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Spirituality and Depression
Spirituality and Genetics
Spirituality and Trauma
Spirituality and The Soul
Spirituality and Positive Psychology
Spirituality and Physiology
Spirituality and Narcissism
Spirituality and Mystery
Spirituality and Mental Health
Spirituality and Medicine V
Spirituality and Medicine IV
Spirituality and Medicine III
Spirituality and Medicine II
Spirituality and Medicine I
Spirituality and Homelessness
Spirituality and Healthcare
Spirituality and Healing
Spirituality and DID
Spirituality

Psychological

and Physiological

Trauma Research

 

 

Seize Your Journeys

_______________________

Traumatic stress is found in many competent, healthy, strong, good people.  No one can completely protect themselves from traumatic experiences.  Many people have long-lasting problems following exposure to trauma.  Up to 8% of persons will have PTSD at some time in their lives. People who react to traumas are not going crazy.  What is happening to them is part of a set of common symptoms and problems that are connected with being in a traumatic situation, and thus, is a normal reaction to abnormal events and experiences.  Having symptoms after a traumatic event is NOT a sign of personal weakness.  Given exposure to a trauma that is bad enough, probably all people would develop PTSD.

By understanding trauma symptoms better, a person can become less fearful of them and better able to manage them. By recognizing the effects of trauma and knowing more about symptoms, a person will be better able to decide about getting treatment.

_______________________

 

 

 

Spirituality

 

Homelessness and Spirituality

 Record: 1

Title: Troubling experiences: Female subjectivity and fear in teaching.

Author(s): Walsh, Susan Casey, U Alberta, Canada
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities &
Social Sciences, Vol 64(7-A), 2004. pp. 2374.
Publisher: US: Univ Microfilms International

Publisher URL: http://www.il.proquest.com/umi/
ISSN: 0419-4209 (Print)
Order Number: AAINQ82177
Language: English
Keywords: female subjectivity; artistic processes; teacher
education; professional development; fear in teaching; teaching
experiences; feminist poststructuralism; feminist spirituality
Abstract: What can experiences of fear and pain show us about
subjectivity, especially female subjectivity, in the context of teaching? In what ways can artistic processes such as writing and visual art help us un-cover such experiences, search further, re-search-and ultimately resymbolize them? What insights can we derive that will inform our practices in teacher education and professional development?
The study is undertaken on at least two different levels: that of the actual writing of this text and that of a group of female teachers, including me as participant-researcher, who met over the course of a year to explore experiences of fear in teaching through writing, visual art, and conversation. In the collective, we wrote about our difficult teaching experiences, shared the writing, and responded to one another's stories through drawing, painting, sculpture, writing, and talk. The process of creating found poetry from the transcripts of the meetings functions as an interpretive practice. The writing of this text functions too as a means of interpreting what happened in the collective. Various theoretical influences such as feminist poststructuralism and feminist spirituality are interwoven. Also, various forms of writing are juxtaposed including: the found poetry from the transcripts, original poetry, expressive writing, visual images from the artwork created in the collective process, and traditional academic exposition. Through the writing process and through the collective process as methods of inquiry, the study provides useful means of resymbolizing experience and thereby of unsettling taken-for-granted ways of reading same, processes that are themselves potentially useful in teacher education and professional development. Themes that arose with regard to female subjectivity and fear in teaching include: a sense of homelessness that arises in a male-dominated symbolic, a physical experience of space that is tightly circumscribed and often perceived of as unsafe, a relational way of being that erases the individuality and separateness so valued in educational settings, and the contradictory expectations of teacher-as-role that is, at times, construed as personal inadequacy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)
Subjects: *Fear; *Feminism; *Professional Development;
*Subjectivity; *Teaching; Pain; Poetry; Teacher Education
Classification: Educational Psychology (3500)
Population: Human (10)

Female (40)
Age Group: Adulthood (18 yrs & older) (300)
Form/Content Type: Empirical Study (0800)

Journal Article (2400)
Publication Type: Dissertation Abstract (350); Print

Format(s) Available: Print
Release Date: 20040531
Accession Number: 2004-99001-036

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01-036">Troubling experiences: Female subjectivity and fear in
teaching.</A>

