequences of the previous totalitarian regimes' abuses on Russian families' structure and functioning. The author believes the family organization that initially helped counteract the effect of traumatic events caused by psycho-political oppression continues into the next generations even after it had become dysfunctional. The concept of trauma organized systems (Bentovim, 1992) is used in this context to mean that trauma

suffered by families as a result of political or societal abuse becomes an organizing principle in the families' lives and has consequences for the next generations.  The literature supports the idea that political trauma of major proportions is transmitted via different processes to the next generations. (Auerhahn and Laub, 1998; Baker and Gippenreiter, 1995; Becker and Diaz, 1998; Brown, 1998; Danieli, 1998; Edelman and Cordon, 1998; Harkness, 1993; Hogman, 1998; Kaslow, 1995; Rowland-Klein and Dunlop, 1997; Rousseau and Drapeau, 1998; Sigal, 1998; Solomon, 1998; Wardi, 1990.) This study describes the

particular patterns found in Russian families, whose traumatic experiences are a result of abusive outside forces and an abusive totalitarian regime. The patterns and behaviors which were repetitively seen in these interviews were: secrets, inability to separate, fear, mistrust, a particular relationship to authority, grandmother in a mother's role, alcoholism, particular gender

roles, and communal living. Method. Twelve open ended interviews were conducted which explored family patterns and behaviors that the family found useful during times of oppression, some of which became dysfunctional and hindered the family as it tried to adjust to new realities. Two groups of

interviewees participated: The first group included political personages who influenced Russia's politics directly and helped change the system. These added to a psycho-political and psycho-historical understanding of the system in Russia during the last 75 years. The second group included professionals who talked of their families' experiences.  Most interviews were conducted with one family member. However, one multigenerational sequence of interviews was conducted and was made up of four interviews of the members of three

generations in a single family. ========================================

 

Title: Prevention of violence.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Bell, Carl C.; Fink, Paul Jay

Source/Citation: Psychiatric aspects of violence: Issues in prevention and treatment., San Francisco, CA, US: Jossey-Bass Inc, Publishers; 2000, (107), 37-47 New directions for mental health services, No. 86.

Source editor(s): Bell, Carl C. (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: Rebuilding the village, increasing access to health, improving bonding and attachment dynamics, providing opportunities to increase self-esteem and social skills, enhancing the adult protective shield, and minimizing the impact of trauma are presented as basic principles to change health behavior. The intent of putting these principles into practice is to strengthen the 2 key support systems of children, the family and the school, so that they can provide primary prevention of violence.

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Title: Restorying trauma with narrative therapy: Using the phantom family.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Merscham, Carrie

Source/Citation: Family Journal-Counseling & Therapy for Couples & Families; Vol 8(3) Jul 2000, US: Sage Publications, Inc.; 2000, 282-286

Abstract/Review/Citation: Presents a family-focused example of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment using the narrative model of therapy. The narrative approach is a postmodern theory emphasizing the problem-saturated stories of lives, using a nonexpert-based therapeutic stance and focusing on a collaborative restorying of the client's life. As a case in point, Summer reported a long history of traumatic sexual abuse extending back to infancy, regarding cousins, boyfriends, and male stalkers. She reported stress and deep hatred of men, and believed she had little influence over her problems. She was interested in changing her life story, while recognizing that there were many items that she wanted to retain. Her PTSD symptoms were normalized.  Summer built upon her positive relationship with her parents to overcome troubling dreams; her newly developed ability to reach out to others for help constituted a major change in her original story. ========================================

 

Title: Infant-parent psychotherapy: Core concepts and current approaches.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Lieberman, Alicia F.; Silverman, Robin; Pawl, Jeree H.

Source/Citation: Handbook of infant mental health (2nd ed.)., New York, NY, US: The Guilford Press; 2000, (xvii, 588), 472-484

Source editor(s): Zeanah, Charles H., Jr. (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: The authors describe infant-parent psychotherapy.  Infant-parent psychotherapy is a multimodal method of intervention that uses joint work with parents, infants, toddlers, and, more recently, preschoolers.  The ultimate goal is improving parent-child relationships and children's

socioemotional functioning. In this chapter, they describe both core concepts and recent innovations in this therapeutic approach that always has emphasized the therapeutic relationship as a basic catalyst for change.  ========================================

 

Title: A creative play therapy approach to the group treatment of young sexually abused children.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Gallo-Lopez, Loretta

Source/Citation: Short-term play therapy for children., New York, NY, US: The Guilford Press; 2000, (xiv, 384), 269-295

Source editor(s): Kaduson, Heidi Gerard (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: Presents a comprehensive, time-limited group treatment program for sexually abused children (aged 3-10 yrs). The program attempts to combine the essential elements of therapy with sexually abused children into a

treatment protocol that appears to be well-suited for this population. It offers a time-limited approach that directly addresses symptoms of trauma, developmental issues, and the impact of sexual abuse on interpersonal relationships. Though much of the program is directive and abuse-specific, it relies on the healing power of child-centered, nondirective play therapy to enhance the potential for growth and change. The author aims to provide the reader with a framework of healing opportunities to meet the complex needs of the young sexually abused child. ========================================

 

Title: Exploring the counselor's experience of working with perpetrators and survivors of domestic violence.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Iliffe, Gillian; Steed, Lyndall G.

Source/Citation: Journal of Interpersonal Violence; Vol 15(4) Apr 2000, US: Sage Publications Inc; 2000, 393-412

Abstract/Review/Citation: Examined the professional and personal impact on counselors from working with domestic violence (DV) clients. Semi-structured interviews with 18 counselors (mean age 45.8 yrs) having case loads of more

than 50% DV clients yielded themes including initial impact of DV counseling, personal impact of hearing traumatic material, changes to cognitive schema, challenging issues for DV counselors, burnout, and coping strategies. Ss described classic symptoms of vicarious trauma, and reported changes in

cognitive schema, particularly in regard to safety, world view, and gender power issues. Challenging aspects of DV counseling included changes in counseling practice to meet the unique needs of DV clients, difficulties with confidentiality, and feelings of isolation and powerlessness. 12 Ss reported feelings of burnout. Reported adaptive strategies included monitoring client

caseloads, debriefing, peer support, self-care and political involvement for social change.  ========================================

 

Title: Scholastic achievement of adolescent refugees from Cambodia and Central America.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Rousseau, Cecile; Drapeau, Aline

Source/Citation: Adolescence; Vol 35(138) Sum 2000, Switzerland: Editions Medecine et Hygiene; 2000, 243-258

Abstract/Review/Citation: Investigated the relationship of emotional disturbance and pre- and postmigration environment to the scholastic achievement of adolescent refugees of very different cultural backgrounds. 152 Central American and Cambodian students in 6 Canadian high schools, as well as their parents, were interviewed to assess the students' emotional problems (using the Youth Self-Report and Child Behavior Checklist) and to determine the pre- and postmigration family environment. The findings indicate that the relationship between the emotional problems and scholastic achievement of teenaged refugees was tenuous. It was concluded that a connection between young refugees' symptomatology and their functional capacity should not be assumed. Nonetheless, it is suggested that certain pre- and postmigration variables, particularly trauma experienced in the homeland, seem to be associated with the academic achievement of some refugees.  ========================================

 

Title: Family guide to emotional wellness.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Fanning, Patrick; McKay, Matthew

Source/Citation: Oakland, CA, US: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.; 2000, (xi, 720)

Abstract/Review/Citation: This book is an encyclopedia of self-help first aid techniques, skill-building tips, worksheets, exercises, and information about a range of psychological and emotional concerns. Experienced family therapists show how to help children build self-esteem and learn stress-coping skills.

Relationship experts provide exercises and techniques to help couples enhance their communication and sex life. Tested strategies offer everyone tools for overcoming common addictions, such as drinking and smoking, and change behaviors and habits for more healthy lifestyles. Practical step-by-step

suggestions help the entire family relax, reduce anxiety and stress, and enjoy life and each other. Also included is basic information about dealing with common problems such as eating disorders, depression, marital distress, panic attacks, worry, grief, traumatic events, and physical pain. The book is arranged by category, which allows the reader to easily access information about any particular issue.  This book was written by therapists, psychiatrists, social workers, counselors, medical doctors, and others with experience working with and writing for families. A complete reference for further reading is included.

Notes/Comments: Preface Acknowledgments Introduction

Part I: Getting along Couple skills Sex Anger Communication Step families Infidelity Caregiving

Part II: Kids Postpartum survival Parenting skills Kids and anger Children's sexuality--What is normal? Divorce and kids Trauma and kids Anxiety and kids

Part III: Consuming passions Eating disorders Body image Alcohol and drugs Smoking Gambling Internet addiction Part IV: Coping with physical problems Self-care and nurturing Premenstrual syndrome Perimenopause Menopause Testicular and prostrate cancer Chronic illness and pain Preparing for surgery

Part V: Coping with bad moods and painful feelings Stress Self-Esteem Uncovering automatic thoughts Changing patterns of limited thinking Changing hot thoughts Anxiety--Overview of the disorders Panic attacks Phobias Social phobia Obsessions and compulsions Traumatic experiences Grief Preparing for a parent's death Depression Suicide prevention

Part VI: Getting help Brief therapy Psychiatric drugs

Part VII: Optimizing your life Relaxation Meditation Visualization Dreams Further reading self-help guide for skill-building & other techniques for emotional wellness, families

========================================

 

Title: Finding the energy to heal:  How EMDR, hypnosis, TFT, imagery, and body-focused therapy can help restore mindbody health.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Phillips, Maggie

Source/Citation: New York, NY, US: W. W. Norton & Co, Inc; 2000, (xviii, 276)

Abstract/Review/Citation: Written as a guide for professionals interested in cutting-edge methodology as well as for readers seeking solutions to perplexing health challenges, this book applies the principles of energy psychology and medicine to mind-body healing. This book explores the possibility that psychological methods can be used to address subtle energies in mindbody systems and thereby restore health. Throughout the book the author emphasizes the principles of gathering and building on strengths that each client already owns, using tools that provoke energetic flow to dissolve barriers to health, and selecting strategies that utilize the powerful effects of positive expectancy.  In the 1st 4 sections, stories illustrate how eye

movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), hypnosis, imagery, thought field therapy (TFT), and body-focused therapy can be used to solve the mysteries of health crises triggered by general stresses and anxiety, posttraumatic stress, and the challenges of organic conditions such as cancer, head injury, arthritis, and cardiac disease. The final section presents 3

models for combining and integrating energy therapies to increase healing possibilities for individuals with complex health situations that do not respond to any one approach.

Notes/Comments:  Acknowledgments Introduction

Section I. EMDR: Moving toward health Introducing EMDR EMDR and stress symptoms Beyond trauma: Enhancing mindbody health

Section II. Hypnosis: The power of healing trances Introducing hypnosis Clinical hypnosis: The inner healer Ericksonian hypnosis: Activating unconscious pathways Ego-state therapy: The healing presence of the inner family of self

Section III. Imagery: Opening windows of the mind Introducing imagery Structured imagery: Blueprints for change Fantasies, dreams, and other spontaneous gifts of the creative imagination Section IV. Somatic energy therapies: Coming home to the

body Introducing somatic energy therapies TFT: Reversing negative thought fields and their effects on the body Giving the body its due: Body-focused psychotherapy Section V. Integrated models: Addressing complex health needs Introducing integrated models The linking model: Bridging to new experiences

of health through EMDR and TFT The unconscious learning model: Leading with hypnosis, somatic experiencing, and imagery The braiding model: Interweaving modalities for comprehensive healing Conclusions Glossary Notes Appendices References Index eye movement desensitization & reprocessing & hypnosis & thought field therapy & imagery & body-focused therapy

for mindbody health

========================================

 

Title: A multi-method treatment for child survivors of sexual abuse: An intervention informed by relational and trauma theories.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Levendosky, Alytia A.; Buttenheim, Margaret

Source/Citation: Journal of Child Sexual Abuse: Special Issue: Vol 9(2) 2000, US: Haworth Press Inc; 2000, 1-19

Abstract/Review/Citation: Presents a case study of the treatment of an 11 yr old pre-adolescent female survivor of incest. The treatment integrated relational and trauma theory perspectives in focusing on reducing self-blame, preventing further isolation, creating a safe, secure environment, and helping the patient develop positive connections with others and feelings of self-competence. In order to promote these treatment goals, the authors used a systemic approach in working directly within the family, school, and social service agencies. This multi-method treatment facilitated the change and maintenance of an improved environment for the patient which was essential for psychological and interpersonal change to occur.

========================================

 

Title: The trauma client's experience of eye movement densensitization and reprocessing:  A heuristic analysis.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Schleyer, Marilyn A.

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences & Engineering; Vol 61(1-B) Jul 2000, US: Univ Microfilms International; 2000, 549

Abstract/Review/Citation: Traumatic stress and its impact on the individual, family and society have been described in the literature for over one hundred years. Controversy exists regarding etiology, determinants and therapeutic intervention for traumatic stress. There is limited research regarding the

comparative value of treatment of trauma. In 1989 Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) emerged as a therapeutic intervention for traumatic stress. Studies have shown the benefits of EMDR to be equal to or superior to those of other therapies in the treatment of PTSD. To date, the value of EMDR has been measured primarily by the decrease or amelioration of symptoms.  Limited research has focused on the client's experience of EMDR and life changes after EMDR. The specific aim of this study was to: (a) generate a description of the personal experience of the EMDR process, (b) identify

whether life changes had occurred after EMDR, and (c) if any life changes had occurred describe the changes and the nature of these changes. Data were collected via unstructured interviews with seven individuals who had experienced some form of trauma, and who had experienced EMDR as a therapeutic

intervention for trauma. van Manen's and Heidegger's interpretive processes were used to guide the method of data analysis. The shared meanings identified were: (a) Set-up for Harm, (b) Being Stuck, (c) Willing to Risk in Spite of, (d) Release, (e) Movement and (f) Ongoing Movement. The participants all

described childhood events of being put in harms way. As adults participants felt frustrated with their inability to change personal and relational alienation which resulted from the childhood events. However, in spite of incredulity and fears, risking the experience of EMDR was primarily dependent on trust in the therapist. All experienced emotional, cognitive and physical release in response to the EMDR experience which allowed participants to move forward with their lives.  ========================================

 

Title: Strategies for survival through healing among Native American women:  An urban case study.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Mangelson Stander, Elon

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities & Social Sciences; Vol 61(2-A) Aug 2000, US: Univ Microfilms International; 2000, 780

Abstract/Review/Citation: This study of Native American women residing in two Utah cities was conducted to examine patterns of healing and recovery from several types of personal trauma. The research was conducted using ethnographic techniques including participant observation and in-depth open-ended interviews. In addition, a preliminary comparative analysis was made with a rural population on the Northern Cheyenne reservation in Montana. Domestic abuse, sexual abuse, substance abuse, cultural oppression, grief and rejection/abandonment were issues precipitating recovery among these American Indian women. The pattern of recovery emerging from the study is a four stage model. In Stage 1, women came to recognize the need for recovery. A parental imperative to care for dependent children was an important force for women's

recognition of the need to change. A central motif of the model is a personal commitment to survival through healing. Coming to this decision represents Stage 2 and is essential for the recovery process to move forward. Constituting Stage 3, strategies to direct and support the commitment to recovery are then selected from resources available. Six strategies were most salient. Spirituality and religion seemed to be the most indispensable overall. Other strategies were education, formal recovery programs or counseling, significant others or social networks, relocation, and culture/roots. In Stage 4, recovery and healing results in self discovery, improved self-esteem and improved social skills. Women also found themselves taking on new roles as a result of recovery. Frequently, women in recovery

turned to community. New personal strengths and skills were used to enhance community resources as they reached out to help others through a variety of avenues including involvement in the public schools, community outreach programs and those specifically targeting adult healing. Other issues discussed are power and control, patterns of cultural revitalization and

resistance to cultural erosion and loss, generational patterns and urban identity issues. The urban-rural comparison showed, among other findings, variations in the pattern of religious affiliation. Higher percentages of rural women were involved with traditional spiritual practices. Recovery centers were more central to rural women's recovery compared to urban women. (traditional religion, Native American Church, power, urban, reservation.) ========================================

 

Title: Acute impact of severe traumatic brain injury on family structure and coping responses.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Curtiss, Glenn; Klemz, Steve; Vanderploeg, Rodney D.

Source/Citation: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation: Special Issue: Defense and Veterans Head Injury Program. Vol 15(5) Oct 2000, US: Aspen Publishers Inc; 2000, 1113-1122

Abstract/Review/Citation: The present study used D. H. Olson's Circumplex Model (1982) to examine acute changes in family structure and changes in coping responses pre- and post-traumatic brain injury (TBI). 20 wives (aged 18-56 yrs) of male TBI survivors (aged 19-69 yrs) completed the Couples Version of the Family Adaptability and Cohesion Evaluation Scales-II (FACES-II) and the Coping Responses Inventory (CRI). These questionnaires were completed retrospectively for a stressful event that occurred 6 months prior to the TBI, then for the current period following the TBI. Results found that 60% of all families experienced a significant change in structure following TBI. As predicted by the Circumplex Model, balanced families changed most, with 70% changing to the extreme type post-TBI. Focus of coping (problem versus emotion) and coping techniques (cognitive versus behavioral) also changed

significantly from pre- to post-TBI and differed, depending on post-TBI family structure. Family interventions based on these differences in family structure and coping are presented.

========================================

 

Title: What are the lessons of the police arrest studies?

Author(s)/Editor(s): Garner, Joel H.; Maxwell, Christopher D.

Source/Citation: Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma: Special Issue: Vol 4(1) 2000, US: Haworth Press; 2000, 83-114

Abstract/Review/Citation: Discusses 6 domestic violence police arrest experiments and several precursor studies, which are argued to have significantly informed the debate about the deterrent effects of criminal justice sanctions and about the importance of how police can respond effectively to domestic violence. Early reviews synthesizing results from the 6 experiments concluded that the deterrent effect of arrest was not significant; however, these reviews generally did not meet the methodological rigor of the 5 replication experiments. Two attempts using different approaches for systematically combining results across multiple studies have concluded that there is a significant deterrent effect from arrest. Based upon data gathered from victim interviews, these 2 studies suggest that contemporary policies requiring preferred or mandatory arrest may be providing protection for victims, though there is little change in the prevalence of police response over time. These studies have also shown that methodological rigor is required throughout the scientific process, and not just during the

data collection and analysis stages. ========================================

 

Title: Controversies in family preservation programs.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Gelles, Richard J.

Source/Citation: Journal of Aggression, Maltreatment & Trauma: Special Issue: Children exposed to domestic violence: Current issues in research, intervention, prevention, and policy development; Vol 3(1) 2000, US: Haworth Press; 2000, 239-252

Abstract/Review/Citation: Examines the controversies over the use of family preservation policies to prevent and treat child abuse and neglect. The paper summarizes the research on intensive family preservation services and reports that such programs do not reduce placements nor do they appear to enhance child safety. The author concludes by proposing that risk assessments and assessments of readiness to change could improve decision-making regarding which families might be aided by family preservation and which children should be protected by terminating their parents' rights. ========================================

 

Title: Primary care psychiatry and behavioral medicine:  Brief office treatment and management pathways.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Feinstein, Robert E.; Brewer, Anne A.

Source/Citation: New York, NY, US: Springer Publishing Co, Inc; 1999, (xxiii, 504)

Abstract/Review/Citation: This book is intended for primary care providers making mental health diagnoses under managed care. Each chapter focuses on a specific psychiatric disorder and behavioral indicators that predispose or follow medical conditions, especially as they are presented in outpatient

settings. Chapter authors include prevalence, course indicators, and treatment pathways for each condition, including pharmacology, psychology interventions, and medical considerations. Physicians and physicians in training will appreciate the quick-access format, tables, and clear graphs that complement the text structure; mental health professionals working in clinical settings can now access clear and comprehensive referral guidelines to inform their practice.

Notes/Comments: Foreword Preface Acknowledgments

Contributors Psychosocial aspects of primary care: Theoretical models of practice Peter M. Rabinowitz

Part I: Psychiatric disorders in primary care Anxiety disorders Robert E. Feinstein Depression Janis L. Cutler and Rita Charon Substance abuse Gerald D. Roberts Psychiatric symptoms due to medical illness Robert E. Feinstein Somatoform disorders Brian A. Fallon Violence and suicide Robert E. Feinstein Personality disorders in office practice Robert E. Feinstein and Susan Vanderberg Schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders

Lewis A. Opler Sexual disorders and sexual trauma Anne A. Brewer Psychological disorders and problems of childhood and adolescence Marion Hart and Stanley Kaye

Part II: Behavioral medicine in primary care Cardiovascular and

psychosocial risk factors reduction: Office-based interventions Robert E. Feinstein, Peter M. Rabinowitz, Laurel Carey, Joyelle Gallicano, Anne A. Brewer, Abraham Bornstein, Joseph V. Connelly, Pamela F. LeDeaux and Dewees H. Brown A model for office-based cardiovascular risk reduction and behavioral change Robert E. Feinstein, Peter M. Rabinowitz, Laurel Carey, Joyelle Gallicano, Anne A. Brewer, Abraham Bornstein, Joseph V. Connelly and Pamela F. LeDeaux Women's health through the reproductive cycle: Premenstrual syndrome, postpartum disorders, and menopause Eve Caligor and Marian Ormont Death and dying Anne A. Brewer and Joseph V. Connelly

Part III: Psychosocial treatments in primary care Consulting and counseling in primary care Leslie Prusnofsky and Robert E. Feinstein Crisis intervention in office practice Robert E. Feinstein and Laurel Carey Family counseling Anne A. Brewer and Charlotte

Creech Behavioral counseling and medical adherence Robert E. Feinstein, Joseph S. Pachman and Roberta Stiel Index primary care psychiatry & behavioral medicine under managed care, patients with physical &/or psychological disorders

========================================

 

Title: Expressing emotion:  Myths, realities, and therapeutic strategies.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Kennedy-Moore, Eileen; Watson,

Jeanne C.

Source/Citation: New York, NY, US: The Guilford Press; 1999, (xviii, 365) Emotions and social behavior.

Abstract/Review/Citation: In daily life, emotional expression enables people to communicate with each other and influence relationships; in psychotherapy, it provides information about how clients are feeling and how they are relating to the therapist. This volume examines expressions of such feelings as love, anger, and sadness, and highlights the individual and interpersonal processes that shape emotional behavior. It offers a discussion of the role of emotional expression and nonexpression in individual adaptation, social interaction, and therapeutic process.  Drawing upon theory and research, the authors provide guidelines to help identify, conceptualize, and treat problems in emotional behavior. Through clinical examples, the authors illuminate a range of problems related to both expression and nonexpression, and provide insight into how these can be addressed in individual and couple therapy.  This

guide is an important resource for teachers, students, and researchers of clinical, counseling, social, personality, and health psychology, as well as practicing counselors and psychotherapists. It will also serve as a text in advanced undergraduate and graduate-level courses on emotion and interpersonal communication, and in graduate-level counseling and psychotherapy seminars.

Notes/Comments:  Part I. Introduction Expression, nonexpression, and well-being: An overview

Part II. Intrapersonal processes The myth of emotional venting Blind spots and epiphanies: Expression, nonexpression, and emotional insight The "shoulds," "oughts," and "musts" of emotional behavior: Expressive goals and values

Part III. Interpersonal processes Family socialization of emotional behavior Men, women, and the language of love Telling one's

troubles: Expression of distress in intimate relationships

Part IV. Treatment implications Expression and nonexpression in psychotherapy: Facilitating emotional understanding and behavioral change Beyond sadness: Therapeutic approaches to emotional constriction in depression Flooding or blunting:

Vacillating expression and nonexpression in bereavement and trauma Emotional expression in marital therapy Expression-related interventions in health psychology

Part V. Conclusion Balance in emotional behavior References Index role of emotional expression & nonexpression, guidelines to identify & conceptualize & treat emotional behavioral problems in individual & couple therapy  ========================================

 

Title: Nowhere to grow:  Homeless and runaway adolescents and their families.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Whitbeck, Les B.; Hoyt, Dan R.

Source/Citation: Hawthorne, NY, US: Aldine de Gruyter; 1999, (xi, 216) Social institutions and social change.

Abstract/Review/Citation: This book comes out of a study of over 600 runaway and homeless adolescents (aged 12-22 yrs) and over 200 of their caretakers, who were from large to smaller cities in 4 midwestern states. It focuses on the family histories of these young people and on the developmental impact of early independence. Street social networks, subsistence strategies, sexuality, and street victimization are all considered in terms of their effect on adolescent behaviors and emotional well-being. Relying on interviews and data from a survey devised by their team and working in partnership with street outreach agencies, the authors lead the reader through the various risk factors associated with precocious independence, beginning in the family and then extending to their Ss' environments and behaviors once they have opted to leave. In the book, the authors produce a poignant account of cumulative consequences for young people who had few good options at the outset, and have even fewer when they are on their own.

Notes/Comments: Acknowledgments

Part I. Society's forgotten children Runaway and homeless

adolescents in America The Midwest Homeless and Runaway Adolescent Project

Part II. The family lives of runaway and homeless adolescents The early lives of runaways Troubled generations Getting along at home: The parent/caretaker-child relationship

Part III. Taking chances: Adolescents on their own Getting along: The social networks of runaway adolescents Getting by: Survival strategies of runaway adolescents Getting it on: Sexuality, risky sex, and pregnancy Getting hurt: Victimization and trauma on the streets

Part IV. Nowhere to grow: The developmental consequences of running away Internalization problems among runaway and homeless adolescents Substance use and externalization problems among runaway adolescents A risk-amplification

developmental model for runaway and homeless adolescents Growing up on society's margins Appendix References Index family histories & street networks & subsistence strategies & sexuality & victimization & developmental impacts of precocious independence, runaway & homeless 12-22 yr olds & their caretakers ========================================

 

Title: A crude way of loving: On surviving the trauma of therapeutic change with borderline patients in group psychotherapy.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Kegerreis, Duncan

Source/Citation: Group Analysis; Vol 32(3) Sep 1999, England: Sage Publications Ltd; 1999, 427-441

Abstract/Review/Citation: This article traces the development of one patient, a White, working-class Englishman in his early 40s,  in a psychotherapy group in which borderline pathology predominated. Dynamics specific to the therapeutic

engagement of borderline patients and pressures experienced by the group analyst are illustrated. The author recommends particular adjustments in technique when conducting borderline groups, as a crushing psychological burden is placed on the therapist into whom mental health and potential for growth are projected.