Database: PsycINFO
_____

Record: 2

Title: Substance Dependency among Homeless American Indians in Oakland
and Tucson.
Author(s): Lobo, Susan, Slob0333@aol.com

Vaughan, Margaret Mortensen, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, US
Source: Healing and mental health for Native Americans: Speaking in
red. Nebelkopf, Ethan (Ed); Phillips, Mary (Ed); pp. 179-190. Walnut
Creek, CA, US: AltaMira Press, 2004. x, 227 pp.
ISBN: 0-7591-0606-1 (hardcover)

0-7591-0607-X (paperback)
Language: English
Keywords: substance dependency; American Indians; homelessness;
adoption; involuntary institutionalization; coping strategies;
fostering; accident; trauma; loss; keys to survival
Abstract: (from the create) This chapter is an abridged version of
"Substance Dependency among Homeless American Indians," by Susan Lobo, Ph.D., and Margaret Mortensen Vaughan, M.A., which appeared in (Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, 2003, Vol 35[1], 63-70). (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2003-03799-011.) Extensive qualitative research in the San Francisco Bay Area in California and in Tucson, Arizona, indicates strong associations between substance abuse and homelessness among American Indians. This article takes a comparative approach to describe and analyze precipitating factors and survival patterns of those who are both homeless and who suffer from substance dependency. Possible precipitating factors presented through case studies consider the complex interaction of childhood fostering or adoption into non-Native families, different types of involuntary institutionalization during youth, and the personal impact of accident, trauma and loss. Coping strategies and keys to survival are examined, including the role of the extended family and close friendships, American Indian and mainstream organizations that offer formal and informal services, the existence of anchor or key households, the helping relationships and sobriety groups among homeless individuals, spirituality, and cultural resiliency. (PsycINFO Database Record (c)
2005 APA, all rights reserved)
Subjects: *American Indians; *Coping Behavior; *Drug Abuse;
*Foster Care; *Homeless; Accidents; Adoption (Child); Drug Dependency;
Emotional Trauma; Institutionalization
Classification: Substance Abuse & Addiction (3233)
Population: Human (10)

Male (30)

Female (40)
Location: US
Age Group: Adulthood (18 yrs & older) (300)
Form/Content Type: Empirical Study (0800)

Qualitative Study (0880)

Reprint (2000)
Intended Audience: Psychology: Professional & Research (PS)
Publication Type: Chapter (160); Print
Release Date: 20050314
Accession Number: 2005-01899-018

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and Tucson.</A>

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_____

Record: 3

Title: Substance dependency among homeless American Indians.
Author(s): Lobo, Susan, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, US

Vaughan, Margaret Mortensen, American Indian Studies, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, US
Address: Lobo, Susan, 1415 E. Prince Road, Tucson, AZ, US
Source: Journal of Psychoactive Drugs, Vol 35(1), Jan-Mar 2003. pp.
63-70.
Publisher: US: Haight-Ashbury Publications

Publisher URL: http://www.hafci.org
ISSN: 0279-1072 (Print)
Language: English
Keywords: substance dependency; American Indians; homelessness;
adoption; involuntary institutionalization; coping strategies
Abstract: Extensive qualitative research in the San Francisco Bay
Area in California and in Tucson, Arizona, indicates strong associations between substance abuse and homelessness among American Indians. This article takes a comparative approach to describe and analyze precipitating factors and survival patterns of those who are both homeless and who suffer from substance dependency. Possible precipitating factors presented through case studies consider the complex interaction of childhood fostering or adoption into non-Native families, different types of involuntary institutionalization during youth, and the personal impact of accident, trauma and loss. Coping strategies and keys to survival are examined, including the role of the extended family and close friendships, American Indian and mainstream organizations that offer formal and informal services, the existence of anchor or key households, the helping relationships and sobriety groups among homeless individuals, spirituality, and cultural resiliency.
(PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)(journal
abstract)
Subjects: *American Indians; *Coping Behavior; *Drug Abuse;
*Foster Care; *Homeless; Drug Dependency; Health Care Services;
Institutionalization
Classification: Substance Abuse & Addiction (3233)
Population: Human (10)

Male (30)

Female (40)
Location: US
Age Group: Adulthood (18 yrs & older) (300)
Form/Content Type: Empirical Study (0800)

Journal Article (2400)
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal (270); Print