========================================

 

Title: Healing from trauma: The quest for spirituality.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Barrett, Mary Jo

Source/Citation: Spiritual resources in family therapy., New York, NY, US: Guilford Publications, Inc; 1999, (xvi, 301),

193-208

Source editor(s): Walsh, Froma (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: Discusses spiritual aspects in recovery from trauma in treatment. Topics include: love and knowledge; integrating spiritual meaning and value into treatment; and conscious spirituality (stage 1: creating a

context for change, stage 2: challenging patterns and expanding realities, stage 3: consolidation). ========================================

 

Title: Autobiographical narrative and the question of coherence: Implications for identity development.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Chance, Chris Marshall

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences & Engineering; Vol 59(8-B) Feb 1999, US: Univ. Microfilms International; 1999, 4497

Abstract/Review/Citation: Theory and research pertaining to the nature of identity development, new narrative methodologies, and narrative theory of identity are briefly reviewed. It was proposed that a new method in measuring narrative coherence may serve to bridge the gap between theory and method which appears problematic in theories of identity (e.g., Grotevant, 1993). The present project attempted to validate Fiese et al.'s (1995) collaborative project narrative coherence measure as a tool to measure identity development,

and to support Grotevant's (1987) process model of identity. Specifically, it was hypothesized that identity consolidation would be associated with greater coherence of self-relevant narrative. A multi-method approach was used in an effort to establish construct, convergent, and discriminant validity of the

narrative coherence measure. In addition to identity consolidation, it was predicted that narrative coherence would positively correlate with orientation toward life, and healthy family functioning. It was further expected that verbal intelligence and social desirability would not significantly predict

narrative coherence ratings. Sixty-two undergraduate subjects completed questionnaires associated with personal background (Demographics), identity (EOMEIS-2), orientation toward life (Antonovsky's SOC), family functioning (FACES-III), and social desirability (Marlowe-Crowne SDS). Subjects participated in a verbal intelligence task (WAIS-R vocabulary subtest). Next, each told two personal stories (one neutral, and one about personal change) which were captured on videotape and coded on coherence by trained, unbiased coders. Results did not conform to expected patterns, but partial, indirect evidence consistent with the major prediction emerged. Findings of particular interest concern the relevance of affective congruence in communication and identity process, apparent influence of trauma content in change stories, and gender differences in coherence codability. Findings were discussed in relation to theoretical predictions, with special attention to methodological strategies which may enhance statistical findings in future investigations. ========================================

 

Title: Effects of individual client-centered play therapy on sexually-abused children's mood, self-concept, and social competence.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Zion, Terri Ann

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences & Engineering; Vol 60(4-B) Oct 1999, US: Univ. Microfilms International; 1999, 1876

Abstract/Review/Citation: The purpose of this study was to ascertain the effects of individual client-centered play therapy on sexually-abused children's mood, self-concept, and social competence. Several theories have been proffered that attempt to explain the effects of trauma on children along with attendant

treatment approaches. However, current published literature on individual client-centered play therapy outcome is severely lacking. To study the effects of play therapy on sexually-abused children, a single group pre-post research design using an active treatment group was utilized. A client-centered play therapy protocol was used with 26 cases of sexually-abused children, ages 3 to 9 years, referred from the Division of Child & Family Services. All children were assessed via a standardized intake procedure. Ten play therapists in the Inter-mountain region volunteered to provide weekly individual play-therapy treatment for 12 weeks to sexually-abused clients. The identification of the play therapy as 'client-centered' in orientation was verified utilizing a video taping and therapist-rating checklist procedure.

All subjects and parents completed an outcome battery (Joseph Preschool and Primary Self-Concept Screening Test, Behavior Assessment System for Children-Parent form, and Abuse Behavior Checklist) before, immediately after treatment, as well as two months following treatment. Analyses focused on

differences before and after play therapy on the measures. Results indicated no pre- to post treatment group improvement; however, 8 children demonstrated reliable clinical improvement, 4 deteriorated, 4 improved with follow-up deterioration, and 8 cases indicated no significant reliable change. Discussion of clinical change, patient and therapist characteristics, impact

on current practice and research limitations follows. ========================================

 

Title: Countertransference issues in working with a group surviving the traumatic homicide of a colleague.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Broden, Alexander R.

Source/Citation: Group; Vol 23(2) Jun 1999, US: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers; 1999, 67-76

Abstract/Review/Citation: Examines how experiences in group psychotherapy change individuals. Written from first-person perspective, this paper chronicles the experiences of a new group leader of a group of Russian immigrant psychotherapy trainees whose colleague was murdered by a patient. The article

follows the course of the group and touches on significant experiences for both the group leader and individuals in the group.

========================================

 

Title: Understanding clergy misconduct in religious systems:  Scapegoating, family secrets, and the abuse of power.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Benyei, Candace R.

Source/Citation: Binghamton, NY, US: The Haworth Pastoral Press/The Haworth Press, Inc; 1998, (xv, 197) Religion and mental health.

Abstract/Review/Citation: In  Understanding Clergy Misconduct in Religious Systems, you'll take an incisive look at why sexual misconduct occurs in religious systems and how to implement proactive strategies for holistic change. This exploration also takes a look at the psychology behind the

inevitable scapegoating that occurs in these situations, why it is

perpetuated, and how you can avoid the damaging tradition of silence that allows the trauma to continue its destructive work, impairing congregations for years to come. Whether you're a lay congregational leader, judicatory administrator, pastoral counselor, psychologist, or seminarian, you'll find that the coping strategies and intervention techniques it outlines will guide you in pinpointing the sickness at its source and restoring felicity and order to your religious leaders and their communities.

Notes/Comments:  (Abbreviated) Foreword [by] Nancy Myer

Hopkins Preface Acknowledgments The congregation as a family system The illusion of Eden and the fortified city God transference, the good object, and the makeup of ministers Mirroring God: Clergy in relationship The issue of clergy sexual misconduct Vulnerability and the psychology of the victim The

scapegoat as the bearer of evil Untold tales and skeletons in the closet The case of Hope Church Reowning responsibility Postscript: Becoming a functional spiritual family Appendix. Clinical presentation of survivors of sexual abuse Notes Glossary Index psychodynamics of & intervention for clergy sexual

misconduct ========================================

 

Title: The learning about myself (LAMS) program for at-risk parents:  Learning from the past-changing the future.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Rickard, Verna

Source/Citation: Binghamton, NY, US: Haworth Maltreatment and Trauma Press/The Haworth Press, Inc; 1998, (ix, 195)

Abstract/Review/Citation: Presents a basic, hands-on, weekly curriculum based on the concept of "Learning About Myself" that aims to change participants' lives from hopeless and helpless to confident and self-assured. Participants follow the 2nd book in this set,  The Learning About Myself (LAMS) Handbook for Group Participants, to learn how to make better decisions, set goals, and live life by choice rather than by chance. LAMs can be used as an introduction to individual counseling or as the sole treatment method. The leader of this course does not need to be a therapist--he/she need only be somewhat familiar with a basic knowledge of social work or psychological concepts.

Notes/Comments:  (Abbreviated) Acknowledgments Part one:

Program What is LAMS? Part II: Content How do I run the LAMS program Week one: My self Week two: My attitude Week three: My relationships Week four: My appearance Week five: My time for myself Week six: My friends Week seven: My education Week eight: My health Week nine: My family Week ten: My financial

responsibility Week eleven: My homemaking skills Week twelve: Second week, homemaking Week thirteen: Third week, homemaking Week fourteen: My goals Week fifteen: Celebration Appendix: The role of psychoeducational groups in enhancing personal relationships and social networks: Final report [by] Marianne Berry References for professionals Recommended readings for parents Index Learning About Myself group counseling program to enhance confidence & self assuredness, at-risk parents ========================================

 

Title: 'The music she hears': Point of view and technique in women's writing about childhood sexual abuse.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Klosterman, Ellen Frances

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities & Social Sciences; Vol 58(8-A) Feb 1998, US: University Microfilms International; 1998, 3116

Abstract/Review/Citation: Incest is the abuse of power differences between two people within a family: the person with greater power in a family takes sexual advantage of a person with lesser power. The vulnerability of the victim is not an invitation to the perpetrator; the perpetrator interprets it as such. The challenge then to the writer is to represent the consciousness of the victim without objectifying her. This dissertation explored technique in women's writing about childhood sexual abuse. Narrative point of view and structure were studied in Chute's The Beans of Egypt, Maine, Bass' Just After Inca, El Saadawi's Woman at Point Zero, Walker's The Color Purple, Dickson's Maddy's Song, Gaitskill's Two Girls: Fat and Thin, Casey and Wilson's The Flock, and Utain and Oliver's Scream Louder. Point of view was concluded to function as a boundary between author and intended audience(s) which is used by the author to manage the author's relationship(s) with her intended audience(s) by controlling disclosure. The retrospective narrator controls the sequence of events, provides a context for understanding the significance of events, and illuminates causes and effects between events and consequences. The narrator has the wisdom of hindsight in selecting details, sequencing the story, and organizing the layers of perceptual awareness and cognitive understandings within the story. The narrator also must navigate through the scientific and legal context for childhood sexual abuse; the economic context

for the victim's options for escape; and the social and political context, including pedophiles and proponents of 'False Memory Syndrome' alike. Consequently, this author advocates the conscious use of strategy and awareness of audience in decisions about techniques, especially if the writer's goal is political and social change. ========================================

 

Title: The family and family therapy in international perspective.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Gielen, Uwe P.; Comunian, Anna Laura

Source/Citation: Trieste, Italy: Edizioni Lint Trieste; 1998, (503)

Abstract/Review/Citation: In this book, 35 authors and co-authors from 13 countries outline the dynamics occurring in the families of their countries and explain how they help families cope with change, crises, trauma, and other stressful circumstances.

Notes/Comments:  Armenia China India Israel Japan Saudi Arabia Turkey US Preface Foreword by Jefferson M. Fish Editors

Section I: Approaches to family therapy and counseling The evolution of family-systems theories Robert F. Massey A new three-dimensional model of family development embedded in culture Michele B. Thomas The forgotten others: The importance of prevention with couples and families Luciano L'Abate and

Mario Cusinato

Section II: Family counseling and ethnic diversity Counseling West Indian immigrant families in the United States Sharon-ann Gopaul-McNicol Counseling Arab-American Families Nuha Abudabbeh

Section III: Chinese families Filial piety and filicide in Chinese family relationships: The legend of Shun and other stories David Y. F. Ho The changing Chinese family: Resources, parenting practices, and children's socioemotional problems Xinyin Chen The impact of social change on family and marriage in China Heng-Yu Huang Structured family therapeutic interviews for Chinese psychiatric cases Shur-Fen Gau and Chu-Chang Chen Family therapy for Chinese Americans Diana Chen

Section IV: Families and family therapy in Asia Family psychology in Japan Tetsuo Okado Family therapy with Japanese families Kenji Kameguchi Couples and family therapy with Indian families: Some structural and intergenerational considerations Mudita Rastogi and Karen S. Wampler

Section V: Families in traumatic circumstances Help! My child has joined a cult Lita Linzer Schwartz Treatment of families in stress situations: Armenian refugees and earthquake survivors Meline Karakashian After the Holocaust: Therapy with survivors and their families Moshe Lang The longest shadow: A clinical commentary on Moshe Lang's paper Edwin Harari The longest shadow: Comments on Moshe Lang's paper Florence W. Kaslow Section VI: Attachment, care, and attachment-trauma Attachment theory and research: A look at intergenerational issues Isabel Soares and M. Carolina Silva Infant care and dual career parents: Ideas and tips Alice Sterling Honig Long-term effects of the Turkish home-based Early Enrichment program Sevda Bekman Family treatment of attachment trauma problems in children Beverly James

Section VII: Families with exceptional children Families with exceptional children Selma G. Sapir Child health-related cognitions of parents with autistic children: A cross-national exploratory study Paul Probst Family influences on the

realization of scientific giftedness in Israeli adolescents: A follow-up study after 13 years Roberta M. Milgram and Eunsook Hong family dynamics & therapy to help cope with change & crises & trauma & other stressful circumstances, 13 countries ========================================

 

Title: Psychologists' desk reference.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Koocher, Gerald P.; Norcross, John C.; Hill, Sam S. III

Source/Citation: New York, NY, US: Oxford University Press; 1998, (xx, 613)

Abstract/Review/Citation: This book is intended as an authoritative and indispensable companion of mental health practitioners of all theoretical orientations and professional disciplines. This volume organizes and presents guides and essential information that clinicians, from practicum students to

seasoned practitioners, want on their desks. It contains diagnostic codes, test information, report checklists, practice guidelines, treatment principles, ethics refreshers, legal regulations, special population materials, professional resources, practice management tips, and related data that clinicians need. Multiple features of this book contribute to its ease of use. These entail a detailed table of contents; a coherent organization into 8 parts, in which chapters are arranged both chronologically (according to how treatment or consultation would proceed) and topically; cross references within contributions to related chapters in the book; and a comprehensive index.

Notes/Comments:  (Abbreviated) Contributors

Part I: Assessment and diagnosis Lifetime prevalence of mental disorders in the general population Brian J. O'Leary and John C. Norcross Mental status examination Robert W. Baker & Paula T. Trzepacz Improving diagnostic and clinical interviewing Rhonda S. Karg and Arthur N. Wiens Clinical purposes of the Multimodal Life History Inventory Arnold A. Lazarus and Clifford N. Lazarus Key principles in the assessment of psychotherapy outcome Michael J. Lambert and Kara Cattani-Thompson Increasing the accuracy of clinical judgment (and thereby treatment effectiveness) David Faust Adult Neuropsychological assessment Aaron Nelson and Margaret O'Connor Developmental neuropsychological assessment Jane Holmes Bernstein, Betsy Kammerer, Penny Prather and Celiane Rey-Casserly Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder through the life span Robert J. Resnick Assessment of suicidal risk Kenneth S. Pope and Melba J. T. Vasquez Clinical assessment of defense mechanisms Phebe Cramer Ego strength and ego development: Assessment and clinical application Le X. Hy Assessment of malingering on psychological measures: A synopsis Richard Rogers Conceptualization and assessment of secondary gain Richard Rogers and Vianey R. Reinhardt Identification and assessment of alcohol problems Linda C. Sobell and Mark B. Sobell Posttraumatic stress disorder in adults William F. Flack, Jr and Terence M. Keane Measures of acculturation Juan Carlos Gonzalez Interviewing parents Carolyn S. Schroeder and Betty N. Gordon Medical evaluation of children with behavioral or developmental disorders James L. Lukefahr DSM-IV Multiaxial system Axis V: Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) Scale Child and adolescent diagnosis with DSM-IV Stuart M. Goldman Clinical assessment of ethnic minority children using the DSM-IV Ronn Johnson Normal medical laboratory values and measurement conversions Gerald P. Koocher and Samuel Z. Goldhaber

Part II: Psychological testing Clinical scales of the MMPI-2 John R. Graham Assessing MMPI-2 profile validity James N. Butcher

Empirical interpretation of the MMPI-2 codetypes James N. Butcher Characteristics of high and low scores on the MMPI-2 clinical scales John R. Graham Using the MMPI-2 in assessing alcohol or drug abuse Roger L. Greene Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI-III) Theodore Millon and Roger D. Davis Thumbnail guide to the Rorschach inkblot method Barry A. Ritzler Rorschach differentiation of schizophrenia and affective disorder Irving B. Weiner Measures of children's psychological development Karen Levine Child behavior observations Janice Ware Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) Theodore Millon and Roger D. Davis Assessing the quality of a psychological

testing report Gerald P. Koocher Types of test scores and their percentile equivalents Thomas P. Hogan Popular psychological tests Pamela Brouillard Sources of information about psychological tests Thomas P. Hogan Publishers of psychological and psychoeducational tests John C. Norcross

Part III: Psychotherapy and treatment Patients' rights in psychotherapy Dorothy W. Cantor Sample psychotherapist-patient contract Eric A. Harris and Bruce E. Bennett Client-therapist compatibility Sam S. Hill III Choice of treatment format John F. Clarkin Compendium of current psychotherapy treatment manuals Michael J. Lambert, Jeremy A. Chiles, Shelli R. Kesler and David A. Vermeersch Empirically validated treatments Dianne L. Chambless Thumbnail systematic assessment and treatment matching Larry E. Beutler and Oliver B. Williams Psychotherapy treatment plan writing Arthur E. Jongsma, Jr. Stages of change: Prescriptive guidelines for behavioral medicine and psychotherapy James O. Prochaska, Carlo C. Diclemente and John C. Norcross Enhancing adherence Mireika Kobayashi, Thomas P. Smith and John C. Norcross Early termination and

referral of clients in psychotherapy Manferd D. Koch Guidelines for relapse prevention Lisa J. Roberts and G. Alan Marlatt Play therapy Charles E. Schaefer Child sexual abuse: Treatment issues Kathryn Kuehnle Principles of treatment with the behaviorally disordered child Esther Calzada, Arwa Aamiry and Sheila M. Eyberg Psychological interventions in childhood chronic illness Robert J. Thompson, Jr. and Kathryn E. Gustafson Guidelines for conducting adolescent psychotherapy Alice K. Rubenstein Guidelines for conducting couple and family therapy Jay L. Lebow Treating high-conflict couples Susan Heitler Treatment of marital infidelity Don-David Lusterman Principles of brief and time-effective therapies Brett N. Steenbarger and Simon H. Budman Treatment and management of the suicidal patient Bruce Bongar Crisis intervention Kenneth France Impact of disasters Eric M. Vernberg and R. Enrique Varela Key

principles in the treatment of borderline personality disorder John F. Clarkin and Pamela A. Foelsch Psychotherapy with reluctant and involuntary clients Stanley L. Brodsky Treatment matching in substance abuse Carlo C. Diclemente Motivational interviewing Theresa B. Moyers Anxiety/anger management training Richard M. Suinn Psychological interventions in adult disease management Carol D. Goodheart Thumbnail guide to medical crisis counseling Irene S. Pollin and Gerald P. Koocher Assessing and treating normative male alexithymia Ronald F. Levant Assessing and treating male sexual dysfunction Joseph Lopiccolo and Lynn M. Van Male Assessing and treatment female sexual dysfunction Joseph Lopiccolo and Lynn M. Van Male Psychotherapy with clients recovering memories of childhood trauma Laura S. Brown Hypnosis, imagery and suggestion: Do's and do not's Ray William London Group psychotherapy: An interpersonal approach Victor J. Yalom Assessing and reducing risk of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus Michael P. Carey Guidelines for treating women in psychotherapy Susan L. Williams-Quinlan Assessment and treatment of lesbians,

gay men, and bisexuals Robin A. Buhrke and Douglas C. Haldeman Psychotherapy with older adults Margaret Gatz and Bob G. Knight Refusal skills training Robert Henley Woody and Jennifer Kate Henley Woody APSAC study guides Jeannie Baker and Sam S. Hill, III Practice guidelines for major disorders Sam S. Hill, III Therapist self-care checklist James D. Guy, Jr. and John C. Norcross

Part IV: Pharmacotherapy Adult psychopharmacology 1: Common usage Joseph K. Belanoff, Charles Debattista and Alan F. Schatzberg Adult psychopharmacology 2: Side effects and warnings Elaine Orabona Pediatric psychopharmacology Timothy E. Wilens, Thomas J. Spencer and Joseph Biederman

Part V: Ethical and legal issues American Psychological Association's ethical principles of psychologists and code of conduct Guide to dealing with licensing board and ethics complaints Gerald P. Koocher and Patricia Keith-Spiegel Defending against legal complaints Robert Henley Woody Basic principles for dealing with legal liability risk situations Gerald P. Koocher Dealing with subpoenas Gerald P. Koocher Involuntary psychiatric hospitalization (civil commitment): Adult and child Stuart A. Anfang and Paul S. Appelbaum Sexual feelings, actions, and dilemmas in psychotherapy Kenneth S. Pope Expert testimony: Deposition versus courtroom Geoffrey R. McKee Mental health records Gerald P. Koocher Privacy, confidentiality, and privilege Gerald P. Koocher CONTENTS TRUNCATED diagnostic codes & practice guidelines & treatment principles & checklists for psychologists, reference material  ========================================

 

Title: Change in relationship status following traumatic brain injury.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Wood, Rodger L1.; Yurdakul, Levent K.

Source/Citation: Brain Injury; Vol 11(7) Jul 1997, US: Taylor & Francis; 1997, 491-502

Abstract/Review/Citation: Examined how frequently relationships break down in the years following traumatic brain injury (TBI)to determine whether separation is a legacy of head trauma and whether it is related to severity of injury, age of the couple, the duration of relationships, presence of children, or time since injury among 131 adults with TBI. Demographic data

provided information on age, date of injury, relationship status at time of injury, and length of posttraumatic amnesia. Data on Ss' current relationship status was obtained through neuropsychological interviews or postal inquiry.  Results show that (1) 49% of Ss had divorced or separated from their partners

during a 5-8 yr period following brain injury; (2) the presence of children under 15 yrs old did not have a stabilizing effect on the relationship; and (3) in general, partners of head-injured Ss in the long relationships (15+ yrs) were more accepting of the changes in their partner as a result of the TBI and did not see separation as an option. ========================================

 

Title: Transformation of perception of trauma by child survivors of the Holocaust in group therapy.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Tauber, Yvonne; van der Hal, Elisheva

Source/Citation: Journal of Contemporary Psychotherapy; Vol 27(2) Sum 1997, US: Kluwer Academic Publishers; 1997, 157-171

Abstract/Review/Citation: Intensive work with child survivors of the Holocaust has made us aware of the clinical importance of understanding the ways children perceive their traumas and the conclusions they draw about how they must live their lives. When these perceptions are transformed congruently with the child's development, the survivors can cope quite well. In this paper the authors refer to now middle-aged survivors who are still guided by their child perceptions. The use of conjoint group psychotherapy to facilitate processes of transformation even at this late stage is described. The model provided for trauma work with Holocaust survivors whose traumatization occurred decades ago may well provide tools to reduce future suffering of children who are victims of massive traumatization today. Three case illustrations are presented. ========================================

 

Title: Adolescent psychiatry, Vol. 21:  Developmental and clinical studies.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Flaherty, Lois T.; Horowitz, Harvey A.

Source/Citation: Hillsdale, NJ, US: The Analytic Press, Inc; 1997, (xv, 505) Annals of the Amerian Society for Adolescent Psychiatry.

Abstract/Review/Citation: This volume of Adolescent Psychiatry begins with a section of papers that covers aspects of adolescent development and psychopathology.  Topics explored by the contributors include: adolescents and authority; adolescents and disaster; adolescent awareness of the past;

adolescent daughters of divorce; parent loss; adolescent schizophrenia; and adolescent mood disorders.  Sections on assessment, issues in psychotherapy, and training round out a balanced survey of the field.  This volume is intended for child and adolescent therapists and all students of early development.

Notes/Comments:  In memoriam:  Richard C. Marohn (1934-1995) In memoriam:  Herman D. Staples (1918-1994)

Part I. Development and psychopathology A hierarchical model of adolescent development:  Implications for psychotherapy Charles M. Jaffe The awareness of the past in adolescence Claude Villeneuve Adolescence, authority, and change Philip Katz Adolescents and disaster Max Sugar Breaking up or breaking away:  The struggle around autonomy and individuation among adolescent daughters of divorce Elizabeth Perl Parent loss in childhood and adult psychopathology Benjamin Garber Thought disorders in adolescent schizophrenia:  Toward an integrative model John Port, Martin Harrow, Thomas Jobe and Darin Dougherty The family perceptions of young adults with putative risk for schizophrenia Linda M. Perosa, Robert Simons and Sandra L. Perosa Adolescent mood disorders Lynn E. Ponton

Part II. Assessment Hearing the S.O.S.:  Assessing the lethality of a youth in distress Ghislaine D. Godenne Use of structured assessment tools in clinical practice Mark D. Weist and Mary E. Baker-Sinclair On the uses and misuses of psychoeducational evaluations Jonathan Cohen

Part III. Issues in psychotherapy Adolescent analyzability reconsidered Michael G. Kalogerakis Failures in everyday psychotherapy Richard C. Marohn Self psychology perspectives on adolescents Gustavo Lage The psychotherapeutic

pathway to adaptive individuation for adolescents confronting conflict Paul V. Trad

Part IV. Interventions for violence and trauma Intervening against violence in the schools Mark D. Weist and Beth S. Warner The game's the thing: Play psychotherapy with a traumatized young adolescent boy Steven M. Weine

Part V. Special section on training Report of the Accreditation Council on Fellowships in Adolescent Psychiatry Richard Rosner Adolescent psychiatry training:  Guidelines for child and adolescent psychiatry residents, general psychiatry residents, and medical students Robert L. Hendren, Marie Armentano,

Simeon Grater, Edwin J. Mikkelsen, Richard Sarles and Adrian Sondheimer The authors Contents of volume 1-20 Index issues of development & psychopathology & assessment & psychotherapy in adolescent psychiatry ========================================

 

Title: Out of darkness:  Contemporary perspectives on family violence.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Kantor, Glenda Kaufman; Jasinski, Jana L.

Source/Citation: Thousand Oaks, CA, US: Sage Publications, Inc; 1997, (xi, 332)

Abstract/Review/Citation: This volume addresses new developments in knowledge and proposes new solutions to some of the most complex questions related to the field of family violence. Professionals and researchers in child welfare, mental health, and criminal justice fields will want to read this book to keep up with the latest controversial topics: international studies; theory, methods, assessment, and interventions; and ethical and cultural issues related to both child and partner abuse.  Chapters address pressing questions such as: Is wife abuse declining? Are child homicides increasing?  Does couple

treatment work in violent marriages?  From this volume several noteworthy findings emerge, including the wide variations in the forms, types, and consequences of abuse; the need for support and change in both victim and batterer behaviors; the overdue move toward expertise and sensitivity when dealing with affected populations; and much more.  This is a book for advanced students, researchers, practitioners, activists, and policymakers concerned with any or all aspects of family violence.

Notes/Comments:  Introduction [by] Glenda Kaufman Kantor

and Jana L. Jasinski

Part I: The prevalence of family violence Change in cultural norms approving marital violence from 1968 to 1994 Murray A. Straus, Glenda Kaufman Kantor and David W. Moore The homicides of children and youth: A developmental perspective David Finkelhor An examination of physical assault

and childhood victimization histories within a national probability sample of women Terri L. Weaver, Dean G. Kilpatrick, Heidi S. Resnick, Connie L. Best and Benjamin E. Saunders

Part II: Child abuse and neglect Pandemic outcomes: The intimacy variable Evvie Becker-Lausen and Sharon Mallon-Kraft Pornography and the organization of intra- and extrafamilial child sexual abuse: A conceptual model Catherine Itzin Black mothers' emotional and behavioral responses to the sexual abuse of their children Claudia Bernard Children's exposure to marital aggression: Direct and mediated effects Gayla Margolin and Richard S. John The effects of neglect on academic achievement and disciplinary problems: A developmental perspective Kathleen A. Kendall-Tackett and John Eckenrode The Traumatic Events Screening Inventory: Assessing trauma in children Jason H. Edwards and Karen C. Rogers Measuring physical and

psychological maltreatment of children with the Conflict Tactics Scales Murray A. Straus and Sherry L. Hamby Methodological issues in classifying maltreatment: An examination of "protective issue" children Heather N. Taussig and Alan J. Litrownik

Part III: Wife abuse Attitudes as explanations for aggression against family members Sharon D. Herzberger and Quentin H. Rueckert Woman battering: A comparative analysis of Black and White women Janice Joseph Surviving abuse dating relationships: Processes of leaving, healing, and moving on Karen H. Rosen and Sandra M. Stith Social predictors of wife assault cessation Etiony Aldarondo and Glenda Kaufman Kantor Wife abuse in intact couples: A review of couples treatment programs Pamela D. Brown and K. Daniel O'Leary Expanding batterer program evaluation Edward W. Gondolf Feminist therapy for battered women: An assessment Maryse Rinfret-Raynor and Solange Cantin Controlling domestic violence: Victim resources and police intervention JoAnn L. Miller and Amy C. Krull Collaboration between researchers and advocates Edward W. Gondolf, Kersti

Ylloe and Jacquelyn Campbell

Part IV: Ethical and cultural issues in family violence Ethical issues in trauma research: The evolution of an empirical

model for decision making Elana Newman, Danny G. Kaloupek, Terence M. Keane and Susan F. Folstein Ethical dimensions of intervention with violent partners: Priorities in the values and beliefs of practitioners Gilles Rondeau, Jocelyn Lindsay, Ginette Beaudoin and Normand Brodeur Conducting ethical cross-cultural research on family violence Lisa Aronson Fontes Name index Subject index About the editors About the contributors prevalence & evaluation & treatment of & ethical & cultural issues in family violence & wife & child abuse & neglect  ========================================

 

Title: Conversations in self psychology.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Goldberg, Arnold

Source/Citation: Hillsdale, NJ, US: The Analytic Press, Inc; 1997, (xix, 397) Progress in self psychology, Vol. 13.

Abstract/Review/Citation: This volume provides examples of the very type of clinically grounded theorizing that represents progress in psychoanalytic self psychology. The book provides a broad survey of clinical, supervisory, sexual, therapeutic and applied topics related to psychoanalytic self psychology.

Notes/Comments:  Contributors Introduction [by] Joseph Lichtenberg

I: Clinical Compensatory structures: Paths to the restoration of the self Marian Tolpin "Compensatory" or "primary": An alternative view. Discussion of Marian Tolpin's "Compensatory Structures: Paths to the Restoration of the Self" James L. Fosshage Response to

Fosshage Marian Tolpin Listening/experiencing perspectives and the quest for a facilitating responsiveness James L. Fosshage Optimal responsiveness and analytic listening: Discussion of James L. Fosshage's "Listening/Experiencing Perspectives and the Quest for a Facilitating Responsiveness" Howard A. Bacal Walking into the eye of the storm: Encountering "repressed memories" in the therapeutic context Amy Eldridge Mature selfobject experience George Hagman The shame experiences of

the analyst Ruth Stein The nondifficult patient and the nondifficult analyst: Resolving the impasse of intersubjective pseudoconjunction Marc L. Miller

II: Supervision From parallel process to developmental process: A developmental/plan formulation approach to supervision Thomas Rosbrow The

drift toward contemporary self psychology: Supervision on the cusp of a change in theory Kenneth L. Koenig

III: Sexuality The self and orientation: The case of Mr. G R. Dennis Shelby Discussion of Shelby's "The Self and Orientation: The Case of Mr. G" Brenda Clorfene Solomon The self in orientation: Issues of female homosexuality Betsy Kassoff A discussion of lesbians and psychoanalytic culture and a response to Kassoff's treatment of a homosexual woman Sharone Abramowitz The leather princess: Sadomasochism as the rescripting of trauma scenarios Doris Brothers

IV: Therapy Lonely as a cloud: Finding daffodils in the house of terror. Transference and countertransference in drama therapy with a ten-year-old boy Rosalind Kindler An intersubjective

approach to conjoint family therapy David Shaddock Restoring complexity to the subjective worlds of profound abuse survivors Lisa Hirschman

V: Applied The evil self of the serial killer Annette Lachmann and Frank M. Lachmann Sandor Ferenczi and the evolution of a self psychology framework in psychoanalysis Arnold Wm. Rachman The prostitute in the film "Klute": A self-psychological analysis Gordon A. Schulz Author index Subject index clinical & supervisory & sexual & therapeutic & applied issues in psychoanalytic self psychology ========================================

 

Title: A developmental perspective on the childhood impact of crime, abuse, and violent victimization.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Finkelhor, David; Kendall-Tackett, Kathy

Source/Citation: Developmental perspectives on trauma:  Theory, research, and intervention., Rochester, NY, US: University of Rochester Press; 1997, (xvii, 613), 1-32 Rochester symposium on developmental psychology, Vol. 8. Source editor(s): Cicchetti, Dante (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: In this chapter, the authors propose the concept of developmental victimology, the study of the diverse victimizations of children, including crime, child abuse, and other violence, across the various stages of development. The field has 2 major branches: one that analyzes how risks for various victimizations change developmentally, and the second how the impact of victimization changes over the course of childhood. This chapter is primarily devoted  to the 2nd issue. After briefly summarizing the field, the authors distinguish the approach of developmental victimology from other approaches to studying the impact of victimization, and delineate 4 dimensions along which developmental differences in impact might be tracked.  The Developmental Dimensions Model is intended to highlight the elements of the victimization response process that are most affected by developmental

changes. These 4 dimensions--appraisal, developmental task, coping strategy, and environmental buffers are those domains which best encompass the developmental differences that have been noted in the literature on victimization.  ========================================

 

Title: Toward an integrative theory of trauma: A dynamic-maturation approach.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Crittenden, Patricia McKinsey

Source/Citation: Developmental perspectives on trauma:  Theory, research, and intervention., Rochester, NY, US: University of Rochester Press; 1997, (xvii, 613), 33-84 Rochester symposium on developmental psychology, Vol. 8.

Source editor(s): Cicchetti, Dante (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: Trauma is one possible response to extreme and extraordinary threat. As a consequence, it is often treated as requiring a special body of knowledge for both prevention and treatment. In this chapter, the author takes an alternative perspective in which trauma is considered to be one point on a continuum of response to threat. From this perspective, danger is considered to be a part of every life, with moments of crisis punctuating the more ordinary flow of events. The continuum ranges from adaptation that is protective to learned helplessness in which one ceases futile attempts to protect oneself. In between are various defensive strategies some of which can be considered indicative of a mental state of

trauma.  Topics addressed in the chapter include: attachment theory and an integrative approach, evolution and the biology of organization around danger, developmental change in processing information and constructing protective strategies, individual differences in using information about danger and protection, the process of adaptation to crisis events, examples of variation

in the process of adaptation, and treatment.  ========================================

 

Title: "You wouldn't want to live like that . . ."

Author(s)/Editor(s): Banja, John D.

Source/Citation: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation; Vol 12(6) Dec 1997, US: Aspen Publishers Inc; 1997, 92-97

Abstract/Review/Citation: Discusses issues raised by a case in which the wife of a man who had previously indicated that he wished to be allowed to die if he ever fell into a vegetative state was opposed in her efforts to honor his wish following his catastrophic brain injury by family members and disability groups. Issues discussed include the nature of personality changes and

individual identity following traumatic brain injury and the ethics of decision making in such cases. ========================================

 

Title: The lived experience of recovery from sexual abuse for young adult women.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Crandall, Joanne Margaret

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities & Social Sciences; Vol 58(6-A) Dec 1997, US: University Microfilms International; 1997, 2084

Abstract/Review/Citation: The purpose of this study was to provide an in-depth description of the lived experience of recovery for young adult women who had been sexually abused as children. Nine women participated in the study. In order to be a part of the study, the women were between the ages of 16 and 25 at the time of the first interview, and had been sexually abused before the age of 12 by a family member. Family members could include parents, step-parents, siblings, step-siblings, grandparents, aunts, uncles, and cousins. The sexual abuse must have been repetitive in nature and lasted for a period of 6 months or longer. The women had also participated in some type of therapy, for at least 6 months, where sexual abuse was the primary focus. As well, the women had some awareness that they were in recovery and were able to talk about their own experience of recovery. The interviews and the data

analysis followed a phenomenological approach. The researcher conducted four interviews with each participant over a twenty month period. Ten common themes representing the lived experience of recovery from sexual abuse for young adults women emerged. The lived experience of recovery (1) involves working through the denial of being sexually abused, (2) diminishes the lasting effects of sexual abuse, (3) helps the person move from a victim stance to a survivor stance, (4) is a journey of self-discovery, (5) fosters the possibility for improved relationships with family members, friends, and partners, (6) reduces the negative influence of the perpetrator, (7) encompasses a variety of therapeutic encounters, (8) helps the person to explore the ambiguity of memory, (9) influences future direction, and (10) is a complex process with no clear resolution. The description of each theme illustrate how the women were able to confront and transform the trauma of being sexually abused. The findings of this study describe how young adult

women perceive the lived experience of recovery and illuminate what needs to take place so that recovery is possible. The lived experience of recovery is an interactive phenomenon which requires the women to explore the meaning of recovery both intrapersonally and interpersonally. As the women's thoughts, perceptions, beliefs, feelings, and expectations change internally, the ways in which they interact with the world around them shift as well. The lived experience of recovery is both complex and perplexing. The findings from this study offer recommendations for counselling research and practice in the area of sexual abuse for young adult women. ========================================

 

Title: Families in recovery:  Coming full circle.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Brooks, Carolyn Seval; Rice, Kathleen Fitzgerald

Source/Citation: Baltimore, MD, US: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co; 1997, (xvi, 333)

Abstract/Review/Citation: Sharing compelling family stories and key information about child development, family systems theory, addiction, and recovery, the authors demonstrate the effective, family-focused intervention techniques developed in their combined 35 yrs of practice in early childhood education,

child development, substance abuse treatment, pediatric nursing, and psychiatric nursing. Motivational techniques and stress reducers for professionals are also provided.  This . . . book speaks to substance abuse professionals, educators, policy makers, parents, and anyone else who works with or cares about families.

Notes/Comments:  About the authors Forewords [by] Norma

Finkelstein and Steven Parker Preface For the reader Acknowledgments

I: One in eight Addiction: A cunning and baffling disease The family as a system Through a child's eyes: A look at early childhood development The impact of addiction

on the family Special issues in the addicted family system: In utero drug exposure, HIV infection, and the effects of violence and trauma

II: Progress, not perfection Recovery: A journey of growth and change Everybody finds their power: Supporting resiliency in children and families Treatment for substance abuse and addiction Family-focused treatment: Interventions for families

affected by substance abuse "Burned out": Support for professionals working with families affected by substance abuse A: Family diagram B: Taking a history of substance use C: Bibliography of children's books D: Groups, organizations, and resources E: The 12 steps of recovery Index family focused

interventions for substance abuse ========================================

 

Title: Silence and survival: Working with strategies of denial in families of traumatized pre-school children.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Almqvist, Kjerstin; Broberg, Anders G.

Source/Citation: Journal of Child Psychotherapy; Vol 23(3) Dec 1997, England: Routledge Journals; 1997, 417-435

Abstract/Review/Citation: Silence and denial about previous traumatic experiences are common features in families exposed to organized violence. Mutual protection between family members, and especially between parents and children, is seen as the fundament for the silencing of traumatic experiences.

This strategy is suggested to have adaptive advantages in dangerous situations in general, where it serves the function of saving the child's internal representations of his/her parents as secure bases. If, however, the dangerous situation escalates and a psychic trauma cannot be avoided, the strategy of

mutual silence concerning the event(s) becomes an obstacle for giving traumatized children parental support and professional treatment. It is argued that clinicians need to take seriously the strong reasons families have for upholding their strategy of denial, if they want to help traumatized families to a better functioning. A case presentation involving a 4-yr-old girl from the former Yugoslavia is made to illustrate how it is possible to use refugee children's re-enacting play as a source of information about past traumatic events in order to change destructive post-traumatic family dynamics and improve parental support to the child. ========================================

 

Title: A longitudinal study of the impact of acute pediatric trauma on the stress factors and coping patterns of the family.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Naylor, Deborah Johnson

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences & Engineering; Vol 57(1-B) Jul 1996, US: Univ. Microfilms International; 1996, 0241

Abstract/Review/Citation: The purpose of the study was threefold for families whose child experienced an acute traumatic injury: (a) to identify the prominent stress factors and usual coping patterns of families over time, (b) to describe family situational/demographic variables which can influence the family's response (family functioning level, actual severity of illness and SES), and (c) to examine the changes over time in the family's stress/coping patterns and the parental perception of illness severity. Data were collected from 32 primary parental caretakers whose child was admitted with a blunt traumatic injury to one of two urban university Pediatric trauma centers. The family's response to trauma was assessed at three district periods following the injury: (a) 24-72 hrs, (b) 25-45 days, and (c) 80-100 days using correlational repeated measures design. The subjects were: (a) primarily of African American (48.5%) and Caucasian (42.4%) races; (b) predominately mothers (91%) with a high school diploma/equivalent (51%); and (c) of low to

middle to middle family social strata (57.4%). Each subject completed assessment tools designed to measure the impact of trauma on family stress/coping patterns (Parental Stressor Scale and F-COPES), parental perception of illness severity (Parental Perception of Seriousness of Illness Ladder), and demographic/situational variables (Family APGAR, Posttraumatic

Functional Rating Scale, Abbreviated Injury Scale). Analysis of the findings revealed a significant change across time in stress/coping patterns and parental perception of illness severity. Parental stress significantly increased from Period 1 to Period 2 and significantly decreased from Period 2 to Period 3. Significant family stressors at Period 1 and 2 were ineffective staff communication, and parental role changes. Significant stressors at Period 3 were alterations in issues in family life and behavioral/emotional responses in the child. Family coping significantly increased across all three Periods. ========================================

 

Title: Systemic effects of sexual abuse survivors' group therapy: Survivors, male partners, and the couple relationship.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Bacon, Brenda Lee

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities & Social Sciences; Vol 57(2-A) Aug 1996, US: University Microfilms International; 1996, 0863

Abstract/Review/Citation: Two primary goals guided this study: (1) to explore relationships among adult female sexual abuse survivors' family of origin problems, sexual abuse characteristics, and current life difficulties, and to determine factors predicting treatment outcomes in time-limited group therapy; and (2) to explore the nature of relationships between survivors' and their male partners' changes in psychosocial functioning and relationship adjustment over the course of group therapy. The study was a correlational design with pretest and posttest involving subjects from six practice settings in the

United States and Canada. Multiple measures were used to evaluate changes in individuals' psychosocial functioning and couples' relationship adjustment. The size of the sample of survivors was 51; of couples, 18. Systemic factors examined in relation to survivors' treatment outcomes included relationship

status, and problems identified in current family and family of origin functioning. The most striking finding was that having a physically abusive mother during childhood was significantly related to adult eating disorders, adult suicide attempts, and physical abuse in current relationships, and predicted Trauma Symptom Checklist pretest and change scores. Another significant finding was that the number of problems experienced by male partners in current relationships predicted change scores on the Index of Self-Esteem. Systemic effects were evident between survivors and their male partners over the course of group therapy. Improvements in survivors' self-esteem, depression, and trauma symptoms were related to increases in

their male partners' depression. Increases in survivors' marital adjustment were associated with decreased anxiety for their male partners. Improvements in survivors' self-esteem were related to increases in their marital adjustment and decreases in marital discord. This study contributes to the growing body of research suggesting that disfunction in the family  ========================================

 

Title: Recovery from trauma in close relationships.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Dehart, Dana Denise

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences & Engineering; Vol 57(4-B) Oct 1996, US: Univ. Microfilms International; 1996, 2943

Abstract/Review/Citation: While previous research has focused upon intrapersonal and societal aspects of domestic violence, the present study elaborates upon interpersonal issues in healing. Using attachment theory as a theoretical framework, we examine how an individual learns to trust or not to trust after

experiencing violation in close relationships. We explore how survivors of domestic abuse may consequently move toward or away from relationships, and how survivors may respond to subsequent partners. Participants were 86 women who had previously filed domestic assault charges against romantic partners. These women completed a brief paper-and-pencil survey, and some women participated in follow-up interviews with the experimenter. Results indicated that attachment orientation may change as a function of physical and psychological abuse in relationships. Women who were currently involved with abusive partners-tended to report fearful attachment orientations, while women who had escaped abusive relationships seemed to move through a stage of dismissing attachment, followed by more secure attachment. Movement toward secure attachment was associated with experience in positive, nonviolent relationships. Implications for work with battered women, as well as for attachment theory in general, are discussed. ========================================

 

Title: Anomie and identification: Adjustment experiences of recent immigrants from mainland China in Toronto.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Zhang, Gloria Rong

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities & Social Sciences; Vol 57(4-A) Oct 1996, US: University Microfilms International; 1996, 1507

Abstract/Review/Citation: This dissertation investigates the adjustment experiences of 80 immigrants from Mainland China in Toronto utilizing a structured personal interview technique. The major issues of this study were developed from recognized theoretical principles not applied in earlier immigrant studies. Accepting Durkheim's contention that sudden social change impedes the effective functioning of individuals in society, it was proposed that the immigrant perceives the mainstream Canadian society and its cultural settling as incomprehensible, unpredictable and even hostile. The result is personal anomie. The concept of anomie was reformulated to specifically reflect the post-arrival traumatic experience of racially and culturally different immigrants from developing countries. A new measure based on Srole's anomie scale was devised to reflect this experience. The theoretical approach applied further encompasses the contention that revised identification

patterns may determine the immigrant's resocialization and therefore influence the direction and quality of the integration process. This issue was investigated through theoretical categories based on contemporary theory, supplemented by qualitative information. The results indicate that the effects

of resettlement trauma, in particular anomie, were contained reasonably well, possibly as the result of strong family ties, suggesting retreatism in the sense of Merton. The experiences of the group only marginally conformed to the results of a number of prior studies, which stress that the institutional completeness of ethnic organizations and facilities as well as residential

concentration are important to implement and sustain ethnic group integration. Although the respondents largely lived in Chinese dominated areas and relied substantially on Chinese social and economic support, the majority regard these two features as transitional accommodating facilities rather than

expressions of ethnic attachment and emotional commitment.

========================================

 

Title: The trauma organized system of working with family violence.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Bentovim, Arnon

Source/Citation: Forensic psychotherapy:  Crime, psychodynamics and the offender patient, Vol. 2:  Mainly practice., Bristol, PA, US: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, Ltd; 1996, (715), 291-311 Forensic focus series, No. 1.

Source editor(s): Cordess, Christopher (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: in recent years there has been a major concern about the inequalities and violations which are an inherent part of family life / from a feminist gender-based perspective, violence, incest and other forms of family violence are not seen as a symptom of a malfunctioning family, but as the expression of societal views about women and children as appropriate objects for abuse and violence / integrate factors known about family violence / develop a meaningful contemporary approach to both assessment and treatment,

which includes individual and family issues in a societal context /

explanatory models to describe violent and abusive families

[psychopathological explanations, socio-cultural models--ecological explanations, social-interactional explanations] / trauma organized systems--an account of family violence patterns [physical and emotional abuse, avoidant patterns, re-enacting or reversing patterns, disorganized patterns] /

sexual abuse / abuse within partnerships [to be a battered wife] / therapeutic work with violent families--breaking the denial process [externalizing conversations] / assessment for treatment [responsibility for the abuse, the ability to put the needs of the victim first, recognition of the need for help for long-standing problems] / potential for change observed [cooperation with professionals, assessment of attitudes to family violence] / the treatment process in organized systems of family violence  ========================================

 

Title: Turmoil to turning points:  Building hope for children in crisis placements.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Kagan, Richard

Source/Citation: New York, NY, US: W. W. Norton & Co, Inc; 1996, (xviii, 270)

Abstract/Review/Citation: Richard Kagan offers hope to all those who want to help high-risk children and their families.  He shares his experience through a series of cases depicting trauma and change. . . . Interwoven in the many cases are the author's insight and knowledge about how to make placement

a turning point for children and their families.  "Turmoil to Turning Points" discusses principles and strategies that practitioners can use to guide their work. These include engaging parents of children in placement, mapping family resources, identifying split messages children hear from their family and understanding their ensuing struggle, developing centering messages to link the children with their family, mobilizing supportive networks and

creating safety plans, fostering attachments, and making visits and review conferences constructive times for change.  Dr. Kagan stresses that permanency work begins with respect for a family's strengths and struggles to survive. However, since not every family is destined to live "happily ever after," he discusses back-up plans for children who cannot go back

home.  The book closes with a look at what can be done to improve child and family services, how we can make the system work for children, families, and our communities, and how practitioners can touch a family's pain without becoming traumatized themselves.

Notes/Comments:  Preface Acknowledgments

Part one: Turmoil Solomon's quest No one heard Writing to mom Part two: Practice strategies Setting a course toward change Centering in the storm Staying the course

Part three: Turning points Speaking up Saying "no" Part four: The quest From practice to policy Building a better future Breaking through the storm

Appendix: Split message exercise References Index principles & strategies in making child crisis placements into positive turning points, high risk children & their families ========================================

 

Title: Why traumatized borderline patients relapse.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Appelbaum, Ann Halsell

Source/Citation: Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic: Special Issue: Rekindling the psychodynamic vision: From clinical practice to social action.; Vol 60(4) Fal 1996, US: Menninger Foundation; 1996, 449-463

Abstract/Review/Citation: To be freed of longstanding painful symptoms or to become capable of functioning effectively has unconscious and sometimes conscious negative connotations for patients severely traumatized by childhood sexual abuse. These include rising expectations felt as coming both from within and without; loss of a justification for receiving care; fear that

getting well invalidated the original trauma. Giving up illness may mean renouncing revenge and denying the seriousness of the childhood misery. To the extent that the torment of flashbacks and nightmares represents a continuation of the only family relationships the patient has known, losing these symptoms can feel as if being left entirely alone. The destructive impact of embittered and paranoid reactions unleashed by the therapist's recognition of, and the focus upon, the negative meanings of progress toward health. Two clinical examples that illustrate the bimodal response and patterns of relapse are provided. ========================================

 

Title: Some comments on "The silent cry" by Mona Serenius.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Coltart, Nina

Source/Citation: International Forum of Psychoanalysis; Vol 4(1) Mar 1995, Norway: Scandinavian Univ Press; 1995, 48-49.

Abstract/Review/Citation: Comments on M. Serenius's

account of her war-time experience. Patterns of traumatization appear in the defences related to separation, alienation, and frequently, the need to change language. The author compares and contrasts the Finnish experience with evacuations in the UK and criticizes postwar "scientific" reports on the data. Special reference is made to the value of the Finnish and Swedish

War-Children's Societies. ========================================

 

Title: Anxiety disorders in women.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Zerbe, Kathryn J.

Source/Citation: Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic; Vol 59(2, Suppl A) Spr 1995, US: Menninger Foundation; 1995, A38-A52

Abstract/Review/Citation: Discusses key areas affecting the occurrence of anxiety disorders in women, including medical conditions, epidemiological and diagnostic perspectives, work and the reproductive cycle, trauma (including abuse), marriage and the family, the survival advantage to anxiety and panic,

and treatment. Existing research indicates that anxiety disorders are 3 times as common in women as in men. However, true gender-based research is still in its infancy. It is noted that future research is likely to produce rapid change and reevaluation in many of these core issues. It is concluded that

both genders will benefit because evaluation and treatment can truly be tailored to the specific needs of each individual man or woman.

========================================

 

Title: A comparison of the families of mothers with borderline and nonborderline personality disorders.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Feldman, Ronald B.; Zelkowitz, Phyllis;

Weiss, Margaret; Vogel, Judy; et al

Source/Citation: Comprehensive Psychiatry; Vol 36(2) Mar-Apr 1995, US: WB Saunders & Co; 1995, 157-163

Abstract/Review/Citation: Evaluated the families of procreation of mothers with borderline personality disorder (BPD) on measures of family stability, family satisfaction, and family environment. Families of 9 BPD mothers were compared with families of 14 mothers (controls) with other personality disorders, using a semistructured interview to evaluate family trauma and resilience, the Family Environment Scale (FES), and the Family Satisfaction Scale (FSS). Families of procreation of BPD mothers were more unstable than comparison group families in terms of household composition change, school change, exposure to substance abuse, and exposure to parental suicide. FES scores of BPD mothers were significantly lower than those of control mothers in cohesion and organization, but not in conflict. Instability and low family cohesion in families of BPD mothers may place their children at increased risk for development of psychopathology.  ========================================

 

Title: Birthmothers who search: A life course perspective.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Bertrand, Ruth Eleanor

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences & Engineering; Vol 55(11-B) May 1995, US: Univ. Microfilms International; 1995, 5049

Abstract/Review/Citation: Using a life course perspective, this work examines the experience of women who have given children up for adoption. Its fundamental concerns are the relationship between life events and the birthmother's search, the impact of a too-early pregnancy on subsequent event

timing, and the birthmother's internalization of the culture's timetable for when role transitions should occur. Though search timing correlated strongly with events inducing mid-life, mortality, and loss awareness, participants more often identified influences directly related to search process or the child. Birthmothers may well need to first resolve conflicts about the relinquishment before coming to terms with life course issues. Compared to other women, birthmothers had a greater awareness of social age-norms for the timing of role status change but tended to define the cultural ideal in a broad, individualistic fashion. Birthmothers also tended to be out-of-step with population norms in their actual family, education, and career event timing patterns. While the female life cycle has been reshaped in recent years by shifts in role options and normative timing standards, the trauma of early pregnancy and child relinquishment has left the birthmother at risk for subsequent life course irregularity. Many birthmothers begin the adult life cycle having lost their sense of anticipation and expectation for role status, particularly with regard to marriage and motherhood, and are not able to use the norms provided by the culture for organizing the life course.  ========================================

 

Title: Treating marital infidelity.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Lusterman, Don-David

Source/Citation: Integrating family therapy:  Handbook of family psychology and systems theory., Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association; 1995, (xvii, 645), 259-269

Source editor(s): Mikesell, Richard H. (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: [examine] the treatment of protracted marital infidelity and then describe the traumatic effects of its discovery / suggest an intervention model that enables both members of the couple to move beyond the trauma of discovery so the ground can be prepared to explore the marital relationship and its potential for change / discuss the clinician's role in the treatment of undiscovered fidelity  ========================================

 

Title: Psychoanalytic marital therapy.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Scharff, Jill Savege

Source/Citation: Clinical handbook of couple therapy., New York, NY, US: The Guilford Press; 1995, (xi, 510), 164-193

Source editor(s): Jacobson, Neil S. (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: the psychoanalytic model of marital dysfunction [the psychoanalytic model of the mind of the individual, the psychoanalytic model applied to the 2-person system, a revised psychoanalytic model of the mind: object relations theory] / the theory of therapeutic change [the diagnostic assessment process, technique of marital therapy] / common significant clinical issues [working with the difficult couple, managing resistance and noncompliance, working with the couple when there is an affair, working with a history of trauma, handling acute marital distress, termination] ========================================

 

Title: Trauma & transformation:  Growing in the aftermath of suffering.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Tedeschi, Richard G.; Calhoun,

Lawrence G.

Source/Citation: Thousand Oaks, CA, US: Sage Publications, Inc; 1995, (x, 163)

Abstract/Review/Citation: Unique in focusing on the positive outcomes of coping with crisis, this volume helps you to understand the process of growth after trauma and apply that knowledge to the counseling relationship. Sensitizing readers to the pain experienced by people affected by trauma, the authors

weave together literature from philosophy, religion, and psychology to form a model of active coping and transformation. An essentially cognitive framework gives conceptual context to the important changes in trauma survivors' belief systems that the authors examine and upon which they build. Case examples and quotations from literary and religious sources as well as from the authors' research and clinical work articulate the coping and growth process and cultivate compassion and understanding. We hope that we have presented information in a way that is accessible to clinicians, laypersons, and . . . other people who have experienced trauma. We have also tried to summarize a

far-flung literature and describe a way of understanding the process of growth that will encourage more attention from researchers. In addition, we believe that this book can be used as a supplementary text in courses on human development, crisis intervention, and introductory courses in counseling and

psychotherapy. It is also our hope that this book will be useful as a resource for helping professionals in a variety of disciplines, including psychology, social work, psychiatry, family counseling, human services, nursing, and sociology.

Notes/Comments:  (Abbreviated) Preface The uses of

suffering: Religious and psychological roots The negative consequences of trauma Psychological growth from trauma: Research findings Personality characteristics and successful coping Tasks and cognitive processes in coping with trauma How growth happens: A model for coping with trauma Support and

intervention Research directions Guideposts for people challenged by trauma Appendix: The Post Traumatic Growth Inventory References Index About the authors active coping & personal growth & transformation, people experiencing trauma, application to counseling ========================================

 

Title: Helping the victims of disasters.

Author(s)/Editor(s): McFarlane, Alexander C.

Source/Citation: Traumatic stress:  From theory to practice., New York, NY, US: Plenum Press; 1995, (xvii, 402), 287-314 Plenum series on stress and coping.