Format(s) Available: Print
Release Date: 20031208
Accession Number: 2003-03799-011
Number of Citations in Source: 19

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99-011">Substance dependency among homeless American Indians.</A>

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_____

Record: 4

Title: Substance abuse, homelessness, developmental decision-making and
spirituality: A women's health issue.
Author(s): Greene, Jeanie Ahearn, U Maryland, School of Social
Work, Baltimore, MD, US

Ball, Kim, Montgomery County Homeless Families Initiative, Montgomery County Addiction Services Coordination, Rockville, MD, US

Belcher, John R., U Maryland, School of Social Work, Baltimore, MD, US

McAlpine, Catherine, Montgomery County Addiction Services Coordination, Rockville, MD, US
Address: Greene, Jeanie Ahearn, U Maryland, School of Social
Work, 525 West Redwood St, Baltimore, MD, US
Source: Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions, Vol 3(1),
2003. pp. 39-56.
Publisher: US: Haworth Press

Publisher URL: http://www.haworthpress.com
ISSN: 1533-256X (Print)
Digital Object Identifier: 10.1300/J160v03n01_04
Language: English
Keywords: spirituality; homeless women; substance abuse; moral
reasoning; social independence; moral reasoning; decision-making; childhood maltreatment; spiritual development; recovery process;
addicted women
Abstract: A qualitative methodology was used to examine the
relationship between homeless women's spirituality, substance abuse, moral reasoning and developmental decision-making. Findings indicated that a lack of development in spirituality and the ability to make decisions in childhood is related to homeless, addicted women's inability to maintain abstinence and achieve social independence.
Spirituality impacted decisions to abstain from substance abuse and increased the women's social independence. Findings suggest that treatment needs to incorporate spirituality, family of origin, and the development of skills for independent decision-making. The authors propose that childhood maltreatment, homelessness and substance abuse impede spiritual development. Therefore, substance abuse treatment needs to include a focus on spirituality and moral reasoning in the recovery process. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)(journal abstract)
Subjects: *Decision Making; *Drug Abuse; *Homeless; *Morality;
*Spirituality; Child Abuse; Drug Rehabilitation; Independence
(Personality); Reasoning
Classification: Drug & Alcohol Rehabilitation (3383)
Population: Human (10)

Female (40)
Location: US
Age Group: Adulthood (18 yrs & older) (300)

Thirties (30-39 yrs) (340)

Middle Age (40-64 yrs) (360)
Form/Content Type: Empirical Study (0800)

Journal Article (2400)
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal (270); Print

Format(s) Available: Print; Electronic
Release Date: 20030630
Accession Number: 2003-05545-009
Number of Citations in Source: 55

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href="http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=psyh&an=2003-055
45-009">Substance abuse, homelessness, developmental decision-making and
spirituality: A women's health issue.</A>

Database: PsycINFO
_____

Record: 5

Title: Substance abuse in African American women.
Author(s): Curtis-Boles, Harriet, California School of Professional
Psychology, CA, US

Jenkins-Monroe, Valata
Source: Journal of Black Psychology, Vol 26(4), Nov 2000. pp. 450-469.
Publisher: US: Sage Publications

Publisher URL: http://www.sagepublications.com/
ISSN: 0095-7984 (Print)
Language: English
Keywords: substance abuse, 21-48 yr old African American females
Abstract: Employed a combined quantitative and qualitative design
to investigate substance abuse in African American women ages 21-48 yrs.
Life experiences of women with histories of chemical dependence were compared with women who were maintaining a nonabusing lifestyle.
Variables examined were history of parental substance abuse and child abuse, exposure to racism and traumatic events, and social support and spirituality. The substance abusing and nonabusing women were distinguished from each other in the areas of spirituality and family connectedness. Although all Ss reported high violence exposure and personal losses, significantly more substance abusing women reported being battered, experiencing homelessness, and more traumatic events. Ss described multiple experiences with racism, though their descriptions of their responses to these experiences suggested different styles of coping. The authors contend that findings have significant implications for prevention of substance abuse, particularly in the areas of religious involvement family support, and the development of active problem-solving strategies. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)
Subjects: *Blacks; *Drug Abuse; *Human Females
Classification: Substance Abuse & Addiction (3233)
Population: Human (10)