Source editor(s): Freedy, John R. (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: examines the various ways in which mental health professionals can assist in the psychological care and rehabilitation of disaster victims [discusses] the impact of trauma upon clinical judgment and personal well-being of the professional / emphasizes the complex and evolving nature of disasters by recommending that interventions can occur at 5 phases in time ranging from before to following the disaster (planning, threat, inventory and rescue, remedy, recovery) / states that the nature of intervention will change in each time phase / discusses a biopsychosocial model for individual mental health risk or resiliency that can be considered in light of the 5 stages of intervention / appropriate assessment (interview and self-report) and treatment strategies are considered / emphasizes both prevention and treatment / [discusses] the common elements in successful mental health treatment, emphasizing a flexible clinical approach that integrates biological and psychosocial approaches / ends with a series of. . . case examples that illustrate a range of clinical concerns (e.g., brief

interventions, control issues, death, family issues, depression, emergency service personnel, and dissociative symptoms)  ========================================

 

Title: Cultural resistance:  Challenging beliefs about men, women, and therapy.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Weingarten, Kathy

Source/Citation: New York, NY, US: Harrington Park Press/Haworth Press, Inc; 1995, (167)

Abstract/Review/Citation: In everyday life--in our relationships, in various institutions, in texts--our surrounding culture influences and sometimes limits our thoughts, actions, and ideas. "Cultural Resistance" analyzes cultural constraints and encourages individuals and communities to practice cultural resistance on a daily basis, opening themselves to the discovery of diverse and suppressed knowledge.  [This book] shows general patterns by which some ideas in a culture become accepted and dominant while others are marginalized. It proposes ways for individuals and communities to resist the hold of limiting ideas on their lives. Authors ask and offer answers to the postmodern question, "What is not present in our thinking?"  The chapters in [this book] first describe cultural premises that constrain our lives [as women, men and therapists] and then develop an approach to resisting these constraints. A response follows each chapter in an effort to promote discourse, extend meanings, and encourage learning between readers. [It] gives new perspectives on the nature of social change and the relationships between individuals and culture.

Notes/Comments:  (Abbreviated) Introduction: Attending to

absence [by] Kathy Weingarten Radical listening: Challenging cultural beliefs for and about mothers  Kathy Weingarten Out of objectification: Comment on Kathy Weingarten's "Radical Listening: Challenging Cultural Beliefs for and About mothers" Laura Benkov Fathering our sons; Refathering ourselves: Some thoughts on transforming masculine legacies  Terry Real Boys

will be men: A response to Terry Real's paper Virginia Goldner Lesbian and gay parents: From margin to center  Laura Benkov Response to Laura Benkov, "Lesbian and Gay Parents: From Margin to Center" Joan Laird A narrative approach to so-called anorexia/bulimia  David Epston, Fran Morris and Rick Maisel A letter to David Epston Peggy Penn The discourse on Thomas v. Hill: A resource for perspectives on the Black woman and sexual trauma  Jessica Henderson Daniel The Hill/Thomas debate as source for understanding the Black woman and sexual trauma: A response Elaine Pinderhughes Opening therapy to conversations with a personal God  Melissa Elliot Griffith Response to "Opening Therapy to Conversations with a Personal God" Sallyann Roth From stuck debate to new conversation on controversial issues: A report from the public conversation project  Carol Becker, Laura Chasin, Richard Chasin, Margaret Herzig and Sallyann Roth Commentary on "From Stuck Debate to New Conversation on Controversial Issues: A Report from the Public Conversations Project" Michael White resistance to cultural constraints

on beliefs about men & women & therapy ========================================

 

Title: Traumatic memories: Empirical foundations, forensic and clinical implications.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Koss, Mary P.; Tromp, Shannon; Tharan, Melinda

Source/Citation: Clinical Psychology: Science & Practice; Vol 2(2) Sum 1995, England: Oxford Univ Press; 1995, 111-132

Abstract/Review/Citation: Reviews empirical research on memories for negative personal experiences among adults. The author examines basic concepts (including neural underpinnings), theoretical models of the affect-memory relationship, and data from 3 sources: victims or witnesses to crimes and atrocities, "flashbulb memories" for traumatic events, and laboratory simulations of shocking experiences. Evidence suggests that memories for traumatic experiences contain more central than peripheral detail, are reasonably accurate and well-retained for very long periods, but are not completely indelible. Assertions of eyewitness memory's vulnerability to change through suggestion have overstated the evidence. Forensic and clinical implications are discussed and a plea issued for more study of the memory phenomena that characterize posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and are the focus of trauma survivors' treatment.  ========================================

 

Title: Traumatic head injury in children.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Broman, Sarah H.; Michel, Mary Ellen

Source/Citation: New York, NY, US: Oxford University Press; 1995, (xv, 299) Description/Edition Info.: Edited Book; 140

Abstract/Review/Citation: This volume focuses on the consequences of traumatic closed head injury in children, the methods used to study these outcomes, and implications for future study and interventions. A major goal of the authors is to explore ways of identifying sources of unexplained variability in

outcome, an objective that could improve treatment and rehabilitation of head-injured children and expand our knowledge of relations between the functional and anatomic organization of the developing brain and behavior.  The purpose of this book, and the 1993 conference at the National Institute of

Neurological Disorders and Stroke from which it evolved, is to evaluate the current state of knowledge about consequences of traumatic head injury in childhood and to identify sources of variability in outcome found in studies of both severe and mild injury. For clinicians, the volume will provide easy access into the mainstream of research on traumatic brain injury in children,

its pathophysiology, treatment, and outcome. For scientists specializing in cognition and development, and for those in the basic neurosciences, the studies of traumatic brain injury discussed in this book offer a unique opportunity to relate brain structure to patterns of behavior.

Notes/Comments: Contributors

Part I: The issues Variability in outcomes after traumatic brain injury in children: A developmental perspective  Jack M. Fletcher, Linda Ewing-Cobbs, David J. Francis and Harvey S. Levin Epidemiological features of brain injury in children: Occurrence, children at risk, causes and manner of injury, severity, and outcomes  Jess F. Kraus Pathophysiological responses of the child's brain following trauma  Derek A. Bruce

Part II: The data Behavioral sequelae of serious head injury in children and adolescents: The British studies  David Shaffer Neurobehavioral outcome of pediatric closed head injury

Harvey S. Levin, Linda Ewing-Cobbs and Howard M. Eisenberg Discourse as an outcome measure in pediatric head-injured populations  Sandra Bond Chapman The UCLA study of mild closed head injury in children and adolescents  Robert F.

Asarnow, Paul Satz, Roger Light, Kenneth Zaucha, Richard Lewis and Carol McCleary Cognitive, behavioral, and motoric sequelae of mild head injury in a national birth cohort  Polly E. Bijur and Mary Haslum Attention deficits in the long term after childhood head injury  Maureen Dennis, Margaret Wilkinson, Lisa Koski and Robin P. Humphreys Recovery from traumatic brain injury in

children: The importance of the family  H. Gerry Taylor, Dennis Drotar, Shari Wade, Keith Yeates, Terry Stancin and Susan Klein Part III: Life-span effects, rehabilitation, and treatment Outcome of head injuries from childhood to adulthood: A twenty-three-year follow-up study  Harry Klonoff, Campbell Clark and Pamela S. Klonoff Recovery of function in adults: Lessons for the study of pediatric head injury outcome  Jordan Grafman and Andres Salazar Evaluating efficacy of rehabilitation after pediatric traumatic brain injury  Linda J. Michaud The prospect of pediatric clinical trials: Experience with adult trials  John David Ward

Part IV: Commentary Implications for clinical care and cognitive neuroscience Bennett A. Shaywitz A summing up Arthur Benton Index variability in outcome & pathophysiology & treatment & behavioral consequences of severe & mild traumatic head injury, children Conference Proceedings/Symposia  ========================================

 

Title: Innovations in clinical practice:  A source book, Vol. 14.

Author(s)/Editor(s): VandeCreek, Leon; Knapp, Samuel; Jackson, Thomas L.

Source/Citation: Sarasota, FL, US: Professional Resource Press/Professional Resource Exchange, Inc; 1995, (x, 506) Innovations in clinical practice:  A source book.

Abstract/Review/Citation: The 1st section [in this volume intended for mental health practitioners] deals primarily with therapeutic concerns. The various contributions, however, go beyond traditional therapeutic issues and also address important questions of assessment, as well as treatment. Issues that relate to a number of different types of clients and situations are covered.  The 2nd section addresses practice management and professional development.  The 3rd section includes assessment instruments and office forms. The assessment instruments are primarily informal and designed to assist clinicians in collecting information about clients.  The 4th section on community interventions reflects our view that mental health practitioners

have much to offer in the community beyond traditional clinical services. The material in this section will be of assistance to those who are interested in mental health consultation, education, prevention, and expanding their services to reach new and broader populations.  The 5th section . . . includes a variety of contributions that do not fit neatly into one of the

other sections.

Notes/Comments:  (Abbreviated) Preface Biographies

Introduction to the volume

Section I: Clinical issues and applications Trauma psychology: Psychological interventions in the aftermath of disaster and crisis  Elizabeth K. Carll Separating fact from fiction on the "false memory" question  Robert A. Schwarz Assessment and treatment of men who batter  L. Kevin Hamberger and Ola W. Barnett Group psychotherapy: A managed care alternative for private practice  Bonnie J. Buchele and John R. Price Conceptual models and clinical interventions for bulimia and binge eating  Linda Wilcoxon Craighead Body image disturbance: Advances in assessment and treatment  Madeline Altabe and J. Kevin Thompson Cognitive-behavioral and short-term interventions for anger and aggression  W. Robert Nay Identifying violence risk factors  R. Mark Binderman Brief cognitive-behavioral family therapy for suicidal adolescents  John C. Piacentini, Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus and Coleen Cantwell Clinical interventions for HIV-positive adolescents  Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus, Deborah A. Murphy and Michelle T. Parra Nonpharmacologic treatment of skin disorders  Richard G. Fried Self-examination therapy: Treatment for anxiety and depression  Daniel G. Bowman Smoking cessation treatment  M. Marlyne Kilbey, Robert H. Shipley, Kenneth A. Perkins and Dorothy Hatsukami Intensive short-term therapy with attachment-disordered children  Terry M. Levy and Michael Orlans

Section II: Practice management and professional development Some survival tips for dealing with insurance companies and managed care  William F. Doverspike How to prepare for a media interview  Rhea K. Farberman and Stephen J. Blommer How to handle attorney requests for psychological test data  I. Bruce Frumkin Managing your own distress: Lessons from psychotherapists healing themselves  Joan Laidig Brady, James D. Guy and John C. Norcross

Section III: Instruments and office forms The Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale (PASS) and the assessment of emotional

responses to pain  Lance M. McCracken and Richard T. Gross A Social Security Examination Form  Frank C. Seitz The Psychological Maltreatment Experience Scale (PMES): Assessing psychological maltreatment in childhood and adolescence  Patricia Petretic-Jackson, Wendi Betz and Laura J. Pitman Forms

for planning, structuring, and evaluating supervision  Nancy J. Schindler and Mary R. Talen Insurance verification and follow-up forms  D. Jean Szegedy and Terry S. Proeger

Section IV: Community interventions Preemployment screening for public safety personnel  Robin E. Inwald and Jody A. Resko How and when to conduct focus groups  Peter A. Keller Organizational change through psychology-industry partnerships  Rise VanFleet and Mark P. Zarichansky Creating and conducting workshops for effective living  Ronald E. Sharp

Section V: Selected topics An evaluation of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR)  David F. Tolin, Robert W. Montgomery, Ronald A. Kleinknecht and Jeffrey M. Lohr Therapist burnout: A self psychology and systems perspective  William N. Grosch and David C. Olsen The DSM-IV: What's

new  John A. Mills Of men and intimacy: A contextual approach  Augustus Y. Napier Introduction to the client handouts What makes kids care: Teaching gentleness in a violent world [by] American Psychological Association The Life Stress Scale [by] T. H. Holmes and R. H. Rahe Subject index to volumes 11, 12,

13, and 14 Information for contributors Continuing education assessment instruments & treatment & practice management & professional development & community interventions, mental health practitioners, handbook  ========================================

 

Title: Living with head injury.

Author(s)/Editor(s): van den Broek, Martin D.; Schady, Wolfgang; Coyne, Martin J.

Source/Citation: Manchester, England: Manchester University Press; 1995, (vi, 134) Living with.

Abstract/Review/Citation: "Living with Head Injury" provides a

comprehensive guide to the complex range of problems resulting from brain trauma. Chapters describe the causes of problems such as memory loss, personality change, muscle weakness and epilepsy, and offer positive advice as to how these problems can be minimised or overcome. The book includes guidance on how to apply for financial compensation and explains how the legal system works, as well as advice for those providing support to head injured people. The needs of families and carers are addressed, together with advice on how to cope with caring.

Notes/Comments:  (Abbreviated) Head injury: The silent

epidemic Hospital care after head injury Some physical effects of head injury Thinking and reasoning: Cognitive problems Emotions and personality change Head injury is a family affair Claiming compensation Looking to the future

Appendix 1: Useful addresses

Appendix 2: Suggestions for further reading physical & cognitive problems & recovery, head injured patients, guide  ========================================

 

Title: Perhevaekivallan diskurssit./ Discourses of family violence.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Lappalainen, Mika; Maentynen, Petri; Wahlstrom, Jarl

Source/Citation: Psykologia; Vol 30(5) 1995, Finland: Psykologia; 1995, 347-356

Abstract/Review/Citation: The article presents a discourse analytic study of counseling sessions in a shelter home for abused women. The discussions of the husband, the wife and the counselor were analyzed in order to investigate how the different positions of the model of trauma organized systems were produced within the discursive process of the meetings. The interlocutors applied a variety of interpretative repertoires in their personal rhetoric. Through the use of these repertoires, the violent incidents were minimized, the violent behavior was attributed to external causes, the responsibility of action was transferred from the victimizer to the victim, and the possibility for an outside agent to influence the course of action was neutralized. The victim was seen to have a decisive position with respect to possible interruption of the violent action pattern.  If she adhered to a passive martyr repertoire or was seduced by the victimizer's charming repertoire, no change was initiated.  If, however, she kept to her intervention into the system, initialized by the decision to come to the shelter home, a reorganization of the action system was possible. (English abstract) ========================================

 

Title: Suicide in patients with traumatic brain injury: Risk and prevention.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Klonoff, Pamela S.; Lage, Gustavo A.

Source/Citation: Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation; Vol 10(6) Dec 1995, US: Aspen Publishers Inc; 1995, 16-24

Abstract/Review/Citation: Many patients sustaining traumatic brain injury (TBI) experience multiple deficits affecting cognition, personality, and physical independence. Often there is a dramatic and permanent change in work status, income, family life, support network, and quality of life. Clinical experience indicates that this can predispose patients to significant depressive reactions and increased risk of suicide. This article describes clinical evaluation and treatment techniques that attempt to address suicide in TBI patients participating in an outpatient milieu-oriented rehabilitation program.  Historical theories and research on suicide are reviewed, and risk factors for TBI and their similarity to suicide are explored. Preliminary

clinical findings from a retrospective study of 111 TBI program participants are also provided. ========================================

 

Title: Eric: A traumatized child.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Radford, Pat

Source/Citation: Journal of Child Psychotherapy; Vol 21(2) Aug 1995, England: Routledge Journals; 1995, 207-224

Abstract/Review/Citation: The author explores the traumatic effects of ongoing interpersonal violence on the developmental process of a 3.5-year old boy. The clinical material is based on psychoanalytic five times weekly treatment of Eric over a period of three years. His external environment, including the violent aspects of his family's life, is clarified. The supportive work which

attempted to bring about environmental change is outlined. The lasting effects of the violence on Eric's personality and development are estimated, and the possible value to him of his psychoanalytic treatment is assessed. ========================================

 

Title: Coyote Returns: Twenty sweats does not an Indian expert make.

Author(s)/Editor(s): LaDue, Robin A.

Source/Citation: Women & Therapy: Special Issue: Bringing ethics alive: Feminist ethics in psychotherapy practice; Vol 15(1) 1994, US: Haworth Press Inc; 1994, 93-111

Abstract/Review/Citation: Provides a historical perspective on the trauma and loss experienced by Native people through the 500 yrs of North American colonization. Issues facing contemporary Native communities include alcoholism, mental health issues (such as depression, suicide, homicide, and child abuse), and the loss of tribal elders. Suggestions for ethical

interventions by non-Native psychological professionals include recognizing the roles of the family, community, and traditional healer in determining problems, setting behavioral standards, and deciding on treatments. To be positive agents for change, however, psychologists, psychiatrists, and social workers must not participate in activities that promote or condone the stealing and inappropriate use of spiritual activities. These professionals

must be willing to acknowledge their ignorance and avoid calling themselves "Indian experts."  ========================================

 

Title: Refugee children and violence.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Malakoff, Marguerite E.

Source/Citation: Children and violence., Northvale, NJ, US: Jason Aronson, Inc; 1994, (xiii, 217), 145-159 The child in the family: The monograph series of the International Association for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Allied Professions, Vol. 11.

Source editor(s): Chiland, Colette (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: [discuss] the adjustment and long-term development of refugee children following the trauma of [war and] their flight and resettlement / who are refugees: a few definitions / refugee children and violence [unaccompanied minors, children in refugee camps: humane deterrence, children in detention centers: Hong Kong, illegal refugees: Central Americans in the US, displaced persons: Thai-Cambodia border camps]

========================================

 

Title: Posttraumatic stress recovery of terrorist survivors.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Ayalon, Ofra

Source/Citation: International handbook of traumatic stress syndromes., New York, NY, US: Plenum Press; 1993, (xxxiii, 1011), 855-866 The Plenum series on stress and coping.

Source editor(s): Wilson, John Preston (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: [discuss] the therapeutic and diagnostic aspects of the injury in 3 out of 15 terrorist attacks which involved kidnapping and face-to-face killing of Israeli civilians in the years 1974 to 1980 / deal with the psychological harm caused by personal, communal, and societal trauma

and examine the means of therapeutic intervention / phenomenological approach to the evaluation of coping [circles of support, community support systems during a tragedy, crisis without aid, stress inoculation: preventive care, brief group therapy for a near-miss population] / mass media and

treatment [individual therapy for media-publicized bereavement] / from getting help to giving help: a role change / strategic method of short-term family therapy ========================================

 

Title: Treating alcohol problems:  Marital and family interventions.

Author(s)/Editor(s): O'Farrell, Timothy J.

Source/Citation: New York, NY, US: The Guilford Press; 1993, (xviii, 446) The Guilford substance abuse series.

Abstract/Review/Citation: This volume is a practical guide to the most up-to-date marital and family therapy practices that have been shown to be effective in treating alcohol problems. Chapters by leading clinician-researchers present practical "how to" information on research-tested methods for use at different stages of the alcoholism recovery process. Each chapter includes an overview of the specific method under consideration and detailed guidelines for implementation. Special clinical

considerations are discussed, and a summary of current knowledge regarding efficacy as well as an extensive reference list are included. Illustrative case examples are provided throughout.  "Treating Alcohol Problems" is designed for clinical psychologists, marital and family therapists, counselors, and social workers working with alcohol problems.

Notes/Comments:  Part I: Initiating change and helping the

family when the alcoholic is unwilling to seek help Unilateral Family Therapy with spouses of uncooperative alcohol abusers  Edwin J. Thomas and Richard D. Ager Community reinforcement training for families: A method to get alcoholics into treatment  Robert W. Sisson and Nathan H. Azrin Using family influence to

motivate alcoholics to enter treatment: The Johnson Institute Intervention approach  Michael R. Liepman A group program for wives of treatment-resistant alcoholics  Joan E. Dittrich

Part II: Stabilizing sobriety and relationships when the alcoholic seeks help Family treatment in short-term detoxification Richard Bale The Hazelden Residential Family Program: A combined systems and disease model approach  J. Clark Laundergan and Terence Williams A behavioral marital therapy couples group program for alcoholics and their spouses Timothy J. O'Farrell Alcohol-focused spouse involvement with behavioral marital therapy Nora E. Noel and Barbara S. McCrady Systemic couples therapy for alcohol-abusing women  Joseph L. Wetchler, Eric E. McCollum, Thorana S. Nelson, Terry S. Trepper and Robert A. Lewis Family therapy for adolescent alcohol abuse  Terry S. Trepper, Fred P. Piercy, Robert A. Lewis, Robert J. Volk and Douglas H. Sprenkle

Part III: Maintaining long term recovery and preventing relapse Behavioral contracts between alcoholics and family members:

Improving aftercare participation and maintaining sobriety after inpatient alcoholism treatment  Deborah J. Ossip-Klein and Robert G. Rychtarik Couples relapse prevention sessions after a behavioral marital therapy couples group program  Timothy J. O'Farrell Relapse prevention: A couples-therapy perspective  Barbara S. McCrady

Part IV: Future directions and concluding comments Brief couples treatment for alcohol problems  Allen Zweben and David Barrett Family intervention with the alcoholic after major injury in the

trauma center setting  Larry M. Gentilello and Patrick Duggan Conclusions and future directions in practice and research on marital and family therapy in alcoholism treatment Timothy J. O'Farrell Index marital & family therapy, alcoholic clients & their family members & spouses, guide ========================================

 

Title: Educational disadvantage in the primary school: Children living in temporary accommodation.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Lines, Susan

Source/Citation: Support for Learning; Vol 7(1) Feb 1992, England: Blackwell Publishers, Ltd.; 1992, 8-13

Abstract/Review/Citation: Discusses the educational plight of homeless children in England. Families declared homeless usually experience a change in schools.  The shunting from home to home and school to school threatens educational stability, hinders educational progress, causes emotional insecurity, and

promotes educational disadvantage. Two case studies of families experiencing the trauma of relocation are presented, and the long-term effects of homelessness are discussed. Suggestions are made for helping homeless families make the adjustment to a new school, including having a liaison between the school and homeless families unit and visits to the new school for filling out

admissions forms, discussing personal requirements of the child, and meeting the child's teacher and classmates.  ========================================

 

Title: Examining the merits of conflict resolution as an academic discipline:  Its applications to everyday real life situations in the Middle East.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Dane, Leila F.

Source/Citation: McLean, VA, US: Institute for Victims of Trauma; 1992, (x, 134)

Abstract/Review/Citation: Last November [1991] the Joint Program on Conflict Resolution held its first working conference to promote conflict resolution as an academic discipline in the Middle East in order to facilitate the modernization of mediation in that region. Organized at the request of psychiatrists from ten countries, the conference brought together U.S. and

Mideastern academicians, students and professionals from a variety of disciplines, and the press.  U.S. speakers presented on conflict resolution from the perspective of their specific expertise. Mideastern speakers addressed past or current situations within their culture that would profit from the structured expertise of conflict resolution experts.  The book is

designed to appeal to those interested in cross-cultural mediation, change and the future, comparative religion, social anthropology, the behavioral sciences, and of course, conflict resolution. Its uniqueness is the reality orientation that it can bring to a course on one of these topics. The interdisciplinary blend of theory and practice reveals the complexities of cross-cultural information exchanges of this kind which are so necessary to an interdependent world.

Notes/Comments:  Middle East (Abbreviated) Introduction

[by] Leila F. Dane Opening remarks Concepts fundamental to the peaceful resolution of group conflict: The view from a nongovernmental organization Eugene B. Brody Can classical Islamic legal theory become the source for conflict resolution in modern times? Abdulaziz A. Sachedina Hudaybiyya peace conciliation Ahmed G. M. El Azayem Islam and conflict resolution Douglas M. Johnston Some nuts and bolts of dispute resolution John B. Attanasio Beyond the destructive patterns of chosen trauma and competing victimhood Leila F. Dane The new international security order Abdelwahab Biad Finding the balance within: Survey of goals and objectives of graduate students of conflict resolution Cynthia Webster The practical aspect of introducing conflict resolution into the education system through the university Ahmed Shawky Conflict resolution and family secrets Selim Annabi Psychosocial antecedents to conflict: Effects on children and youth Abdelwahab Mahjoub and

Jacques-Philippe Leyens Community violence in Egypt and the new role of the mental health practitioner Farouk El Sendioni An interpretation of the conflicts provoked by extremists in Egypt, 1967-1991 Gamal Abou El Azayem The issue of revenge Said Abd El Azim General recommendations Closing remarks [by] Muhammed Tantawi Footnotes List of contributors examines issues related to conflict resolution in the Middle East Conference Proceedings/Symposia ========================================

 

Title: Three-dimensional image analysis of trauma-induced degenerative changes: An aid to neuropsychological assessment.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Bigler, Erin D.

Source/Citation: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology; Vol 7(5) Sep-Oct 1992, US: Pergamon Press c/o Elsevier Science Inc; 1992, 449-456

Abstract/Review/Citation: Presents a case study involving a 39-yr-old man who suffered a severe closed head injury at age 39 yrs. Three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the day of injury computerized tomography (CT) findings are presented, and the degenerative changes identified by magnetic resonance

imaging (MRI) 18 mo postinjury are noted. The method allows the clinician to examine 3D changes in the ventricular system as an aid in identifying regions of structural damage in 1 view rather than the need to view multiple images with the traditional 2-dimensional presentation of CT or MR images. In this case study the neuropsychological deficits implicated generalized

cerebrocortical dysfunction, and the 3D image analysis correspondingly indicated generalized parenchymal tissue loss.  ========================================

 

Title: Problems and changes after traumatic brain injury: Differing perceptions within and between families.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Cavallo, Marie M.; Kay, Thomas; Ezrachi, Ora

Source/Citation: Brain Injury; Vol 6(4) Jul-Aug 1992, US: Taylor & Francis; 1992, 327-335

Abstract/Review/Citation: The Problem Checklist of the NYU Head Injury Family Interview was administered to 34 people with head injuries (PHI), and a significant other (SO) of each, between 1 and 3 yrs postinjury. 31 families were divided into 3 groups: high agreement families (HAF) with high agreement between the PHI and the SO regarding problems and changes; high disagreement families (HDF-PHI) with the PHI endorsing more problems than the SO; and high disagreement families (HDF-SO) with the SO endorsing more problems than the PHI. No differences were found between these groups in age, sex, duration of coma, time since injury, educational achievement of the PHI, or the SO's relationship to the PHI. However, the HDF-PHI group tended to have a higher return-to-work rate, the SOs in the HAF group reported the highest rates of subjective burden, and groups were found to differ in types of items endorsed by the PHI vs the SOs. ========================================

 

Title: Evolutions: Research and clinical perspectives on families.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Kay, Thomas; Cavallo, Marie M.

Source/Citation: Head injury:  A family matter., Baltimore, MD, US: Paul H. Brookes Publishing; 1991, (xix, 330), 121-150

Source editor(s): Williams, Janet M. (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: this chapter is about . . . evolutions / first, the change that has taken place over time in how families have been dealt with in the professional literature on traumatic brain injury, in both formal research studies and clinical descriptions, is selectively examined / the second part of the chapter takes a more clinical perspective, and traces parallels in the process of changing self-perception and self-identity in persons with head injury, in individual family members, in the family as a system, and even at the level of national organizations / the unifying theme is evolutions: the gradual, continuous process of change whose goal is adaptation to present realities and future needs / the authors briefly describe their own work with families at New York University Medical Center, specifically the development of an instrument to track changes in families  ========================================

 

Title: Soul murder and other crimes of the heart: Familial abuse in Nathaniel Hawthorne's fictional psychodramas.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Harmon, Maryhelen C.

Source/Citation: The aching hearth:  Family violence in life and literature., New York, NY, US: Insight Books/Plenum Press; 1991, (xiii, 296), 119-134 Source editor(s): Deats, Sara Munson (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: argue that by looking closely at certain of Hawthorne's fictions that dramatize the trauma resulting from family violence, we might frame our relationships to avoid such abuse, as well as effect societal and judicial change in this all too prevalent classless crime ========================================

 

Title: The warrior heritage:  A psychological perspective of Cambodian trauma.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Bit, Seanglim

Source/Citation: El Cerrito, CA, US: Seanglim Bit; 1991, (xix, 233)

Abstract/Review/Citation: "The Warrior Heritage" is the first

scholarly effort to examine, from the Cambodian perspective, the psychological dimensions of the profound trauma referred to as the "Cambodian genocide."  This book develops a cultural context from which to better understand the ongoing traumatic events which have enveloped the Cambodian people. From previous images of a peaceful, if somewhat exotic country,

Cambodia has exploded into world consciousness in scenes of devastation, death and the "killing fields." The author explains both the psychological roots of a genocide which consumed up to 2 million victims, and the characteristics of inner strength derived from the same culture which enabled individuals to survive, and even flourish, in the aftermath of the catastrophe.

Notes/Comments:  Cambodia (Abbreviated) Acknowledgements Preface Introduction

Part one: Cultural heritage Psychological origins of national identity Development of cultural values Change in Cambodian culture

Part two: Foundations of society Organization of society Religion Political organization The family The roles of males and females Education Economy Social class Rural/urban differentiation Dissemination of information Cultural art Social behavior Authoritarianism Aggression and violence Conflict resolution Concepts of leadership Pro-social behavior Ethnic relations Oral traditions Codes of behavior Social control Reliance on counselors The trauma impact of Cambodian society Loss of self-esteem Institutions in society Corruption Interpersonal relationships State of the family Lack of healing process Acceptable outlets for rage and frustration Loss of human resources Vulnerable populations

Part three: The individual Cambodian The Cambodian

psychological behavior Child development Trust vs. non-trust Self-perception Denial of reality Pessimistic outlook Diffusion of responsibility Joyfulness vs despair Personal security Threat and fear The trauma experience and its impact on the individual Depression Conversion disorder Post traumatic stress disorder Denial Dissociation Physio-psychological defenses Aggression Avoidant behavior Conflicting disclosure The Cambodian ascendant personality The development for a just Cambodia Economic development Human rights Harmonious problem solving Foreign involvement Conclusion References Suggested readings

Appendix I: United Nations: The situation in Cambodia

Appendix II: Third Committee of Paris Conference

Appendix III: Sihanouk, Hun Sen Joint Communique Index examines the psychological dimensions of the "Cambodian

genocide"

========================================

 

Title: Twenty questions: Research needed to advance the field of careers.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Hall, Douglas Tim

Source/Citation: Contemporary career development issues., Hillsdale, NJ, US: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc; 1991, (xvii, 178), 151-167 Series in applied psychology.

Source editor(s): Morrison, Robert F. (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: centers around 20 questions that might be useful in advancing the state of theory, practice, and research [in career development] / deal with the interface between macro (organizational) activities and micro (individual) career activities / mobility: growth or crisis / career and

family / diversity in mobility rates and company growth / organizational career systems / organizational trauma: "the deal is changing" / career as transitions / needed organizational responses  ========================================

 

Title: The mixed roles of social support and social obstruction in recovery from child abuse.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Gurley, Diana

Source/Citation: Abused and battered:  Social and legal responses of family violence., Hawthorne, NY, US: Aldine de Gruyter; 1991, (xvi, 232), 89-99 Social institutions and social change.

Source editor(s): Knudsen, Dean D. (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: examines the ways intimate relationships help and obstruct recovery from childhood trauma / includes a thematic analysis of ethnographic data obtained from women who, as children, were sexually abused and battered by family members / when asked how their relationship with others

affected their ability to deal with difficult times, the women described behaviors that had been helpful to them, but they also described behaviors that obstructed their healing and impeded their recovery from trauma / the themes of social support and social obstruction that arose from their conversations are described and compared ========================================

 

Title: Children of chemically dependent parents:  Multiperspectives from the cutting edge.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Rivinus, Timothy M.

Source/Citation: Philadelphia, PA, US: Brunner/Mazel, Inc; 1991, (xxii, 364)

Abstract/Review/Citation: This book has evolved in response to a long-standing need for adequate diagnostic nosology that considers trauma and the status of being the child of a substance-abusing parent and their prognostic significance in the child's development.  Comprehensive and informative, the volume is divided into four parts--academic, diagnostic, treatment, and public-policy perspectives.  From an initial exploration of the interaction of genetics and psychosocial factors and how they influence the development of children with addicted parents to later discussions of the relationship

between codependence and other personality disorders and the proposal of a new diagnostic schemata--Chronic Trauma Disorder--the first half of the book provides an essential foundation for further investigation.  Moving from the general to the specific, Parts 3 and 4 speak to the diverse issues related

to treatment and public policy. Focused upon here are such topics as treatment of adolescent females, psychotherapy aimed at breaking the addiction cycle for individuals and families in crisis, short-term psychoeducational groups, the self-help movement, preventative measures, the present needs of this population, and the fate of the next generation.  In sum, this compelling volume will fill a glaring gap in the literature, providing professionals from a range of disciplines with current, clinically applicable information--and, it is hoped, with an expanded repertoire for working with "Children of Chemically Dependent Parents."

Notes/Comments:  Contributors Foreword by Sheila B. Blume Preface by Thomas W. Perrin Acknowledgments

Introduction

Part I. Academic perspectives Biological aspects of children of

alcoholic parents  Loretta Young Silvia and Michael R. Liepman Forgotten no longer: An overview of research on children of chemically dependent parents  Jeannette L. Johnson Young children of substance-abusing parents: A developmental view of risk and resiliency  Mary Ellin Logue and Timothy M. Rivinus Children of chemically dependent parents: A theoretical crossroads  Stephanie Brown Psychoanalytic theory and children of chemically dependent parents: Ships passing in the night?  Timothy M. Rivinus

Part II. Diagnostic perspectives The relationship between codependence and narcissism  Timmen Cermak Children in search of a diagnosis: Chronic trauma disorder of childhood David Levoy, Timothy M. Rivinus, Marilyn Matzko and James McGuire

Part III. Treatment perspectives The chemically dependent female adolescent: A treatment challenge  Dorothy M. Bianco and Susan D. Wallace Breaking the cycle: Treating adult children of alcoholics  David C. Treadway Short-term psychoeducational

group for adult children of alcoholics: Catalyst for change  Michele Clark and Noel Jette Treatment of children of substance-abusing parents: Selected developmental, diagnostic, and treatment issues  Timothy M. Rivinus An ACOA substance-abuse counselor: Family-of-origin influences on personal growth and

therapeutic effectiveness  Helga M. Matzko

Part IV. Public-policy perspectives The growing impact of the children-of-alcoholics movement on medicine: A revolution in our midst  Robert L. DuPont and John P. McGovern Policy, issues, and action: An agenda for children of substance abusers  Migs Woodside The effects of psychoactive substance abuse on the next generation: The epidemic view Timothy M. Rivinus Name index Subject index discusses issues encountered by children of chemically dependent parents from academic, diagnostic,

treatment, & public-policy perspectives ========================================

 

Title: Metaphors of organizational trauma and organizational development: A case example.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Stein, Howard F.

Source/Citation: Organization Development Journal; Vol 9(4) Win 1991, US: Organization Development Institute; 1991, 22-30

Abstract/Review/Citation: Presents a case example illustrating the meanings and affects associated with metaphors of organizational loss. In work with individuals and groups in a medical corporation following mass resignations at the management level, the author closely analyzed the metaphors used by staff. Employees were found to be expressing through their metaphors a sense of injury and grief over what was happening to their organization. It is suggested that an important part of a process consultant's task in crisis situations is to facilitate the grieving process by helping organization

members to tell and more deeply feel the story embedded in their metaphors. ========================================

 

Title: Historical trauma and male subjectivity.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Silverman, Kaja

Source/Citation: Psychoanalysis & cinema., Florence, KY, US: Taylor & Francis/Routledge; 1990, (xi, 249), 110-127 AFI film readers. Source editor(s): Kaplan, E. Ann (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: identifies history with trauma: "the social formation," . . . like Freud's psyche, "develops a 'protective shield' by means of which it guards itself against external stimulation--it develops, that is, a dominant fiction" / proceeds to demonstrate the relationship between history and representation in a close examination of William Wyler's "The Best Years Of Our Lives" (1946), which . . . is characterized by a "loss of belief in the family, small-town life, and the adequacy of the male subject"  ========================================

 

Title: Healing voices:  Feminist approaches to therapy with women.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Laidlaw, Toni Ann; Malmo, Cheryl

Source/Citation: San Francisco, CA, US: Jossey-Bass Inc, Publishers; 1990, (xxx, 335) The Jossey-Bass social and behavioral science series.

Abstract/Review/Citation: In recent years, female therapists and their clients have wrestled with the problem of how to reconcile traditional psychological theory with the real-life experiences of women. "Healing Voices" presents the results of this work. It brings together the words and experiences of many women and their therapists to present innovative approaches for helping women discover their unique selves. It describes a range of healing techniques--such as ego-state therapy, Jungian dream work, Native healing, drawing, storytelling, and others--that have been used successfully to help women solve problems ranging from parenting difficulties and compulsive eating to family violence. And at the end of each chapter, we hear the client's voice. The book will be of interest to practitioners,

individuals already in therapy, and those who are curious about or considering entering therapy. Teachers and students in various mental health fields, including counseling and clinical psychology, social work, psychiatric nursing, and psychiatry, will find the book a useful resource.

Notes/Comments:  (Abbreviated) Preface  The authors Poem [by] Patricia Perry Introduction: Feminist therapy and

psychological healing  Toni Ann Laidlaw and Cheryl Malmo

Part one: Breaking through the barriers Dispelling the myths: A workshop on compulsive eating and body image  Toni Ann Laidlaw Shattering the silence: Working with violence in native communities  Maggie Hodgson Reparenting the self: A parenting group for adult children of alcoholics  Cathy Mayhew Repairing personal boundaries: Group therapy with survivors of sexual abuse  Maureen McEvoy

Part two: Sensing our own reality More than meets the eye: Using ordinary snapshots as tools for therapy  Judy Weiser Seeds of thought, arrows of change: Native storytelling as metaphor  Yvonne Rita Dion Buffalo Reclaiming the inner child: Jungian dream analysis  Bonnelle Lewis Strickling Part three: Trusting the body's memory Voices from the silence: Use of imagery with incest survivors  Naida D. Hyde Recovering the past: Using hypnosis to heal childhood trauma  Cheryl Malmo Let my soul soar: Touch therapy  Joan Turner Part four: Healing through integration The therapeutic journey: A guide for travelers  Jan Ellis Ending the cycle of violence: Overcoming guilt in incest survivors  Diane Lepine Recreating equality: A feminist approach to ego-state therapy  Cheryl Malmo Afterword: Empowering women through the healing process

========================================

 

Title: Stressors and the adjustment disorders.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Noshpitz, Joseph D.; Coddington, R. Dean

Source/Citation: New York, NY: John Wiley & Sons; 1990, (xix, 693) Wiley series in general and clinical psychiatry.

Abstract/Review/Citation: In an effort to appraise contemporary understanding of stressors, their effects upon individuals, and current therapeutic approaches, the American Psychiatric Association, through its Task Force on Psychiatric Therapies, conducted the broad-ranging study upon which this volume is based.  Comprising contributions from more than fifty specialists in the field, "Stressors and the Adjustment Disorders" offers near-encyclopedic coverage of common sources of stress. Everything from the loss of an object to the loss of an ideal, developmental stress in the first five years, during puberty and in old age, divorce, natural disaster, forced change of environment, and many other types of stressors, are examined in detail. Each category of stressor is dealt with in its own section and suggested therapeutic approaches to each type are offered.  Also of considerable practical value in "Stressors and the Adjustment Disorders" is the exhaustive examination of vulnerability, ego strength and coping, the adjustment disorder syndrome, prevention and intervention, and a number of other issues central to a clinical understanding of the relative ability or inability to cope with change.  "Stressors and the Adjustment

Disorders" belongs in the reference libraries of psychiatrists, clinical, counseling, personality, industrial, developmental, health, and forensic psychologists, and virtually all mental health workers.

Notes/Comments: Section one: The nature of stress and the

nature of adjustment disorders The nature of stress: Problems of measurement  Andrew E. Skodol, Bruce P. Dohrenwend, Bruce G. Link and Patrick E. Shrout

Section two: Types of stressors

A: Stress arising from object loss Object loss due to death of parent or sibling  Richard A. Gardner Childhood stress due to parental divorce  Richard A. Gardner

B: Stress arising from illness Illness as a source of stress: Acute illness, chronic illness, and surgical procedures  Dane G. Prugh and Troy L. Thompson II Illness as stress: Accidents and toxic ingestions  Justin O. Schechter and Hoyle Leigh Pain as stress: Relationships to treatment  Marc Hertzman

C: Developmental sources of stress Birth-related reactions as sources of stress  Raphael S. Good, Regina P. Lederman, Howard J. Osofsky and David D. Youngs Developmental sources of stress: The first through the fifth year of life  Mollie M. Wallick Developmental sources of stress: Latency  Joseph D. Noshpitz Developmental sources of stress: Puberty  Bertram Slaff

D: Stress arising from natural disasters Flood, tornado, and hurricane  Mary Lystad Fire  Norman R. Bernstein

E: Stress arising from human violence Human-engendered bodily trauma: Rape and spouse beating  Carol C. Nadelson and Malkah T. Notman Stress experienced by robbery victims, hostages, kidnapping victims, and prisoners of war  Bruce L. Danto Child abuse: Its nature and treatment  Brandt F. Steele Assault by fellow citizens  Charles Keith Stress engendered by military action on military and civilian populations  Jon A. Shaw

F: Stress engendered by social trauma Prejudice and exclusion as social traumata  Paul L. Adams The psychological impact of being accused of, investigated for, or tried for malfeasance  Seymour L. Halleck Forced displacement to a new environment  Peter Steinglass and Ellen Gerrity Geographic change as a stressor: Developmental perspectives  Gordon K. Farley and Sidney Werkman Loss of an ideal  Michael H. Stone Economic trauma: A public health problem  Joseph H. Herzberg Section three: Vulnerabilities Pathogenesis of the adjustment disorders: Vulnerabilities due to temperamental factors  Stella Chess Stress, neuroendocrine patterns, and emotional response  James P. Henry

Section four: Protective factors: Ego strengths Family and extended family as ego supports  Lillian H. Robinson and Richard F. Dalton Ego strength and coping capacity: Friend and social group affiliation  William C. Sze Ego strength and coping capacity: Large group affiliation  William C. Sze and Barry Ivker Section five: The adjustment disorder syndrome Disturbances of conduct following stress  Charles Keith Psychological responses to stress: Work and academic inhibition and withdrawal  Jerry W. Johnson and Glenn Swogger Jr. Adjustment reactions: The psychotic syndrome  Sherman C. Feinstein, Randy Kettering and Martin Harrow Stress, adjustment disorders, and treatment interventions in mental retardation  Thomas G. Webster Section six: Prevention and intervention Toward preventive intervention in early childhood: Object loss  Gilbert W. Kliman The impact of life stress in infancy, childhood, and adolescence  Irving N. Berlin Stress prevention in adults Gerald J. McKenna and Ransom J. Arthur Treatment for stress-related disorders Joseph D. Noshpitz Individual psychotherapy in adjustment disorders  Carl P.

Adatto Author index Subject index Discusses stressors & the adjustment disorders, including sources of stress, coping strategies, therapeutic advice & an examination of coping abilities.

========================================

 

Title: Couples in exile: Political consciousness as an element in the psychosexual dynamics of a Latin American refugee couple.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Agger, Inger; Jensen, Soeren B.

Source/Citation: Sexual & Marital Therapy; Vol 4(1) 1989, United Kingdom: Carfax Publishing Limited; 1989, 101-108

Abstract/Review/Citation: Estimates show that a large number of Latin American refugees are divorced in exile. Presumably, the family system has difficulty adapting to the sudden change in its ecology. Both the social and personal creative identity are threatened in exile, and therapeutic help must therefore be offered at the individual and social levels. One important tool for the couple's survival is the consciousness of why they are in exile. In this case study of a Latin American couple in their twenties with psychosexual problems, their "private pain" is reframed in a political context. Both the

individual, and the joint, collective trauma they have suffered are seen in the context of their individual resources and their resources for interaction with others for a common goal: their collective resources. The wife needs to strengthen her collective resources, which for her means becoming involved in political and social activities of the exile group. ========================================

 

Title: Marital therapy--my style.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Wilks, Graham J.

Source/Citation: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy; Vol 10(2) Jun 1989, Australia: Australian & New Zealand Journal of Family Therapy in c/o; 1989, 105-109

Abstract/Review/Citation: Marital therapy is about changing the specific behavioral patterns of clients' intimate adult relationships. Clients come to therapy because they are stuck, in trauma, or looking for a way forward. They are provided in that context with a socially legitimated opportunity to tell their story. The primary task of the therapist is to discern the order and

themes operating in the stories and aid the continuance of acceptable experiences for further story telling. Two case studies of couples illustrate this approach.  ========================================

 

Title: The problem of loss and mourning:  Psychoanalytic perspectives.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Dietrich, David R.; Shabad, Peter C.

Source/Citation: Madison, CT, US: International Universities Press, Inc; 1989, (xxi, 499)

Abstract/Review/Citation: This immensely important book examines vital aspects of the profound and ubiquitous problem of loss and mourning. It brings together a carefully selected collection of original papers that shed new light on many facets of loss and mourning phenomena in terms of their place in

psychoanalytic theory, clinical practice, research, and daily life. In this volume, loss and mourning are treated with the depth and scope they deserve and are examined in relation to trauma, ego functions and development, defense organization, unconscious fantasy, psychopathology, clinical sequelae and developmental consequences of loss, and object relations. . . . The first

section addresses theoretical issues related to loss and mourning and Section II examines the clinical practice implications of such problems. Section III is devoted to the explication of developmental issues of object loss and mourning. Section IV examines research on the effects of parent loss. Section V confronts the massive psychic trauma and horrors of the Holocaust and inquiries into the limits of mourning such overwhelming losses. . . . This book will prove of great interest and value to psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic candidates, psychotherapists, researchers, and scholars and serious students of loss and mourning.

Notes/Comments:  Contributors Preface Acknowledgments

Introduction: The scope of the problem of loss and mourning [by] David R. Dietrich and Peter C. Shabad

Part I: Theoretical and applied psychoanalytic perspectives The mourning process, the creative process, and the creation 

George H. Pollock Trauma, loss, restoration, and creativity  William G. Niederland Mourning a lost childhood: The problem of Peter Pan  Nancy Mann Kulish Vicissitudes of psychic loss of a physically present parent  Peter C. Shabad

Part II: Developmental perspectives Some effects of the one-parent family on personality development  Erna Furman and Robert A. Furman The place of object loss in normal development  Fred Pine The significance of loss and mourning in the older adult: Clinical and research findings  Jerome Grunes and Wendy Wasson

Part III: Clinical contributions Personality change through life

experience. III: Two creative types of response to object loss  Milton Viederman The "parent loss" of empathic failures and the model symbolic restitution of eating disorders  David W. Krueger Parental loss through divorce: Dimensions of the loss experience  Rebecca Lohr and Morton Chethik Complicated mourning over a body defect: The making of a "living linking object"  Robert Zuckerman and Vamik Volkan

Part IV: Empirical studies on loss and their implications: Research perspectives Early childhood parent death, psychic trauma and organization, and object relations  David R. Dietrich Father loss, cognitive and personality functioning  Henry B. Biller and Margery Salter

Part V: Loss, mourning, and the Holocaust Coping with losses and survival  Judith S. Kestenberg The inability to mourn--today  Margarete Mitscherlich-Nielsen Mourning in survivors and children of survivors of the Nazi Holocaust: The role of group and community modalities  Yael Danieli

Epilogue: Reflections on loss, mourning, and the unconscious process of regeneration [by] Peter C. Shabad and David R. Dietrich Author index Subject index

========================================

 

Title: Reflections of early childhood family experiences in the educational situation.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Littner, Ner

Source/Citation: Learning and education:  Psychoanalytic perspectives., Madison, CT, US: International Universities Press, Inc; 1989, (xix, 1016), 825-849 Emotions and behavior monographs, No. 6.

Source editor(s): Field, Kay (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: differentiates between "realistic" and unrealistic (i.e., emotional feelings toward and reactions to children experienced by teachers) and proceeds to explain how understanding the mental mechanisms involved in these emotional transactions applies to the tasks of learning and teaching and the purpose of education / focuses, in particular, on "those factors that influence a child's ability to form a positive relationship (e.g., learning alliance) with the teacher, and through this relationship, to learn how to learn / acknowledging the differences in the mother-child and teacher-student relationships, Littner maintains that there

are important similarities in what the child needs from both problems that interfere with the child's ability to form a positive relationship / traumatic family experiences / the student who is a child of divorce / factors determining a student's vulnerability to separation and change / how separation reactions show themselves in school / in the area of learning / in the area of behavior / in physical symptoms  ========================================

 

Title: Voice therapy:  A psychotherapeutic approach to self-destructive behavior.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Firestone, Robert W.

Source/Citation: New York, NY, US: Human Sciences Press, Inc; 1988, (291) Description/Edition Info.: Authored Book; 120

Abstract/Review/Citation: The concept of the "Voice," an internal system of hostile thoughts and attitudes antithetical to the self, has been gaining wide recognition in recent years among psychologists and psychiatrists. This thought-evoking work offers a comprehensive set of theoretical constructs explaining the dynamics of this destructive thought process present in every individual. The procedures of Voice Therapy, as

developed by Dr. Firestone, have been designed to elicit and identify the contents of these negative thought patterns. The process of identifying the "Voice" and its associated feelings of self-hatred and rage toward self, combined with corrective suggestions for behavioral change, significantly expand the patient's boundaries and bring about a more positive sense of self.

Notes/Comments:  (Abbreviated) Dedication Acknowledgments Foreword [by] Joseph Richman Introduction Part I: The voice The concept of the voice Dimensions of the voice Events that precipitate self-attacks Vanity as compensation for the negative self-image Manifestations of the voice The voice process and value systems Historical development of voice therapy Initial

investigations of the voice process Dramatization of the voice Defensive functions of the voice Two points of view Dynamics of the voice Introjection, negative identification, and the voice: A developmental perspective Imitation The relationship between the voice process, melancholia, and suicide Origins of the voice The voice and child abuse, a cyclical process Repression and the

introjection of parental attitudes The universality of childhood trauma Manifestations of child abuse perpetuated by the voice Circumstances that provoke parental rage The fantasy bond and "the divided self" Pseudo-independence and the process of introjection The addictive nature of the fantasy bond Repressed trauma Recapitulation of the past The basic split in schizophrenia Three modes of experience: The parent, the child, and the

adult

Part II: Self-destructive manifestations of the voice The dual nature of guilt reactions Neurotic and existential guilt Guilt and separation Self-hatred and guilt The voice and neurotic guilt The voice and existential guilt Manifestations of guilt in schizophrenia Guilt and death anxiety Micro-suicide and suicidal threats of everyday life The dynamics of micro-suicide Micro-suicides of everyday life Micro-suicidal behavior following positive recognition: A case report The voice in depression and suicide The problem of the rising incidence of suicide The voice in depression Other cognitive approaches to suicidal ideation Bipolar causality of suicidal ideation and behavior Operating levels Case history Other case reports Theoretical considerations Part III: Therapeutic approaches Voice therapy procedures The analytic and abreactive methods of voice therapy The three steps in voice therapy Corrective suggestions Clinical findings Voice therapy in marital and family therapy Voice therapy evaluation Evaluation of procedures Comparison with cognitive-behavioral therapies The dilemma of psychotherapy Definitions of psychotherapeutic "cure": Some perspectives Paradox of feeling Guilt and fear reactions arising from breaking bonds Problems in personal relationships Increased death anxiety References Index ========================================

 

Title: Abuse and victimization across the life span.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Straus, Martha B.

Source/Citation: Baltimore, MD, US: The Johns Hopkins University Press; 1988, (x, 270) The Johns Hopkins series in contemporary medicine and public health.

Abstract/Review/Citation: "Abuse and Victimization across the Life Span" addresses the problem of family violence from a developmental perspective.  Rather than limiting its focus to a specific stage of development, the book encourages professionals and students to consider the effects of violence on victims at all points in the life span from infancy to late adulthood. With each period, chapters treat normal development, the effects of abuse on development, and strategies for change.  The contributors also explore special topics such as the criminalization of family violence, abuse of the disabled, race and ethnicity in family violence, and the empowerment of battered women.  Combining theoretical, empirical, and practical concerns, "Abuse and Victimization across the Life Span" is of importance to both researchers and practitioners.

Notes/Comments:  Acknowledgments List of contributors Introduction: Family violence across the life span [by] Martha B.

Straus

One  Infancy The mother-infant tie: Of bonding and abuse  Beverly Birns The maltreatment of infants  Howard Dubowitz and Harwood Egan

Two  Childhood and adolescence The interpersonal legacy of physical abuse of children  Stephen R. Shirk Sexual abuse in the lives of children  Frances Sink Abused adolescents  Martha B. Straus

Three  Adulthood How normal is normal development?  Some connections between adult development and the roots of abuse and victimization  Alexandra G. Kaplan Rape in marriage  David Finkelhor and Kersti Yllo Surviving: Women's strength through connection  Carolyn F. Swift Trauma in men: Effects on family life  Bessel V. van der Kolk Elder abuse  Terry Fulmer

Four  Special topics Physical victimization across the life span: Recognition, ethnicity, and deterrence  Robert L. Hampton Special groups at risk of abuse: The disabled  Nora E. Groce A framework for understanding and empowering battered women  Susan Schechter with Lisa T. Gary The treatment and criminal prosecution of family violence  Richard Bourne Index ========================================

 

Title: Family interventions throughout chronic illness and disability.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Power, Paul W.; Dell Orto, Arthur E.; Gibbons, Martha Blechar

Source/Citation: New York, NY, US: Springer Publishing Co, Inc; 1988, (xvi, 320) Springer series on rehabilitation, Vol. 7.

Abstract/Review/Citation: This book shows how appropriate interventions can put an illness or disability into perspective, and how an intervention can create an option for the family to live its life as fully as possible. It also provides different helping approaches for varied family situations. It offers the reader knowledge about selected disabilities and disease enitities, and how they affect family dynamics and adjustment concerns. Further, the book identifies the needs of family members in selected, disability, and disease-related situations and explains assessment approaches that focus both on family adjustment goals and the utilization of the family for support and/or rehabilitation purposes. Importantly, this book provides insights for helping a family as it comes to terms with the reality of a chronic illness and explains what helping skills could be most effective for coping with the disability or illness trauma.  The intended audience for this book includes health, allied health, and other helping professionals whose work responsibilities will bring them into contact with families as they pursue their interventions with the identified patient. It is also written for those still in training in a health or allied-health-professional field--social workers, psychologists, clergy, nurses, rehabilitation counselors, occupational therapists, and physical therapists.

Notes/Comments:  Preface Acknowledgments Contributors Part I: Family assessment and intervention issues An assessment

approach to family intervention  Paul W. Power An intervention model for families of the disabled  Paul W. Power Personal statement: My life with a disability--continued opportunities  Paul Egan Study questions and suggested activities

Part II:  Child and family issues Personal statement: The challenge of cerebral palsy: Familial adaptation and change  Linda Pelletier Infant life on a monitor: Family implications  Susan R. Leibold Coping with childhood cancer: A family perspective  Martha Blechar Gibbons Children of hope: Learning to live with HIV infection  Dorothy Ward-Wimmer Deafness and family impact  Marita Danek Personal statement: Mechanisms for coping with the disability of a child--a mother's perspective  Janet Miller Study questions and suggested activities

Part III: Emerging family issues during adolescence and adulthood Personal statement: Experiencing sexuality as an adolescent with rheumatoid arthritis  Robert J. Neumann Challenged adolescents with spina bifida  Allen F. Johnson Insights and intervention into the sexual needs of the disabled adolescent  Sue Bregman and Elaine E. Castles The impact of a

handicapped child on adolescent siblings: Implications for professional intervention  Carol Keydel Enabling the family in supporting transition from school to work  Edna Mora Szymanski, David B. Hershenson and Paul W. Power Family involvement in mental health interventions for women with physical disabilities  Kay Harris Kriesgman and Beverly Celotta Personal statement:

Living in spite of multiple sclerosis  Tosca Appel Study questions and suggested activities

Part IV: Selected challenges of the later years Respite care: A vehicle for hope, the buffer against desperation  Arthur E. Dell Orto Alzheimer's disease: Impact on families and caregivers  Rennie Rogers Golec and Ann D. Lassalle Personal statement: Surviving ALS--a daughter's perspective  Judy Teplow Study questions and suggested activities Index ========================================

 

Title: Understanding identity disruption and intimacy: One aspect of post-traumatic stress.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Young, Mitchell B.

Source/Citation: Contemporary Family Therapy: An International Journal; Vol 10(1) Spr 1988, US: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers; 1988, 30-43

Abstract/Review/Citation: Details the change taking place in the mental processes of trauma victims and the subsequent disruption of identity and intimacy. It is contended that for those who experience a traumatic incident, concepts of self and world views may be broken. The psychic disruption of the symbolic processes attendant to traumatic events may interfere with recovery.  Lacking a strong sense of self and feeling blameful for what they have experienced, trauma victims may become unable to sustain intimate relationships and romantic dyads. At the same time, symbolic processes become impaired and identity is marked by separation, disintegration, and stasis.

Healing occurs when all aspects of the traumatic incident, cognitive and emotional, are integrated into self-concepts.  ========================================

 

Title: Parallels and pitfalls: The aftermath of legal reform for sexual assault, marital rape, and domestic violence victims.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Caringella-MacDonald, Susan

Source/Citation: Journal of Interpersonal Violence; Vol 3(2) Jun 1988, US: Sage Publications Inc; 1988, 174-189

Abstract/Review/Citation: Reports that over the past 10 yrs, virtually all states have reformulated legal codes in order to redress problems in the violent victimization of women. One positive development is the legal recognition of the Rape Trauma syndrome and the Battered Woman syndrome.  Attempts to rectify problems by reformulating criminal definitions have been

problematic, and new laws continue to be attacked from a variety of viewpoints. A major problem is that of discretionary enforcement of reforms that causes gains, protections, and prosecution that fall far below reform goals. It is contended that reform can be viewed as targeting symptoms rather than underlying causes and that permanent change must address the economic, political, and social inequalities in the social structure.  ========================================

 

Title: Adolescents and their aging parents.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Mandelbaum, Arthur

Source/Citation: Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic; Vol 52(3) May 1988, US: Menninger Foundation; 1988, 246-258

Abstract/Review/Citation: Examines the struggles and conflicts of an adolescent son and his father, using data from a family therapy case report. The parents in the case felt old and isolated as their children sought their own identity and individuation. Unresolved conflicts and trauma from the parents'

adolescent experiences had been projected onto a particular child who wanted more freedom and responsibility. The clash between the father and the son was ameliorated by using family strengths and by dealing with key analogues and metaphors offered by family members themselves. The resolution of the father's repressed mourning and grief permitted him, his wife, and the son to modify the structure of their relationships and tolerate change. ========================================

 

Title: Treating the elderly with psychotherapy: The scope for change in later life.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Sadavoy, Joel; Leszcz, Molyn

Source/Citation: Madison, CT, US: International Universities Press, Inc; 1987, (xxiv, 366)

Abstract/Review/Citation: The book focuses on a spectrum of disorders and difficulties in both ambulatory, relatively intact individuals, and institutionalized and more severely impaired patients.  A special emphasis has been placed on the understanding and management of the problems of the interdisciplinary team in dealing with the difficult elderly person who evokes difficult transference-countertransference reactions within certain milieus.  General psychiatrists dealing with the elderly and those who use psychotherapeutic approaches, psychogeriatric consultants, as well as social workers, nurses, psychologists, and other members of the health care team may

find the book of value.  The book is divided into three main sections.  The first deals with general psychodynamic issues, providing an overview of theoretical, psychodynamic, and psychotherapeutic principles in the treatment of the aged patient.

Part II Deals more specifically with four aspects of psychopathology which are especially relevant to the elderly: paranoid disorders, the effect of massive psychic trauma, the exaggerated helplessness syndrome, and character pathology. The final section of the book is devoted to specific approaches to treatment.  We hope this volume achieves its purpose of aiding those who are seriously engaged in treating the elderly,

by demonstrating psychodynamic and psychotherapeutic theories and techniques which can be practically applied on a clinical level.

Notes/Comments:  Foreword [by] Irvin D. Yalom Preface Acknowledgments Contributors Part I  General psychodynamic perspectives The mourning-liberation process: Ideas on the inner life of the older adult  George H. Pollock The aged in psychotherapy: Psychodynamic contributions to the treatment process  Jerome M. Grunes Reflections on psychotherapy with the elderly  Martin A. Berezin

Part II  Manifestations of psychopathology Psychodynamics of paranoid phenomena in the aged  Adrian Verwoerdt The impact

of massive psychic trauma and the capacity to grieve effectively: Later life sequelae  Henry Krystal Exaggerated helplessness syndrome  Lawrence Breslau Character disorders in the elderly: An overview  Joel Sadavoy

Part III Specific psychotherapeutic modalities Geriatric psychotherapy: Beyond crisis management  Ralph J. Kahana Brief psychotherapy with the elderly: A study of process and outcome  Lawrence W. Lazarus and Lesley Groves The whole grandfather: An intergenerational approach to family therapy  Etta Ginsberg McEwan Group psychotherapy with the elderly  Molyn Leszcz Name index Subject index ========================================

 

Title: On becoming blind--the loss and the change in the family: A case study.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Katz, Ellie H.

Source/Citation: Family Systems Medicine; Vol 5(1) Spr 1987, US: Families Systems & Health Inc; 1987, 79-96

Abstract/Review/Citation: Presents the case of the family of a 15-yr-old boy who had been blinded in an accident. The present author describes the reactions of each family member in terms of themes such as overprotectiveness, nonverbal communication, and life cycle considerations. By working with the family as a whole and by acknowledging their collective trauma, the therapist was able to ameliorate the rapid deterioration of healthy functioning. Via the interventions, the family was able to move toward healthy functioning. ========================================

 

Title: Stress, social support, and women.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Hobfoll, Stevan E.

Source/Citation: Washington, DC, US: Hemisphere Publishing Corp; 1986, (xviii, 272) The series in clinical and community psychology.

Abstract/Review/Citation: This book is concerned with the stressors women undergo from adolescence to old age and the resources, especially interpersonal resources, women use to cope with these stressors. There follows a series of chapters that address the use of social support as a resource for coping with stressul life events that confront women in a variety of contexts during their life span.  A central goal of this volume, which is addressed in almost every chapter and is the central topic of the final chapter, is to draw implications from research on social support for clinical and other interventions as they concern women. A second goal, which is related to the first, is to encourage new research in the area of social support, and to

suggest methodological and theoretical directions this research might take.  Following an ecological life-span approach developed in the introductory chapter, this volume proceeds along the life course of women, addressing the problems women normally confront or are threatened with in each life stage.  The volume is recommended for upper-level graduate courses and for use by mental health professionals. It should be particularly valuable for courses in women's studies, community psychology, social psychology, social work, and life-span development that emphasize a research orientation.

Notes/Comments:   Contributors Preface Introduction The ecology of stress and social support among women  Stevan E. Hobfoll

I. Developmental issues in the adjustment of women The

challenge of adolescent friendship: A study of Lisa and her friends  Barton J. Hirsch and Robin J. Renders Adjustment of women on campus: Effects of stressful life events, social support, and personal competencies  Ellen Ostrow, Stephen C. Paul, Veronica J. Dark and Jay A. Behrman Social network

interviews as sources of etic and emic data: A study of young married women  Catherine H. Stein and Julian Rappaport

II. Career, marriage, and family stressors Sex differences in depression: The role of spouse support  Beth E. Vanfossen Three Mile Island: Social support and affective disorders among

mothers  Zahava Solomon Marital and employment role-strain, social support, and depression among adult women  Carol S. Aneshensel Stress, coping, and the social milieu of divorced women  Brian L. Wilcox

III. Violence toward women The victim of rape and the role of life change, coping, and social support during the rape trauma syndrome  Libby O. Ruch and Joseph J. Leon Coping and social support among battered women: An ecological perspective  Roger E. Mitchell and Christine A. Hodson IV. Women's health The stress of childbearing: Nurse-midwives as a source of social support  Cynthia S. Rand A comparison of the impact of breast cancer and bereavement: Personality, social support, and adaptation  Mary L. S. Vachon V. Bereavement and old age Peer

support for widows: Personal and structural characteristics related to its provision  Elizabeth A. Bankoff Elderly women's health and psychological adjustment: Life stressors and social support  Margaret W. Linn Social support: Research, theory, and applications from research on women  Stevan E. Hobfoll Author index Subject index discusses stressors that women encounter

throughout stages of the lifespan, & the resources, especially interpersonal resources, women use in coping with these stressors; examines the use of social support as a resource for coping with stressful life events ========================================

 

Title: Court-ordered mediation in family disputes: The New York proposal.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Silberman, Linda; Schepard, Andrew

Source/Citation: Review of Law & Social Change; Vol 14(3) 1986, US: New York University; 1986, 741-756

Abstract/Review/Citation: Discusses the desirability of the proposed New York child custody bill, which requires court-ordered mediation in custody disputes under certain circumstances. Evidence exists that mediation helps parents develop custody arrangements for their children with less hostility and trauma than do traditional negotiation and litigation. It is concluded that the proposed legislation may represent a valuable alternative to the present system of dispute resolution. (0 ref)

========================================

 

Title: Prenatal diagnosis of fetal disorders: II. Issues and implications.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Beeson, Diane; Douglas, Rita; Lunsford, Terry F.

Source/Citation: Birth: Issues in Perinatal Care & Education; Vol 10(4) Win 1983, US: Birth & The Family Journal; 1983, 233-241

Abstract/Review/Citation: Discusses psychological implications, ethical and legal controversies, and social policy issues related to the prenatal diagnosis of mental or physical impairments. Research evidence suggests that those who choose abortion because of the risk of genetic disease may suffer serious emotional trauma and may have a greater need for psychotherapy than those who abort for socioeconomic or psychological reasons. The testing procedure itself may become the focus of considerable stress, and the wait for results may lead to a suspension of commitment to the pregnancy. Prenatal

diagnosis may also affect the mother's image of and attachment to her fetus. Other issues discussed include the efficacy and safety of prenatal diagnostic techniques, the value of broadening screening programs, and the risk of diverting resources from more basic care. (59 ref)  ========================================

 

Title: Quelques aspects psychologiques de la circoncision au Maghreb./ Some psychological aspects of circumcision among the North Africans.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Benchekroun, Mohamed F.

Source/Citation: Psychologie Medicale; Vol 14(8) Jun 1982, France: Societe de Presse Medicale; 1982, 1227-1231

Abstract/Review/Citation: Discusses the ritual of circumcision of young males from historical, religious, and cultural perspectives. Among Jews, a male child is circumcised on his 8th day of life. The act is symbolic of Abraham's covenant with the Almighty, and a Jewish male has no memory of his life before

circumcision. This is in sharp contrast to the North African Muslim male, who is not circumcised before the age of 13 yrs. Circumcision is a rite of passage in the North African community, symbolizing the passage of the boy into manhood. Previously the male child had life in the harem, the world of his mother, sisters, aunts, and younger siblings. The father is a remote somewhat

terrifying figure to the inhabitants of the harem. Circumcision marks the transition of the male child from the mother's to the father's world. The act of circumcision is not symbolic castration but a reminder of submission to the will of a larger being: the rule of Allah, Mohammed, the community, the family, and the father. The change in social status that accompanies circumcision, along with the trauma associated with the sexual feelings of adolescents, may contribute to psychological confusion and mental distress. (English abstract) (19 ref)  ========================================

 

Title: Parental intervention: A growing alliance.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Brusiloff, Phyllis; Schulman, Rena

Source/Citation: Family & Child Mental Health Journal; Vol 7(1) Spr-Sum 1981, US: Jewish Board of Family & Children Services; 1981, 30-37

Abstract/Review/Citation: Describes the establishment of a working alliance between a teacher-therapist and the parents (Black, White, Puerto Rican, and others) of 20 disturbed children in a daycare center in the hope of modifying the parent-child relationship. Parents were unable to utilize traditional social service agencies. It was found that a change of attitude in the child evoked a change of attitude and behavior in the parent. Children also mastered trauma, and had more pleasure in social relationships with peer and stranger-adults. It is concluded that it is possible to reach most parents, enabling them to permit their children to be helped. ========================================

 

Title: Family therapy and the historical moment.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Friesen, Victor I.

Source/Citation: Family Therapy; Vol 8(3) 1981, US: Libra Publishers Inc; 1981, 211-221

Abstract/Review/Citation: Discusses the evolution of family therapy in relation to sociocultural developments and the emergence of new tendencies in psychological theory. Only after the emotional trauma of the War years did the individualized perspective inherent in psychoanalysis give way to a more

interactional view. The earlier paradigm of developmental and behavioral determination had evolved, and family and behavioral processes were combined with the product of this paradigmatic shift--systems theory--to develop a change-therapy for nonpsychotic families. The focus of this change in family therapy is the redefinition of interactive patterns, rather than a change in the individual alone. (30 ref) ========================================

 

Title: Analyses des facteurs declencheurs sur en echatillon de patients hospitalises pour depression endogene./ A study of releasing factors in a sampling of patients hospitalized for endogenous depression.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Ayuso Gutierrez, J. L.; Fuentenebro de Diego, F.; Mendez Barroso, R.; Mateo Martin, I.

Source/Citation: Annales Medico-Psychologiques; Vol 139(7) Jul 1981, Argentina: Masson Services; 1981, 759-769

Abstract/Review/Citation: To assess the relationship between depression and a number of social and somatic factors, the authors analyzed 106 female and 37 male 15-75 yr old patients hospitalized for endogenous depression. 41.2% of the Ss showed internal causes for depression such as infectious diseases,

surgery, trauma, drastic weight reduction, or gynecological problems. External causes, such as death in the family, change of residence, family illness and difficulties, and economic and professional problems, affected 52.4% of the Ss. Sex, age, and social class showed little correlation with the causes of depression, but the latter correlated highly with the initial phase of the illness and decreased rapidly in later phases. Results suggest the need to tailor treatment diachronically and in an evolutionary manner. (20 ref) ========================================

 

Title: Crisis treatment of a preadolescent who accidentally killed his twin.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Petti, Theodore A.; Wells, Karen C.

Source/Citation: American Journal of Psychotherapy; Vol 34(3) Jul 1980, US: Assn for the Advancement of Psychotherapy; 1980, 434-443

Abstract/Review/Citation: Describes the multimodality treatment of a preadolescent who killed his twin brother. A brief review of the literature concerning accidental homicide and a discussion of the rationale for each component employed in a multifaceted approach to treating the pathology resulting from such a tragic event are provided. Attention is drawn to the

interaction of dynamically oriented psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, family work, conflict resolution and problem solving skills, systematic desensitization, and biofeedback as they were systematically employed in a depressed boy with psychoticlike features. Methods of assessing change and making clinical decisions are depicted. The effectiveness of this approach is borne out by follow-up 14 mo later. (29 ref)  ========================================

 

Title: "Demenager": Reactions psychopathologiques aux changements d'habitation./ "Moving": Psychopathological reactions to a change of house.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Millet, L.; Pon, J.; Guibaud, J.-M.;

Auriol, G.

Source/Citation: Annales Medico-Psychologiques; Vol 138(2) Feb 1980, Argentina: Masson Services; 1980, 212-221

Abstract/Review/Citation: Analyzes the symptomatic, nosographic, and etiological characteristics of 21 female and 4 male Ss (aged 15-80 yrs) treated for psychopathological disorders subsequent to moving. For each S, the move coincided with a major crisis in life (e.g., midlife crisis), and females

reacted more severely than males. 14 Ss exhibited the symptoms of classic depression; in some cases, anorexia, hypochondria, and psychosomatic symptoms were observed. In each case, the upset of the habitual environment was the concrete expression of an underlying emotional loss, e.g. separation from family, birthplace, neighbors, or professional life (i.e., retirement). The

move was voluntary for 16 Ss; for the others, the involuntary nature of the move aggravated the condition. For 10 Ss, a return to the previous environment was the best therapy; of the remaining 15 Ss, only 4 made a complete adjustment. The symbolic value of the home as a place of refuge and security is emphasized. As a form of separation, a move opens the door to new and positive experiences, but it may also result in disillusionment and a sense of loss. (9 ref) ========================================

 

Title: Social, legal, and therapeutic changes that should lessen the traumatic effects of divorce on children.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Gardner, Richard A.

Source/Citation: Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis; Vol 6(2) Apr 1978, US: Guilford Publications; 1978, 231-247

Abstract/Review/Citation: Easing the plight of the divorcing and the divorced requires the efforts of a broad range of professional disciplines. The author presents certain specific changes which, if implemented, could prevent and/or lessen some of the psychological traumas attendant on divorce. Misguided and ill-conceived marriages might be prevented by greater emphasis on family living classes in high school, raising the legal minimum age for marriage, increasing the waiting period between obtaining a marriage license and getting married, and encouraging couples to seek marriage-preparatory educational and counseling programs. Predivorce counseling, provided by a neutral therapist, should be made increasingly available. Divorce proceedings and child custody cases should no longer follow an adversary model, but one of arbitration and mediation. Joint custody provides a reasonable approximation to the natural marital situation. Legal measures should be instituted to deal with the "brainwashing" parent and the "kidnapping" parent.

Conjoint counseling helps to resolve the ambivalent feelings after divorce. Monogamous marriage, despite its shortcomings, continues to be the best possible arrangement for the psychological health of children and for the stability of society. ========================================

 

Title: A mothers' center: Research, service, and advocacy.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Turrini, Patsy

Source/Citation: Social Work; Vol 22(6) Nov 1977, US: National Assn of Social Workers; 1977, 478-483

Abstract/Review/Citation: Administered a 260-item questionnaire to 5 discussion groups comprising a total of 36 women who had delivered a child in the last 2-4 yrs. The questionnaire covered the following time periods: the 3 trimesters of pregnancy, labor, delivery, the hospital stay, the return home, and initial adjustment. Group facilitators asked the predetermined questions, noted the absence of responses, encouraged each member to answer. New subject matter was accepted if it pertained to the period being discussed. Findings

are based on a review of audiotapes, videotapes, and written records of the group facilitators. As an outgrowth of the group members' desire for change, a mothers' center was formed to provide a meeting place for peer and professional exchange with the aim of preventing trauma to the mother. Peer counseling study groups, and discussion groups are available. It is suggested that mental health professionals should be willing to help women prepare for childbirth and to help them rework the trauma of delivery. ========================================

 

Title: The problem of psychogenic mutism in childhood and adolescence.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Haenel, T.; Werder, H.

Source/Citation: Schweizer Archiv fuer Neurologie, Neurochirurgie und Psychiatrie; Vol 121(2) 1977, Germany: Verlag Baebler; 1977, 261-276

Abstract/Review/Citation: Defines and differentiates various types of mutism. Psychogenic mutism can be elective or total. Both psychic trauma and conflict situations within the family can be responsible for initiating the mutism. An excessively strong mother attachment is often observed. According to A. Weber

(1950), one can distinguish a simple reactive mutism from the neurotic form. Some mute children have a latent or manifest depression. Mutism is a relatively rare disturbance, which probably occurs with equal frequency in both sexes. The typical age for the elective mutism is early childhood or when school is started. Some authors report a particularly high incidence of brain damage among mute patients. In the German literature, the number of children with mutism who possess below-average intelligence is particularly high. In the American literature, which is generally more recent, such children are much less frequently represented. The therapy consists of a change of milieu or intensive outpatient psychotherapy in which the parents or the family should be included. The prognosis is good. Several cases of total mutism from the postwar literature and a case observed by the authors are described. (45 ref) ========================================

 

Title: Children of disaster: Clinical observations at Buffalo Creek.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Newman, C. Janet

Source/Citation: Annual Progress in Child Psychiatry & Child Development, US: Brunner/Mazel Inc; 1977, 149-161

Abstract/Review/Citation: Reports that most of the 224 children who were survivor-plaintiffs of the Buffalo Creek disaster were emotionally impaired by their experiences. The major factors contributing to this impairment were developmental level at the time of the flood, perceptions of family reactions, and direct exposure to the disaster. The present author focuses on 11 children under 12, describing their responses to fantasy-eliciting techniques and their observed behavior after the flood compared with developmental norms for their age and reports of their previous behavior. Ss share a modified sense of reality, increased vulnerability to future stresses, altered senses of the

power of the self, and early awareness of fragmentation and death. These factors could lead to "after-trauma" in later life if they cannot make the necessary adaptations and/or do not receive special help to deal with the traumas. (4 ref) ========================================

 

Title: Family and character change at Buffalo Creek.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Titchener, James L.; Kapp, Frederic T.

Source/Citation: American Journal of Psychiatry; Vol 133(3) Mar 1976, US: American Psychiatric Assn; 1976, 295-299

Abstract/Review/Citation: Psychiatric evaluation teams used observations of family interaction and psychoanalytically oriented individual interviews to study the psychological aftereffects of the 1972 Buffalo Creek disaster, a tidal wave of sludge and black water released by the collapse of a slag waste

dam. Traumatic neurotic reactions were found in 80% of the 625 survivors interviewed. Underlying the clinical picture were unresolved grief, survivor shame, and feelings of impotent rage and hopelessness. These clinical findings had persisted for the 2 yrs since the flood, and a definite symptom complex labeled the "Buffalo Creek syndrome" was pervasive. The methods used

by the survivors to cope with the overwhelming impact of the disaster--1st-order defenses, undoing, psychological conservatism, and dehumanization--actually preserved their symptoms and caused disabling character changes. ========================================

 

Title: "Loss of pleasure" as a sequal to head traumas.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Martimor, E.

Source/Citation: Annales Medico-Psychologiques; Vol 1(2) Feb 1976, Argentina: Masson Services; 1976, 219-223

Abstract/Review/Citation: Discusses changes in personality or in prevailing mood that may result from head injury. The neuropsychiatric expert charged with evaluating the consequences of a cranial trauma will often center attention on the classical "post-commotional" subjective syndrome of disturbed intellectual function: memory disorders, easy fatiguability, difficulty in concentrating, or slowness in ideation. Less generally recognized, although they have been described in detail, are those forms of altered affect or of character that may often be important consequences of head injury. One characteristic disturbance has been singled out and named the "loss of pleasure" syndrome, which is typified by a significant and persistent absence of what had formerly been the satisfactions of daily life. The loss may occur in quite varied domains of activity (e.g., social and family life, participation in sports or other hobbies, and cultural engagements). A case history illustrates this important but frequently neglected sequel to cranial trauma, as well as the role that it may play in determining awards of indemnity for accident victims.  ========================================

 

Title: The posttraumatic personality.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Girard, V.; Schadelle, J. M.

Source/Citation: Revue de Medecine Psychosomatique et de Psychologie Medicale; Vol 17(2) 1975, France: Privat, Editeur; 1975, 135-156

Abstract/Review/Citation: Describes the changes in personality and body image found to occur after cranio-cerebral war wounds in young adults. Short-term aftereffects include coma and anxiety about being examined or submitted to

psychological tests of intellectual or psychomotor functioning. Guidelines for the physicians treating patients in this stage are given. The patient gradually becomes aware of the instrumental deficits caused by the injury. He develops 3 images of his body: the intact body of the past, the incapacitated present body, and the fully functioning body he fantasizes will be his in the

future. Gradually he assimilates the experience of the trauma and learns to live in the world in a new, existential way. The importance of studying the individual's pretraumatic personality and of helping the patient's family accept his, posttrauma identity is stressed. Pre- and posttraumatic personalities of 2 young adult brain-damaged soldiers are described.  ========================================

 

Title: Transsexualism and transvestism.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Stoller, Robert J.

Source/Citation: Psychiatric Annals; Vol. 1(4) Dec 1971, US: SLACK Incorporated; 1971, 60-72

Abstract/Review/Citation: Argues that while cross-dressing is characteristic of both transsexualism and transvestism, the 2 disorders are distinct, separate conditions with different clinical and etiological characteristics. The development of a typical transsexual male and female, the family dynamics, psychotherapy, and the implications of the sex-change procedures are described and discussed. Transvestism is distinguished from transsexuality in its development, characteristics, and etiology. The common finding of a cross-dressing trauma in the childhood of the transvestites is discussed. Biological etiology of the 2 disorders is considered. Research and theoretical problems in the study of transsexualism and transvestism are discussed. Some warnings about the sex-change operations are added. (21 ref.) ========================================

 

Title: Alcoholism and the "empty nest."

Author(s)/Editor(s): Curlee, Joan

Source/Citation: Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic; 33(3) 1969, US: Menninger Foundation; 1969, 165-171

Abstract/Review/Citation: Of 100 women treated in an alcoholism treatment center, most of whom were middle or upper middle class, 30 found some specific factor with which they could associate the onset of alcoholism. "For 21 of the women, however, the onset of excessive drinking appeared to be related

to problems associated with the middle-age identity crisis which is sometimes referred to as the 'empty nest syndrome.' For each of these women, the 'trauma' which triggered their alcoholism was in some way related to a change in, or a challenge to, their roles as wives or mothers . . . . an 'identity crisis' is not something which one experiences in adolescence and then has

solved for all time. It can occur at many periods of life and, for women, may frequently be associated with the menopause, the loss of their husbands, or their children's leaving home."  ========================================

 

Title: Perversions consecutives a une diphtherie grave./ Perversions following a severe attack of diphtheria.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Demay, G.; Sizaret, A.

Source/Citation: Annales Medico-Psychologiques; 88 1930, Argentina: Masson Services; 1930, 53-57

Abstract/Review/Citation: Following a severe attack of diphtheria in a 13-year-old girl resulting in temporary paralysis of both legs, growth ceased and a personality change occurred. She was expelled from boarding school and returned home. She began stealing from her parents' grocery and other stores. Physical maturity ceased; she became very emaciated. At meals she refused most food and drinks, but stole liquor and vinegar to drink between meals. Finally she was arrested for stealing in Paris and committed to the infirmary. In confinement she appeared docile, but during the night stole eatables from the

other patients. Although the family history was bad and the patient no doubt had a predisposition for instability, especially at puberty, the author contends that the diphtheria was not merely an accidental factor. ========================================

 

Title: The psychogenic factors in the sequelae of cerebral trauma. Report of two cases.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Pearson, H. J.

Source/Citation: Journal of Nervous & Mental Disease; 67 1928, US: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 1928, 449-456

Abstract/Review/Citation: Certain symptoms such as headache, dizziness, restlessness, fatigability, forgetfulness, slowness in thought and changes in personality often develop after head injuries. Undoubtedly organic changes in the nervous system are responsible for some of the post-traumatic symptoms, but this is not always true. Two cases are given to show the necessity of a thorough psychiatric study in order to determine the pathogenesis of the symptoms. In one case the trauma was only a concurrent precipitating factor in the change in personality and in the other case the trauma produced some

degree of security for the patient in his family circle and the need of his overt behavior ceased. In neither case could nay organic damage to the central nervous system be held responsible for the symptom complex. Bibliography.

Title: Family intervention in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorders.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Saldanha, D.

Source/Citation: Journal of Projective Psychology & Mental Health; Vol 9(1) Jan 2002, India: Somatic Inkblot Society; 2002, 57-61

Abstract/Review/Citation: Details the cases of 6 military personnel (aged 17-38 yrs) who, after sustaining various traumas, met criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A treatment protocol was used that incorporated family members whenever possible. Five families actively cooperated in a trauma-based cognitive framework and insight-oriented psychotherapy to effect on attitudinal change. Five out of the 6 PTSD cases showed significant improvement with the intervention of family members. The 6th case illustrates how incorporating a family member in treatment could have helped prevent chronicity of PTSD. Finally, the significance of the role of families in the care of the mentally ill is discussed.  ========================================

 

Title: An art therapy group for children traumatized by parental violence and separation.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Kozlowska, Kasia; Hanney, Lesley

Source/Citation: Clinical Child Psychology & Psychiatry; Vol 6(1) Jan 2001, England: Sage Publications Ltd; 2001, 49-78

Abstract/Review/Citation: Describes the treatment of five traumatized children (aged 4-8 yrs) using adjunctive group art therapy, and reviews the theoretical basis for such a treatment strategy. All the children had been exposed to cumulative traumatic experiences of parental violence. The children presented symptoms of post-traumatic stress, developmental problems related to trauma, had difficulties with any discussion of traumatic events or family concerns, and reacted with hyperarousal and/or an 'emotional shutdown' response. Previous treatments included a combination of social, family, psychological and biological interventions. The group was a therapeutic intervention developed by a child psychiatrist and an art therapist to facilitate further therapeutic change. The therapeutic use of artworks facilitated exposure to traumatic cues in a less direct manner, allowed for desensitization of anxiety and unpleasant body sensations, helped the children recount the story of the parental separation and to label and articulate affective states using art and narrative. Positive family changes and coping skills the children were using to manage ongoing stresses were made overt. Positive expectations of the future were promoted. Key therapeutic and theoretical aspects of the group intervention are described.  ========================================

 

Title: Overcoming destructive beliefs, feelings, and behaviors:  New directions for Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Ellis, Albert

Source/Citation: Amherst, NY, US: Prometheus Books; 2001, (421)

Abstract/Review/Citation: This work is a description of the main principles and practices of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (REBT) by its founder, A. Ellis. In this book Ellis points out revisions he has made to his original therapy and examines the use of REBT in treating specific clinical problems.  Part I describes and explains the theory and practice of REBT while Part II discusses the use of REBT to treat specific types of psychological problems, including anxiety, addictive behaviors, post-traumatic stress, and obsessive compulsive disorder. This book may be of value to both professionals and laypersons. Methods and materials used at the Albert Ellis Institute, including the REBT Self-Help Form, are included in this book.

Notes/Comments: Acknowledgments Introduction

Part I: New directions for Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Profound therapy: Helping people to feel better and get better Using postmodernism and constructivism in psychotherapy Issues in counseling in the postmodern era Why Rational Emotive

Therapy to Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy?  REBT diminishes much of the human ego Special features of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy  The humanism of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy General semantics and Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy The main change agent in effective psychotherapy is specific technique and skill Brief therapy: The Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy method Vigorous REBT disputing and the technique of rational emotive imagery: Handouts for clients REBT and marriage and family therapy REBT and its application to group therapy The use of hypnosis and REBT REBT as an internal control psychotherapy The importance of cognitive processing in facilitating accepting in psychotherapy The rise of cognitive behavior therapy  The future of cognitive behavior therapy and Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy

Part II: Treating specific emotional and behavioral problems and severe personality disorders with Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Some main treatment practices of Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy Treating individuals with depressive disorders Treating individuals with anxiety disorders Treating individuals with low frustration tolerance Treating elderly people with emotional and behavioral disturbances Treating individuals with severe perfectionism Treating individuals with morbid jealousy Treating individuals with addictive behaviors Treating individuals with borderline personality disorders Treating individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorders  Treating individuals with post-traumatic stress disorders Tentative conclusion Selective references Index About the author A. Ellis; Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy; REBT; treatment; psychological disorders; destructive beliefs; destructive feelings; destructive behaviors ========================================

 

Title: Restorying trauma with narrative therapy: Using the phantom family.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Merscham, Carrie

Source/Citation: Family Journal-Counseling & Therapy for Couples & Families; Vol 8(3) Jul 2000, US: Sage Publications, Inc.; 2000, 282-286

Abstract/Review/Citation: Presents a family-focused example of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment using the narrative model of therapy. The narrative approach is a postmodern theory emphasizing the problem-saturated stories of lives, using a nonexpert-based therapeutic stance and focusing on a collaborative restorying of the client's life. As a case in point, Summer reported a long history of traumatic sexual abuse extending back to infancy, regarding cousins, boyfriends, and male stalkers. She reported stress and deep hatred of men, and believed she had little influence over her problems. She was interested in changing her life story, while recognizing that there were many items that she wanted to retain. Her PTSD symptoms were normalized. Summer built upon her positive relationship with her parents to overcome troubling dreams; her newly developed ability to reach out to others for help constituted a major change in her original story. ========================================

 

Title: Exploring the counselor's experience of working with perpetrators and survivors of domestic violence.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Iliffe, Gillian; Steed, Lyndall G.

Source/Citation: Journal of Interpersonal Violence; Vol 15(4) Apr 2000, US: Sage Publications Inc; 2000, 393-412

Abstract/Review/Citation: Examined the professional and personal impact on counselors from working with domestic violence (DV) clients. Semi-structured interviews with 18 counselors (mean age 45.8 yrs) having case loads of more than 50% DV clients yielded themes including initial impact of DV counseling, personal impact of hearing traumatic material, changes to cognitive schema, challenging issues for DV counselors, burnout, and coping strategies. Ss described classic symptoms of vicarious trauma, and reported changes in cognitive schema, particularly in regard to safety, world view, and gender power issues. Challenging aspects of DV counseling included changes in counseling practice to meet the unique needs of DV clients, difficulties with confidentiality, and feelings of isolation and powerlessness. 12 Ss reported feelings of burnout. Reported adaptive strategies included monitoring client caseloads, debriefing, peer support, self-care and political involvement for social change. ========================================

 

Title: Family guide to emotional wellness.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Fanning, Patrick; McKay, Matthew

Source/Citation: Oakland, CA, US: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.; 2000, (xi, 720)

Abstract/Review/Citation: This book is an encyclopedia of self-help first aid techniques, skill-building tips, worksheets, exercises, and information about a range of psychological and emotional concerns. Experienced family therapists show how to help children build self-esteem and learn stress-coping skills.

Relationship experts provide exercises and techniques to help couples enhance their communication and sex life. Tested strategies offer everyone tools for overcoming common addictions, such as drinking and smoking, and change behaviors and habits for more healthy lifestyles. Practical step-by-step suggestions help the entire family relax, reduce anxiety and stress, and enjoy life and each other. Also included is basic information about dealing with common problems such as eating disorders, depression, marital distress, panic attacks, worry, grief, traumatic events, and physical pain. The book is arranged by category, which allows the reader to easily access information about any particular issue.  This book was written by therapists, psychiatrists, social workers, counselors, medical doctors, and others with experience working with and writing for families. A complete reference for further reading is included.

Notes/Comments: Preface Acknowledgments Introduction

Part I: Getting along Couple skills Sex Anger Communication Step families Infidelity Caregiving

Part II: Kids Postpartum survival Parenting skills Kids and anger Children's sexuality--What is normal? Divorce and kids Trauma and kids Anxiety and kids

Part III: Consuming passions Eating disorders Body image Alcohol and drugs Smoking Gambling Internet addiction Part IV: Coping with physical problems Self-care and nurturing Premenstrual syndrome Perimenopause Menopause Testicular and prostrate cancer Chronic illness and pain Preparing for surgery

Part V: Coping with bad moods and painful feelings Stress Self-Esteem Uncovering automatic thoughts Changing patterns of limited thinking Changing hot thoughts Anxiety--Overview of the disorders Panic attacks Phobias Social phobia Obsessions and compulsions Traumatic experiences Grief Preparing for a parent's death Depression Suicide prevention

Part VI: Getting help Brief therapy Psychiatric drugs

Part VII: Optimizing your life Relaxation Meditation Visualization Dreams Further reading self-help guide for skill-building & other techniques for emotional wellness, families  ========================================

 

Title: The trauma client's experience of eye movement densensitization and reprocessing:  A heuristic analysis.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Schleyer, Marilyn A.

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences & Engineering; Vol 61(1-B) Jul 2000, US: Univ Microfilms International; 2000, 549

Abstract/Review/Citation: Traumatic stress and its impact on the individual, family and society have been described in the literature for over one hundred years. Controversy exists regarding etiology, determinants and therapeutic intervention for traumatic stress. There is limited research regarding the

comparative value of treatment of trauma. In 1989 Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) emerged as a therapeutic intervention for traumatic stress. Studies have shown the benefits of EMDR to be equal to or superior to those of other therapies in the treatment of PTSD. To date, the value of EMDR has been measured primarily by the decrease or amelioration of symptoms. Limited research has focused on the client's experience of EMDR and life changes after EMDR. The specific aim of this study was to: (a) generate a description of the personal experience of the EMDR process, (b) identify whether life changes had occurred after EMDR, and (c) if any life changes had occurred describe the changes and the nature of these changes. Data were collected via unstructured interviews with seven individuals who had experienced some form of trauma, and who had experienced EMDR as a therapeutic intervention for trauma. van Manen's and Heidegger's interpretive processes were used to guide the method of data analysis. The shared meanings identified were: (a) Set-up for Harm, (b) Being Stuck, (c) Willing to Risk in Spite of, (d) Release, (e) Movement and (f) Ongoing Movement. The participants all

described childhood events of being put in harms way. As adults participants felt frustrated with their inability to change personal and relational alienation which resulted from the childhood events. However, in spite of incredulity and fears, risking the experience of EMDR was primarily dependent on trust in the therapist. All experienced emotional, cognitive and physical release in response to the EMDR experience which allowed participants to move forward with their lives. ========================================

 

Title: 1/ Post traumatic stress disorder: Study of a population risk.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Gilaberte, I.; Baca, E.

Source/Citation: Archivos de Psiquiatria; Vol 63(3) Jul-Sep 2000, Spain: Fundacion Archivos de Neurobiologia; 2000, 259-271

Abstract/Review/Citation: All 94 police officers experiencing a traumatic event during 1990 provided data in a semi-structured interview. Of those, 31 fulfilled DSM-III-R criteria for PTSD. Logistic regression analysis identified feeling of risk to life during event, increment in family conflicts, and change in employment conditions as risk factors. Social support appeared as a protective factor. Three quarters of the officers also exhibited at least one concomitant psychiatric pathology ========================================

 

Title: Relatives' expressed emotion (EE) and PTSD treatment outcome.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Tarrier, Nicholas; Sommerfield, C.;

Pilgrim, H.

Source/Citation: Psychological Medicine; Vol 29(4) Jul 1999, US: Cambridge University Press; 1999, 801-811

Abstract/Review/Citation: Investigated the effect of expressed emotion (EE) on treatment outcome in chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The key relatives of 31 PTSD patients participating in a treatment trial comparing imaginal exposure with cognitive therapy were interviewed and rated on EE prior to treatment allocation. The effect of EE on post-treatment clinical outcomes was assessed. 16 patients (52%) had high EE and 15 (48%) low EE relatives. Patients with high EE relatives showed lesser change scores on the main outcome variable of the trial, the total Clinician Administered PTSD Scale score, and on all the secondary outcome variables than those with low EE relatives. Using different multiple regression models the EE scales of criticism and hostility predicted just under 20% of the greatest variance. These 2 scales were highly correlated and criticism marginally predicted the greatest variance

(19.7 %).

========================================

 

Title: The family and family therapy in international perspective.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Gielen, Uwe P.; Comunian, Anna Laura

Source/Citation: Trieste, Italy: Edizioni Lint Trieste; 1998, (503)

Abstract/Review/Citation: In this book, 35 authors and co-authors from 13 countries outline the dynamics occurring in the families of their countries and explain how they help families cope with change, crises, trauma, and other stressful circumstances.

Notes/Comments:  Armenia China India Israel Japan Saudi Arabia Turkey US Preface Foreword by Jefferson M. Fish Editors

Section I: Approaches to family therapy and counseling The evolution of family-systems theories Robert F. Massey A new three-dimensional model of family development embedded in culture Michele B. Thomas The forgotten others: The importance of prevention with couples and families Luciano L'Abate and

Mario Cusinato

Section II: Family counseling and ethnic diversity Counseling West Indian immigrant families in the United States Sharon-ann Gopaul-McNicol Counseling Arab-American Families Nuha Abudabbeh

Section III: Chinese families Filial piety and filicide in Chinese family relationships: The legend of Shun and other stories David Y. F. Ho The changing Chinese family: Resources, parenting practices, and children's socioemotional problems Xinyin Chen The impact of social change on family and marriage in China Heng-Yu Huang Structured family therapeutic interviews for Chinese psychiatric cases Shur-Fen Gau and Chu-Chang Chen Family therapy for Chinese Americans Diana Chen

Section IV: Families and family therapy in Asia Family psychology in Japan Tetsuo Okado Family therapy with Japanese families Kenji Kameguchi Couples and family therapy with Indian families: Some structural and intergenerational considerations Mudita Rastogi and Karen S. Wampler

Section V: Families in traumatic circumstances Help! My child has joined a cult Lita Linzer Schwartz Treatment of families in stress situations: Armenian refugees and earthquake survivors Meline Karakashian After the Holocaust: Therapy with survivors and their families Moshe Lang The longest shadow: A clinical commentary on Moshe Lang's paper Edwin Harari The longest shadow: Comments on Moshe Lang's paper Florence W. Kaslow Section VI: Attachment, care, and attachment-trauma Attachment theory and research: A look at intergenerational issues Isabel Soares and M. Carolina Silva Infant care and dual career parents: Ideas and tips Alice Sterling Honig Long-term effects of the Turkish home-based Early Enrichment program Sevda Bekman Family treatment of attachment trauma problems in children Beverly James

Section VII: Families with exceptional children Families with exceptional children Selma G. Sapir Child health-related cognitions of parents with autistic children: A cross-national exploratory study Paul Probst Family influences on the realization of scientific giftedness in Israeli adolescents: A follow-up study after 13 years Roberta M. Milgram and Eunsook Hong family dynamics & therapy to help cope with change & crises & trauma & other stressful circumstances, 13 countries ========================================

 

Title: Lifestyle, stress and hypertension: A case-study approach.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Edwards, David

Source/Citation: South African Journal of Psychology; Vol 27(1) Mar 1997, South Africa: Bureau for Scientific Publications; 1997, 22-29

Abstract/Review/Citation: Conducted 12 case studies of Xhosa women (aged 31-64 yrs) with limited education to assist in the development of hypertension interventions. First, a detailed assessment interview was used to construct a life history in which special attention was given to traumatic events, and develop a lifestyle analysis with special reference to known risk factors for hypertension. Second, the case was conceptualized in terms of targets and strategies for change within a cognitive-behavioral model. In the 3rd stage, in 7 cases, brief stress management interventions were implemented and monitored. Although uneducated township dwellers are often motivated to make lifestyle changes, the levels of stress that they endure are such that advice and brief interventions are likely to make little impact. Detailed conceptualizations of all cases were used to make recommendations regarding a non-pharmacological treatment approach in a primary health care setting. These included: (1) structured psychoeducational groups on weight reduction, physical fitness, anxiety management, assertiveness training, problem solving and anger management; (2) the opportunity for a personal counselling session; and (3) the possibility of specific referrals for bereavement therapy groups or family therapy.  ========================================

 

Title: Personality and personality disorder in the context of culture.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Lin, Keh-Ming

Source/Citation: Transcultural Psychiatry; Vol 34(4) Dec 1997, England: Sage Publications, Ltd.; 1997, 480-488

Abstract/Review/Citation: Comments on J. Paris's article on social factors in the personality disorders. By highlighting the

central importance of the complex and dynamic interactions of these factors (changes in family structures and parenting capacity, rapid social changes affecting the quality and stability of social support, and possibly childhood traumatic experiences), the article represents an important contribution in laying a solid foundation for the next generation of research. The discussion

topics include the comparison between "traditional" and

"modern" societies, the cultural construction of "personality disorders" and the categorical fallacy, the question of medicalization, trait- environmental fit versus focus on the individual, and other negative effects of the concept of personality. ========================================

 

Title: Management of post traumatic stress disorder using the technique of debriefing.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Eapen, V.; John, G.

Source/Citation: Arab Journal of Psychiatry; Vol 8(1) May 1997, Jordan: Arab Federation of Psychiatrists; 1997, 22-30

Abstract/Review/Citation: Presents a comprehensive treatment programme for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) using the technique of debriefing. Debriefing attempts to prevent the development of the initial response pattern of the individual to symptoms and then into a disorder. The individual usually perceives their experience following the traumatic event as abnormal reactions, and in debriefing, this is reframed as normal reactions to an abnormal event. The emphasis on the reactions as normal prevents cognitive reappraisal of oneself as abnormal when they experience the symptoms. The primary aim of debriefing is to reduce the negative impact of the event and to

speed up the recovery process. The case of a 7-yr-old female who was referred for an evaluation of her change in behavior and school refusal following a fire that engulfed part of her family home is presented to illustrate the use of the debriefing technique. ========================================

 

Title: Burden and coping among the relatives and carers of brain-injured survivors.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Mitchley, N.; Gray, J. M.; Pentland, B.

Source/Citation: Clinical Rehabilitation; Vol 10(1) Feb 1996, England: Edward Arnold; 1996, 3-8

Abstract/Review/Citation: Examined the nature of the residual coping and burden problems with relatives or carers of 23 traumatic brain injury patients. Ss were interviewed around 1 yr after patients' discharge from postacute rehabilitation. Relatives were under very considerable strain. Some response styles were associated with increased stress, but there was little evidence for the effectiveness of positive coping strategies in reducing stress. ========================================

 

Title: An examination of the personality structure of currently and formerly physically abused women in interpersonal relationships.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Lee-Hargrove, Elenora

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences & Engineering; Vol 56(10-B) Apr 1996, US: Univ. Microfilms International; 1996, 5816

Abstract/Review/Citation: The purpose of this investigation was to examine internal and external factors that may contribute to spousal abuse. Sixty participants, 47 currently and 13 formerly abused women who met the criteria for inclusion, participated in the study. All participants completed a questionnaire, the Conflict Tactic Scale (CTS), the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) basic content and supplementary scales, and the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II (MCMI-II). The data were analyzed by an Analysis of Variance (ANOVA), Pearson Correlation, Chi Square, and

descriptive statistics. The results of the ANOVA showed no significant difference between the currently and formerly abused groups on the MMPI-2 scales. However, currently and formerly abused women produced significant T-scores on scales measuring the battered woman profile (paranoia (6)

-schizophrenia (8) -psychopathic deviate (4)). When women scored in a positive direction for the battered woman profile, they scored in the opposite direction for Self-Defeating Personality Disorder (SDPD), indicating an inverse relationship between the two variables. A significant association was observed for women's performance on the SDPD and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) scales, in that, when women produced positive scores for SDPD, they scored negatively for PTSD. Women who scored within the range for the battered woman profile also produced significant scores for PTSD. In terms of reasons women gave for remaining in an abusive relationship, an overwhelming majority of these women indicated that they felt their safety would be jeopardized if they attempted to leave their partner. On the other hand, however, when fear was compared with a variety of factors for staying in the relationship, fear was reported less often. 'Children' and 'the belief that the mate would change and become nonabusive' were reasons given most frequently as women's decision to remain in an abusive relationship. ========================================

 

Title: A comparison of the long-term effects of bereavement after four types of death: Anticipated death, sudden death, drunk driver crash, and homicide.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Marcey, Marcella Mullady

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences & Engineering; Vol 56(11-B) May 1996, US: Univ. Microfilms International; 1996, 6399

Abstract/Review/Citation: After reviewing the relevant clinical and empirical work, this study sought to describe the long-term effects of bereavement and to explore risk factors associated with complicated and prolonged grief reactions. Data was collected through questionnaires and structured interviews with 80 participants from different families. Participants were matched across type of death groups based on their kinship bond with the deceased, and 60 of the 80 participants were parents of the deceased. Contrary to the original proposal, the type of death was not associated with prolonged complicated grief reactions. However, the survivor's perception of the cause of the death of a loved one was associated with all the indicators of prolonged difficult grief. Those who perceived the death as preventable, or preventable and intentional, were more likely to suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), experienced more intense grief and grief related anger, and dealt with more symptoms of depression and guilt. No other factors were associated with

differences in symptomatology. Thus a death that is viewed by loved ones as preventable is associated with the development of PTSD. While grief appears to be a process that moves toward resolution, PTSD can last for many years with little change. It is suggested that it is the perception of the death as preventable associated with the development of PTSD that makes it more difficult to recover from a preventable death. It is further suggested that treatment of prolonged complicated bereavement should focus on treating PTSD so that the grief process can move forward. Issues relating to perceived social support, self-esteem, guilt, and satisfaction with the criminal justice system are also discussed. ========================================

 

Title: A longitudinal study of the impact of acute pediatric trauma on the stress factors and coping patterns of the family.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Naylor, Deborah Johnson

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences & Engineering; Vol 57(1-B) Jul 1996, US: Univ. Microfilms International; 1996, 0241

Abstract/Review/Citation: The purpose of the study was threefold for families whose child experienced an acute traumatic injury: (a) to identify the prominent stress factors and usual coping patterns of families over time, (b) to describe family situational/demographic variables which can influence the family's response (family functioning level, actual severity of illness and SES), and (c) to examine the changes over time in the family's stress/coping patterns and the parental perception of illness severity. Data were collected from 32 primary parental caretakers whose child was admitted with a blunt traumatic injury to one of two urban university Pediatric trauma centers. The family's response to trauma was assessed at three district periods following the injury: (a) 24-72 hrs, (b) 25-45 days, and (c) 80-100 days using correlational repeated measures design. The subjects were: (a) primarily of African American (48.5%) and Caucasian (42.4%) races; (b) predominately mothers (91%) with a high school diploma/equivalent (51%); and (c) of low to

middle to middle family social strata (57.4%). Each subject completed assessment tools designed to measure the impact of trauma on family stress/coping patterns (Parental Stressor Scale and F-COPES), parental perception of illness severity (Parental Perception of Seriousness of Illness Ladder), and demographic/situational variables (Family APGAR, Posttraumatic Functional Rating Scale, Abbreviated Injury Scale). Analysis of the findings revealed a significant change across time in stress/coping patterns and parental perception of illness severity. Parental stress significantly increased from Period 1 to Period 2 and significantly decreased from Period 2 to Period 3. Significant family stressors at Period 1 and 2 were ineffective staff communication, and parental role changes. Significant stressors at Period 3 were alterations in issues in family life and behavioral/emotional responses in the child. Family coping significantly increased across all three periods. ========================================

 

Title: Anomie and identification: Adjustment experiences of recent immigrants from mainland China in Toronto.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Zhang, Gloria Rong

Source/Citation: Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities & Social Sciences; Vol 57(4-A) Oct 1996, US: University Microfilms International; 1996, 1507

Abstract/Review/Citation: This dissertation investigates the adjustment experiences of 80 immigrants from Mainland China in Toronto utilizing a structured personal interview technique. The major issues of this study were developed from recognized theoretical principles not applied in earlier immigrant studies. Accepting Durkheim's contention that sudden social change

impedes the effective functioning of individuals in society, it was proposed that the immigrant perceives the mainstream Canadian society and its cultural settling as incomprehensible, unpredictable and even hostile. The result is personal anomie. The concept of anomie was reformulated to specifically reflect the post-arrival traumatic experience of racially and culturally

different immigrants from developing countries. A new measure based on Srole's anomie scale was devised to reflect this experience. The theoretical approach applied further encompasses the contention that revised identification patterns may determine the immigrant's resocialization and therefore influence the direction and quality of the integration process. This issue was investigated through theoretical categories based on contemporary theory, supplemented by qualitative information. The results indicate that the effects of resettlement trauma, in particular anomie, were contained reasonably well,

possibly as the result of strong family ties, suggesting retreatism in the sense of Merton. The experiences of the group only marginally conformed to the results of a number of prior studies, which stress that the institutional completeness of ethnic organizations and facilities as well as residential concentration are important to implement and sustain ethnic group integration. Although the respondents largely lived in Chinese dominated areas and relied substantially on Chinese social and economic support, the majority regard these two features as transitional accommodating facilities rather than expressions of ethnic attachment and emotional commitment.  ========================================

 

Title: The life model of social work practice:  Advances in theory & practice (2nd ed.).

Author(s)/Editor(s): Germain, Carel B.; Gitterman, Alex

Source/Citation: New York, NY, US: Columbia University Press; 1996, (xii, 490)

Abstract/Review/Citation: In this edition, [the authors] have adopted a . . . new "life course" model of human development, which incorporates into the ecological [approach to practice] an understanding of the unique experience of each individual within its historical, societal, and cultural context.  The new edition also provides practitioners with [a] schema for assessment and intervention with respect to difficult life transitions and

traumatic events, environmental pressures, and dysfunctional interpersonal processes. Practice illustrations have been updated to reflect today's major social issues, including AIDS, homelessness and violence.  The authors develop [an] integrated practice model, specifiying the common foundation of

social work knowledge, methods, and skills as well as those specific to individual, family, group, and community practice. The social work practitioner's responsibilities are . . . expanded to include community, organizational, and legislative influence and change.  With its focus on social work's distinctive mission and function and on the creative application of professional methods and skills, [this book is intended] for social work students and practitioners.

Notes/Comments:  Preface Acknowledgments

Part 1: Overview The ecological perspective The life model of social work practice: A brief overview

Part 2: The helping process in life-modeled practice Initial phase

Beginnings: Auspice, modalities, methods, and skills Ongoing phase Helping individuals, families, and groups with stressful life transitions and traumatic events Helping individuals, families, and groups with environmental stressors Helping with dysfunctional family processes Helping with dysfunctional group processes Reducing interpersonal stress between worker and client Ending phase Endings: Auspice, modalities, methods, and skills

Part 3: Life-modeled practice at community, organization, and political levels Influencing community and neighborhood life Influencing the practitioner's organization Influencing legislation, regulations, and electoral politics

Epilogue

Appendix A: Codes of ethics NASW Code of Ethics (1993) CASW Social Work Code of Ethics (1994)

Appendix B: Social work practice research traditions Notes References Index life course model of individual & family & group & community social work practice ========================================

 

Title: Search for the Tourette syndrome and human behavior genes.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Comings, David E.

Source/Citation: Duarte, CA, US: Hope Press; 1996, (iv, 309)

Abstract/Review/Citation: In "Search for the Tourette Syndrome and Human Behavior Genes" Dr. Comings tells the story of his 18 yrs involvement with the Tourette Syndrome, from both the level of treating thousands of patients with this common and complex disorder, to his clinical, genetic and

molecular genetic research. . . . His patients and their relatives had problems with a wide range of behaviors including attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), obsessive-compulsive behaviors, conduct and oppositional defiant disorder, rages, mania, depression, anxiety, panic attacks, phobias, sexual, sleep, and other disorders. Because Tourette syndrome is genetic, this involvement with a spectrum of disorders had broad

implications about the causes of behaviors that most mental health workers attributed to psychological problems, poor parenting, or learned behaviors.  His genetic studies led him to eventually conclude that Tourette syndrome was a polygenic disorder caused by the coming together from both parents of a

number of genes affecting dopamine, serotonin, and other brain chemicals. Dr. Comings relates how the concept that many human behavioral disorders were genetically interrelated was initially ridiculed.  These attitudes began to change as others reported similar findings and as this concept gained support

from molecular genetic studies of specific genes.

Notes/Comments:  (Abbreviated) Foreward by John Ratey A

note about reading this book Introduction Before Tourette syndrome The XYY affair The early years The exhibitionist The genetics of TS Conduct problems in Tourette syndrome ADHD and Tourette syndrome The controlled study Serotonin and tryptophan The visual field studies The Pauls letter The presidential address The Arno episode The controlled family history studies Is the TDO2 gene the "alcoholism gene"? The book The hypothetical Gts mutation The American Psychiatric Association TS symposium The dopamine receptors and the "alcoholism gene" The other tryptophan gene The rebuttals of the non-believers The regulatory region at last The GREs The trip to South Africa The summer of '91 The frustration continues The dopamine receptor studies revisited Post-traumatic stress disorder Drug addiction A gene for obesity A gene for height The dopamine D3 receptor gene Polygenic inheritance SIDS The genetic loading technique Yale "confirms" our findings Irritable

bowel syndrome--a genetic disorder? The Gts genes and drug and alcohol abuse The genetics of sexual behavior The genetics of conduct disorder The genetics of depression Tourette syndrome as a spectrum disorder Selection for the Gts genes Dopamine receptor genes and smoking Pathological gambling Monoamine oxidase Cancer genes and human behavior A marker of the TDO2 gene Searching for the 'real" TDO2 mutation The TDO2 mutations in patients The Yale group claims depression and anxiety are not related to Gts genes The dopamine receptor gene in Tourette syndrome--Again Dopamine beta-hydroxylase The dopamine transporter gene The polygenic inheritance of behavior Epilogue References Appendix: Update on new medications Abbreviations, definitions, glossary Index genetics & brain chemistry & heritability of Tourette syndrome & other disorders

========================================

 

Title: Integrating family therapy:  Handbook of family psychology and systems theory.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Mikesell, Richard H.; Lusterman, Don-David; McDaniel, Susan H.

Source/Citation: Washington, DC, US: American Psychological Association; 1995, (xvii, 645)

Abstract/Review/Citation: "Integrating Family Therapy" brings together family psychology and systems theory to explore the ways that systems therapists actually think and behave to bring about needed family change in the context of other systems. The theme of integration is carried through the book on several levels: integration of the family with school, work, medical, and other social systems; integration of research, theory, and systemic practice; and integration of methods and techniques from diverse schools of family therapy.  With generous illustrative case material, [this volume] suggests . . . ways of helping families in the current social context.

Notes/Comments: Print (Paper) Human 10 (Abbreviated) Preface Introduction

Part I: Clinical principles of systems therapy Core techniques in family therapy  David Seaburn, Judith Landau-Stanton and Susan Horwitz Collaborative language systems: Toward a postmodern therapy  Harlene D. Anderson Engaging the family: An integrative approach  Timothy Weber and Felise Levine Open-ended therapy: Termination in marital and family therapy  Jay Lebow Part II: Developmental issues in families The family life cycle: Phases, stages, and crises  Randy Gerson Children and family therapy: Mainstream approaches and the special case of the multicrisis poor  Patricia Minuchin Systems-oriented therapy with

stepfamilies  James H. Bray Interventions with later life families  Cleveland G. Shields, Deborah A. King and Lyman C. Wynne

Part III: Assessment and research in family psychology Marital and family assessment: A multifaceted, multilevel approach  Douglas K. Snyder, Timothy A. Cavell, Robert W. Heffer and Laurel F. Mangrum The evolution of family-based psychopathology  David J. Miklowitz Family therapy research  James Alexander and Cole Barton Circumplex model of family systems: Integrating ethnic diversity and other social systems

Dean M. Gorall and David H. Olson

Part IV: Therapy with couples A family systems approach to sex therapy and intimacy  David M. Schnarch Treating marital infidelity  Don-David Lusterman The dynamics of divorce therapy 

Florence W. Kaslow Divorce mediation: A system for dealing with the family in transition  S. Richard Sauber, Stephen F. Beiner and Gail S. Meddoff

Part V: Gender and ethnic issues Intergender communication and gender-sensitive family therapy  Carol L. Philpot and Gary Brooks Lesbian and gay family psychology  Roy Scrivner and Natalie S. Eldridge Ethnic dimensions in family treatment  Joe Giordano and Mary Ann Carini-Giordano Therapy with African American inner-city families  Nancy Boyd-Franklin VI: Medical systems Medical family therapy with somatizing patients: The co-creation of therapeutic stories  Susan H. McDaniel, Jeri Hepworth and William Doherty A family systems approach to coping with cancer  David K. Wellisch A customized approach to the treatment of anorexia and bulimia  William N. Friedrich Infertility and pregnancy loss: The role of the family consultant  Susan G. Mikesell and Margaret Stohner A developmental biopsychosocial approach to the treatment of chronic illness in children and adolescents  Beatrice L. Wood

Part VII: Other larger systems and contexts The changing family-work system  Sylvia Shellenberger and Sandra S. Hoffman Family-school intervention  Marvin J. Fine

Part VIII: Coercion and substance abuse Domestic violence and sexual abuse: Multiple systems perspectives  Robert Geffner, Mary Jo Barrett and B. B. Robbie Rossman Cults: Implications for family therapists  Margaret Thaler Singer Family treatment of alcohol and drug abuse  M. Duncan Stanton and Anthony W. Heath Part IX: The self of the systems therapist Family therapy

supervision: Toward an integrative perspective  Douglas C. Breunlin, Cheryl Rampage and Marina L. Eovaldi Ethical dilemmas in change of format and live supervision  Michael C. Gottlieb Systemic traumatization: Secondary traumatic stress disorder in family therapists   Charles R. Figley

Part X: Future directions for family psychology and systems From family damage to family challenge Froma Walsh Author index Subject index List of contributors About the editors integration of social systems & research & therapeutic techniques in systems oriented family therapy, handbook  ========================================

 

Title: Helping the victims of disasters.

Author(s)/Editor(s): McFarlane, Alexander C.

Source/Citation: Traumatic stress:  From theory to practice., New York, NY, US: Plenum Press; 1995, (xvii, 402), 287-314 Plenum series on stress and coping.

Source editor(s): Freedy, John R. (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: examines the various ways in which mental health professionals can assist in the psychological care and rehabilitation of disaster victims [discusses] the impact of trauma upon clinical judgment and personal well-being of the professional / emphasizes the complex and evolving nature of disasters by recommending that interventions can occur at 5 phases in time ranging from before to following the disaster (planning, threat, inventory and rescue, remedy, recovery) / states that the nature of intervention will change in each time phase / discusses a biopsychosocial model for individual mental health risk or resiliency that can be considered in light of the 5 stages of intervention / appropriate assessment (interview and self-report) and treatment strategies are considered / emphasizes both prevention and treatment / [discusses] the common elements in successful mental health treatment, emphasizing a flexible clinical approach that integrates biological and psychosocial approaches / ends with a series of . . . case examples that illustrate a range of clinical concerns (e.g., brief

interventions, control issues, death, family issues, depression, emergency service personnel, and dissociative symptoms)  ========================================

 

Title: Traumatic memories: Empirical foundations, forensic and clinical implications.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Koss, Mary P.; Tromp, Shannon; Tharan, Melinda

Source/Citation: Clinical Psychology: Science & Practice; Vol 2(2) Sum 1995, England: Oxford Univ Press; 1995, 111-132

Abstract/Review/Citation: Reviews empirical research on memories for negative personal experiences among adults. The author examines basic concepts (including neural underpinnings), theoretical models of the affect-memory relationship, and data from 3 sources: victims or witnesses to crimes and atrocities, "flashbulb memories" for traumatic events, and laboratory simulations of shocking experiences. Evidence suggests that memories for traumatic experiences contain more central than peripheral detail, are reasonably accurate and well-retained for very long periods, but are not completely indelible. Assertions of eyewitness memory's vulnerability to change through suggestion have overstated the evidence. Forensic and clinical implications are discussed and a plea issued for more study of the memory phenomena that characterize posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and are the focus of trauma survivors' treatment. ========================================

 

Title: Posttraumatic stress recovery of terrorist survivors.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Ayalon, Ofra

Source/Citation: International handbook of traumatic stress syndromes., New York, NY, US: Plenum Press; 1993, (xxxiii, 1011), 855-866 The Plenum series on stress and coping.

Source editor(s): Wilson, John Preston (Ed)

Abstract/Review/Citation: [discuss] the therapeutic and diagnostic aspects of the injury in 3 out of 15 terrorist attacks which involved kidnapping and face-to-face killing of Israeli civilians in the years 1974 to 1980 / deal with the psychological harm caused by personal, communal, and societal trauma and examine the means of therapeutic intervention / phenomenological approach to the evaluation of coping [circles of support, community support systems during a tragedy, crisis without aid, stress inoculation: preventive care, brief group therapy for a near-miss population] / mass media and treatment [individual therapy for media-publicized bereavement] / from getting help to giving help: a role change / strategic method of short-term family therapy ========================================

 

Title: Substance abuse treatment:  A family systems perspective.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Freeman, Edith M.

Source/Citation: Thousand Oaks, CA, US: Sage Publications, Inc; 1993, (xv, 316) Sage sourcebooks for the human services series, Vol. 25.

Abstract/Review/Citation: The primary purpose of this book is to describe some important aspects of substance abuse treatment within the context of the family--the system most directly affected by the presence of substance abuse problems in one or more of its members. This focus on treatment of families and on family issues is extremely important, especially when the family is viewed as a system with relationships and norms that may contribute to, as well as help resolve, the addiction problems of a member.   A secondary purpose of the book is to explore some of the common family life span issues

that make substance abuse treatment with families a complex and difficult endeavor.  [The volume] highlights the value and importance of the range of professional disciplines involved in providing substance abuse treatment to families: addiction counselors, social workers, psychiatrists, nurses, psychologists, sex therapists, mental health therapists, rehabilitation counselors, and physical and occupational therapists.

Notes/Comments:  Foreword [by] Man Keung Ho Preface and

acknowledgments [by] Edith M. Freeman Substance abuse treatment: Continuum of care in services to families  Edith M. Freeman I: Substance abuse treatment across the life span [by] Edith M. Freeman A cross-cultural treatment approach for families with young children  Ruth G. McRoy, Marian A. Aguilar and Clayton T. Shorkey Developing alternative family structures for runaway, drug-addicted adolescents  Edith M. Freeman A culturally specific approach to ethnic minority young adults  Jacob U. Gordon Alcohol addiction and codependency  Clayton T. Shorkey and Willa Rosen Treatment for dually diagnosed clients 

Marsha R. Read, Elizabeth C. Penick and Elizabeth J. Nickel The impact of substance abuse and post-traumatic stress disorder  Robert Fahnestock Alcohol addiction and sexual dysfunction  Stephanie Covington Self-medication and the elderly  Brenda Crawley II: Research and evaluation of substance abuse

services from a family systems perspective [by] Edith M. Freeman Single system research in family-focused alcohol treatment  Edith M. Freeman Evaluating alcohol and other drug abuse programs  Michael S. Cunningham Epilogue: The family system recovery process: What is lasting change? [by] Edith M. Freeman Author index Subject index About the authors discusses a family-systems approach to the treatment of drug abuse ========================================

 

Title: The warrior heritage:  A psychological perspective of Cambodian trauma.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Bit, Seanglim

Source/Citation: El Cerrito, CA, US: Seanglim Bit; 1991, (xix, 233)

Abstract/Review/Citation: "The Warrior Heritage" is the first

scholarly effort to examine, from the Cambodian perspective, the psychological dimensions of the profound trauma referred to as the "Cambodian genocide."  This book develops a cultural context from which to better understand the ongoing traumatic events which have enveloped the Cambodian people. From previous images of a peaceful, if somewhat exotic country,

Cambodia has exploded into world consciousness in scenes of devastation, death and the "killing fields." The author explains both the psychological roots of a genocide which consumed up to 2 million victims, and the characteristics of inner strength derived from the same culture which enabled individuals to survive, and even flourish, in the aftermath of the catastrophe.

Notes/Comments: Cambodia (Abbreviated) Acknowledgements

Preface Introduction

Part one: Cultural heritage Psychological origins of national identity Development of cultural values Change in Cambodian culture

Part two: Foundations of society Organization of society Religion Political organization The family The roles of males and females Education Economy Social class Rural/urban differentiation Dissemination of information Cultural art Social behavior Authoritarianism Aggression and violence Conflict resolution Concepts of leadership Pro-social behavior Ethnic relations Oral traditions Codes of behavior Social control Reliance on counselors The trauma impact of Cambodian society Loss of self-esteem Institutions in society Corruption Interpersonal relationships State of the family Lack of healing process Acceptable outlets for rage and frustration Loss of human resources Vulnerable populations

Part three: The individual Cambodian The Cambodian psychological behavior Child development Trust vs. non-trust Self-perception Denial of reality Pessimistic outlook Diffusion of responsibility Joyfulness vs despair Personal security Threat and fear The trauma experience and its impact on the individual Depression Conversion disorder Post traumatic stress disorder Denial Dissociation Physio-psychological defenses Aggression Avoidant behavior Conflicting disclosure The Cambodian ascendant personality The development for a just Cambodia Economic development Human rights Harmonious problem solving Foreign involvement Conclusion References Suggested readings

Appendix I: United Nations: The situation in Cambodia

Appendix II: Third Committee of Paris Conference

Appendix III: Sihanouk, Hun Sen Joint Communique Index examines the psychological dimensions of the "Cambodian genocide"

========================================

 

Title: Stressful life events.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Miller, Thomas W.

Source/Citation: Madison, CT, US: International Universities Press, Inc; 1989, (xxvi, 807) International Universities Press stress and health series, Monograph 4.

Abstract/Review/Citation: This book is designed to incorporate into this four-volume series on stress the latest information related to understanding stressful life events and their impact on our lives.  Theoretical formulations and hypotheses, issues, and implications related to the validity and

reliability of life stress measurement and its applications to both medical and mental health related concerns are addressed here.  In addition, special attention is given to the individual and how that individual functions within the family in terms of stress and coping.  This book views the person  as both a producer of stress and a reactor to stress and attempts to identify a

variety of sources of stress both from within and beyond the individual's life space.  This text is directed toward the myriad of health care deliverers and gathers together representative authorities in each of the areas presented.  Many of these individuals have pioneered extremely fruitful research, and their understanding of certain pathogenic mainstream concepts

that are useful in defining, analyzing, and treating stress-related disorders is broad based.  There are several rich perspectives that effectively integrate the variety of generalizations about functional and dysfunctional aspects of stress.  Life-event research has become a focus of our understanding of the relationship between psychological stress and physical illness.  Our purpose is to examine and summarize clinical and research

evidence addressing the assessment of stressful life events, prominent scales for the measurement of stressful life events, and various issues and implications for both clinical and research applications.  A perspective on critical directions which might yet emerge in this most significant arena of study is offered in this text.   Examined herein are prominent measures of life events and the issues and implications which emerge when employing life events scaling in the process of researching psychological well-being. Captured in this volume are the major theories underlying life stress events and their impact on our lives.  In addition, several of the most recognized measures of stressful life events are summarized and reviewed, as are the numerous medical and psychiatric conditions that often result from stressful life experiences.  Finally, a life-span review of the current issues in understanding stressful life events is presented with an international perspective on its impact on children, adolescents, adults, and te elderly in several everyday life situations.

Notes/Comments:  Contributors Preface

Part I:  Theoretical considerations in stressful life events Recent life change stress and psychological depression  Richard H. Rahe Life events and interdependent lives:  Implications for research and intervention  R. A. Pruchno, F. C. Blow and M. A. Smyer Conceptual and theoretical problems in the measurement of life stress  Thomas W. Miller Life events and schizophrenia:  The "triggering" hypothesis  R. Day Why do unpredictable events lead to reports of physical symptoms?  Karen A. Matthews, Michael F. Scheier, Bradford I. Brunson and Bernardo Carducci

Part II:  Assessment and methodological issues in stressful life events Life-event scaling:  Clinical methodological issues  Thomas W. Miller Reliability of life-event ratings:  An independent

replication  Glenys Parry, David A. Shapiro and Lisa Davies Reliability of life-event interviews with outpatient schizophrenics  Richard Neugebauer Is there a short-cut?  An investigation into the life-event interview  P. McC. Miller and D. P. Salter Personal assessments of life-event stress and the near future onset of psychological symptoms  D. G. Byrne The stability of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Trait Anxiety Scale  Melissa A. Elkind and

Anthony J. DeVito Stress as a potential barrier to the search for health  R. Barker Bausell and S. Petchel Damrosch

Part III:  Life stress and behavioral medicine Life events and myocardial infarction  G. Magni, A. Corfini, F. Berto, R. Rizzardo, S. Bombardelli and G. Miraglia Personal determinants of life-event stress and myocardial infarction  D. G. Byrne Stressful life events associated with bulimia in anorexia nervosa:  Empirical findings and theoretical speculations  Michael Strober Life stress measures and reported frequency of sleep disorders  Zack Zdenek Cernovsky Dysfunctional uterine bleeding and prior life stress  Fred Tudiver End-stage renal disease as a stressful life event  Edward Stodola and Thomas W. Miller Life events and psychological distress in dermatologic disorders:  Psoriasis, chronic urticaria, and fungal infections  Giovanni A. Fava, Giulia I. Perini, Paolo Santonastaso and Cleto Veller Fornasa Stress and coping of wives following their husbands' strokes  Dennis van Uitert, Raina Eberly and Brian Engdahl

Part IV:  Life events and mental illness Stress and schizophrenia:  Some definitional issues  Bonnie Spring Recent stressful life events and episodes of schizophrenia  Bruce P. Dohrenwend and Gladys Egri The interaction of life events and relatives' expressed emotion in schizophrenia and depressive neurosis  Julian Leff and Christine Vaughn Life events, familial stress, and coping in the developmental course of schizophrenia  David Lukoff, Karen Snyder, Joseph Ventura and Keith H. Neuchterlein Life events and personality traits in obsessive-compulsive neurosis  Joseph McKeon, Bridget Roa and Anthony Mann Life events and personality characteristics in depression  H. Perris Life events and early and late onset of bipolar disorder  Barry Glassner and C. V. Haldipur Life events occurring before and after onset of depression in a Kenyan setting--any significance?  D. M. Ndetei and A. Vadher

Part V:  Posttraumatic stress:  The Vietnam experience The etiologies of Vietnam posttraumatic stress syndrome  Harry D. Silsby and Franklin D. Jones Posttraumatic stress disorder:  Psychometric assessment and race  Walter Penk, Ralph Robinowitz, Dovalee Dorsett, William Bell and John Black Traumatic stress disorder:  Diagnostic and clinical issues in psychiatry  Thomas W. Miller and N. Donald Feibelman Factitious posttraumatic stress disorder:  The veteran who never got to Vietnam  Edward J. Lynn and Mark Belza Chemotherapy of traumatic war stress  J. Ingram Walker

Part VI:  Family and life span development:  Issues in stressful life events Relationship of family life events, maternal depression, and child-rearing problems  D. M. Fergusson, L. J. Horwood and F. T. Shannon Family life events, maternal depression, and maternal and teacher descriptions of child behavior  D. M. Fergusson, L. J. Horwood, M. E. Gretton and F. T. Shannon Stressful life events and somatic complaints in adolescents  John W. Greene, Lynn S. Walker, Gerald Hickson and Juliette Thompson Parenting children in a stressful medical situation  Joseph P. Bush, Barbara G. Melamed and Carolyn S. Cockrell Contested child custody as a stressful life event  Lane Veltkamp and Thomas W. Miller Factors contributing to teacher stress  Robert G. Harrington, Judith A. Burry and Dennis Pelsma Coping with stress:  Differences among working families  Elaine A. Anderson and Leigh A. Leslie The 50-year-old woman and midlife stress  Shirley Campbell Multifactoral stressors in life change events for the elderly patient  Thomas W. Miller and Louis L. Jay Future concerns and recent life events of elderly community residents  Shayna Stein, Margaret W. Linn, Elisa Slater and Elliot M. Stein Concluding thoughts on stressful life events Name

Index Subject Index ========================================

 

Title: Homesickness, cognition, and health.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Fisher, Shirley

Source/Citation: Hillsdale, NJ, England: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc; 1989, (xv, 152)

Abstract/Review/Citation: Homesickness is a topic which has been neglected in research. It focuses on preoccupation with home, family and friends and is further manifest in terms of distress such as depression, anxiety, obsessionality, absent mindedness and physical symptoms. It has much in common with agitated depression and is in many ways similar to bereavement, and could be described as a form of post-traumatic stress syndrome.  "Homesickness" will be of considerable interest to all those who have counselling or care-giving roles. An attentional resource model of homesickness experience is developed, and the implications for self help and counselling are considered. The book will also be of interest to cognitive psychologists, since investigation of the cognitive basis of homesickness provides information into the way in which planning processes operate, and in this sense there is a contribution to the understanding of cognitive factors in change and transition.

Notes/Comments:  Acknowledgements Preface Geographical transitions: Context-dependent effects and the concept of

congruence Contextual factors and personal decision Theories of the psychological effects of change and transition The incidence and features of homesickness Episodic homesickness reporting: The implications for attentional resources The cognitive basis of homesickness experience The correlates of homesickness: Associated psychological states and health Homesickness,

psychological disturbance, and health Sex differences in psychological disturbance Circumstantial and vulnerability factors in homesickness Situational factors and the competing demands model Thinking homesick: The implications of differences in cognitive organisation and memory Homesickness, commitment, and the job strain model Cognitive appraisal, commitment, and adaptation Sources of strain in educational environments Cognitive appraisals in the post-transition environment A multi-causal cognitive theory of homesick experience Theories of homesickness and the attentional resource model Helping the homesick: An attentional management approach The efficacy of

stress-management programmes

Appendix: The Dundee relocation inventory: A diagnostic test for the assessment of homesickness and distress following transition References Author index Subject index ========================================

 

Title: Handbook of life stress, cognition and health.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Fisher, Shirley; Reason, James

Source/Citation: Oxford, England: John Wiley & Sons; 1988, (xxxiii, 750) Description/Edition Info.: Edited Book; 140

Abstract/Review/Citation: This handbook brings together work on the effect of life events on psychological and physical well being, with work on the role of life events in relation to abnormal behaviour and illness, in order to pursue the role of personal meanings and knowledge as mediating factors.  Models of stress and illness based on sociological, psychological and psychobiological principles are described and the links with intervention and therapy are developed.  Unlike other books on this subject, this volume combines work on specific stresses with work on cognitive factors in order to predict reaction--the book addresses the question of why some people become ill or mentally disturbed, and why others do not. This book will be essential reading for all those--researchers, students and practitioners in cognitive psychology, health psychology, behavioural and social medicine--who come in contact with people experiencing stressful life events.

Notes/Comments:  List of contributors Preface [by] Shirley Fisher Acknowledgements

Section IA: Specific life stresses Expectant parenthood  Yona Teichman Stress in childhood and

adolescence  Ian Goodyer Leaving home: Homesickness and the psychological effects of change and transition  Shirley Fisher Bereavement  Frances Clegg Impending surgery  Marie Johnston Victims of violence  Ronnie Janoff-Bulman Environmental and nuclear threats  Jennifer Brown

Section IB: Stressful social contexts Marriage, separation and divorce  Raymond Cochrane Family stress  Abe Fosson Women's work and family roles: Sources of stress and sources of strength  Janet E. Malley and Abigail J. Stewart Psychosocial factors in the workplace  Rudolf H. Moos The experience of unemployment in social context  David Fryer

Section II: Life events and disorder Life events and mental disorder  Eugene Paykel and D. Dowlatshahi Lethal stress: A social-behavioral model of suicidal behavior  Marsha M. Linehan and Edward N. Shearin Life events, stress and addiction  Fiona O'Doherty and John Booth Davies Stress and heart disease  Bruce Boman Recent life changes and coronary heart disease: 10

years' research  Richard Rahe Stress, disability and handicap  Christina Knussen and Cliff C. Cunningham Anorexia nervosa  Rachel Bryant-Waugh Personality, life stress and cancerous disease  Cary L. Cooper Stress and diabetes  Clare Bradley Section III: Cognitive factors which influence stress and health Stress and cognitive failure  James Reason Explanation and

adaptation in adversity  Chris R. Brewin Early loss of parent and depression in adult life  George W. Brown Trait anxiety and stress  Michael W. Eysenck Learned resourcefulness, stress and self-regulation  Michael Rosenbaum Putting the life back into 'life events': Toward a cognitive social learning analysis of the coping process  Suzanne M. Miller and Adina Birnbaum Social support and stress: Perspectives and processes  Jacques A. M. Winnubst, Bram P. Buunk and Frans H. G. Marcelissen Section IV: Social cognitive and biological models of stress and illness Stress, language and illness  Richard Totman Life events, social cognition and depression  Keith Oatley Psychobiological interaction in depression  Paul Gilbert Life stress, control strategies and the risk of disease: A psychobiological model  Shirely Fisher Psychobiological factors in stress and health  Tom Cox Allostasis: A new paradigm to explain arousal pathology  Peter Sterling and Joseph Eyer

Section V: Cognitive developments with implications for coping and health Helping people cope with the long-term effects of stress  Ian Howarth and Inez Dootjes Dussuyer Confiding traumatic experiences and health  James W. Pennebaker Stress and mental control  Daniel M. Wegner The costs and benefits of coping  Wolfgang Schoenpflug and Wolfgang Battmann Author index Subject index  ========================================

 

Title: Understanding identity disruption and intimacy: One aspect of post-traumatic stress.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Young, Mitchell B.

Source/Citation: Contemporary Family Therapy: An International Journal; Vol 10(1) Spr 1988, US: Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers; 1988, 30-43

Abstract/Review/Citation: Details the change taking place in the mental processes of trauma victims and the subsequent disruption of identity and intimacy. It is contended that for those who experience a traumatic incident, concepts of self and world views may be broken. The psychic disruption of the symbolic processes attendant to traumatic events may interfere with recovery. Lacking a strong sense of self and feeling blameful for what they have experienced, trauma victims may become unable to sustain intimate relationships and romantic dyads. At the same time, symbolic processes become impaired and identity is marked by separation, disintegration, and stasis. Healing occurs when all aspects of the traumatic incident, cognitive and emotional, are integrated into self-concepts.  ========================================

 

Title: Psychological and forensic considerations in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Singer, Barton A.

Source/Citation: American Journal of Forensic Psychology; Vol 1(3) 1983, US: American Coll of Forensic Psychology; 1983, 3-11

Abstract/Review/Citation: Discusses problems in understanding the nature of posttraumatic stress disorders and special complications in treatment. Clinical and forensic issues are illustrated using the case of a 19-yr-old man who had been severely injured in an automobile accident. The S was predisposed to this disorder because of traits of passivity and dependency and a pathological inability to modulate anger in the context of the traumatic event that aroused intense affects of fear and rage. Problems in treatment included the S's readiness to externalize and blame all problems on the accident; litigation that focused on the effects of the accident and emphasized the sick role, making it more difficult to resolve the emotional conflicts concerning the disability; and the secondary gain with family members, the legal process, and compensation, which increased resistance to change. (5 ref)  ========================================

 

Title: Life graphs and life events.

Author(s)/Editor(s): Bourque, Linda B.; Back, Kurt W.

Source/Citation: Journal of Gerontology; Vol 32(6) Nov 1977, US: Gerontological Society of America; 1977, 669-674

Abstract/Review/Citation: Investigated changes in personal satisfaction over the whole life course by means of life graphs and their determinants in an ongoing longitudinal adaptation study designed to investigate the interplay between physical condition and psychological and social events. The life graphs were administered within a 4-yr interval to 371 individuals (age 45-70). A modified version of the Holmes and Rahe life events scale, administered in the 2nd interview, was used to ascertain the occurrence of 4 kinds of events: children leaving home, ill health, death of family or friends, and changes in work. Difference in height between the peak of the graph and the height at the current age is the measurement technique used with the life graphs. Events are found to play different roles at different stages of life and seem to be measured against an implicit schedule according to which the events are seen as traumatic or acceptable. Thus, the same event has different effects on perception of emotional state according to age. Results show that anticipated events such as departure of children and change in work status have little effect on the shape of the graph. In contrast, the graph is especially fitted to exploring the impact of unanticipated large life crises and the patterned differences that occur as a result in individual outlook. (16 ref)

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