Female (40)
Age Group: Adulthood (18 yrs & older) (300)

Young Adulthood (18-29 yrs) (320)

Thirties (30-39 yrs) (340)

Middle Age (40-64 yrs) (360)
Form/Content Type: Empirical Study (0800)
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal (270); Print
Release Date: 20001129
Accession Number: 2000-16285-006

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85-006">Substance abuse in African American women.</A>

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Record: 6

Title: A home-based family intervention for ethnic minorities with a
mentally ill member.
Author(s): Connery, Linda, Barbour & Floyd ISA, Compton, CA, US

Brekke, John
Source: Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, Vol 17(1-2), 1999. pp. 149-167.

Journal URL: http://www.haworthpressinc.com/store/product.asp?sku=J020
Publisher: US: Haworth Press

Publisher URL: http://www.haworthpress.com
ISSN: 0734-7324 (Print)
Language: English
Keywords: home-based family intervention program outcomes, low-SES
African Americans & Latinos caring for family member with mental
disorders
Abstract: Presents the background, development, and content of a
manualized home-based family intervention for ethnic minority families with a seriously mentally ill member. The development of this homelessness prevention intervention is based on the premise that the client's home can be one of the most effective venues for achieving long-term positive outcomes from mental health services. By observing the patient within the context of the home environment, staff can more accurately assess the family dynamics and encourage family members to fulfill more effective roles as caregivers. Through effective case management and other interventions, the Integrated Services Agency has been able to change the service utilization pattern from in-patient care, homelessness, and incarceration to community treatment within the framework of integrated comprehensive services. Ten salient points which have been significant to this agency's positive outcomes are discussed.
We also provide a model for conceptualizing the strengths and burdens of the study population of low-SES African Americans and Latinos. We identified the strengths as the extended family, the kinship network, the church and spirituality, and strong education and work ethics.
(PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)
Subjects: *Home Care; *Homeless; *Integrated Services; *Mental
Disorders; *Prevention; Blacks; Caregivers; Family Intervention; Family
Members; Hispanics; Home Environment; Lower Income Level
Classification: Health & Mental Health Services (3370)
Population: Human (10)

Male (30)

Female (40)
Location: US
Age Group: Adulthood (18 yrs & older) (300)
Form/Content Type: Empirical Study (0800)

Program Evaluation (1900)
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal (270); Print
Release Date: 19991101
Accession Number: 1999-11350-009

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50-009">A home-based family intervention for ethnic minorities with a
mentally ill member.</A>

Database: PsycINFO
_____

Record: 7

Title: Stability in housing after periods of homelessness.
Author(s): Weyerhaeuser, Merrill, The Wright Inst, US
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences &
Engineering, Vol 58(4-B), Oct 1997. pp. 2145.
Publisher: US: Univ Microfilms International

Publisher URL: http://www.il.proquest.com/umi/
ISSN: 0419-4217 (Print)
Order Number: AAM9728842
Language: English
Keywords: stability in housing after periods of homelessness,
53-67 yr olds
Abstract: This qualitative study explores the factors which
contributed to stability in housing for 12 elderly people who had been homeless in Portland, Oregon. Semi-structured interviews with each of the participants were audio-taped and then transcribed. An analysis based on Grounded Theory was used to generate theories about what facilitates one's managing to seek, find, and stabilize in housing. At the time of the study all of the participants were living in a subsidized apartment building. The length of tenancy varied from 2 months to 3 years at the time of the interview. They were assisted in finding their housing through Northwest Pilot Project, an agency serving elderly people. The age range of the participants was 53 to 67 years. In keeping with the tenets of Grounded Theory, the sample was selected for diversity in terms of race, gender, disability, length of time homeless, age when first homeless, history of drug and alcohol use and treatment, and history and treatment of psychiatric difficulties. The following categories emerged given the responses of the participants: Ways of Managing, Defining Experiences, and Perceptions of How People Become Homeless. Subcategories for Ways of Managing included Self-Reliance, Reliance on Others, Use of Services, and the Role of Faith and Spirituality. Defining Experiences included Early Childhood Events, Adult Experiences, Work Experiences and Skills, and Health and Aging.
Perceptions of How People Become Homeless included Lack of Affordable Housing, Impact of Funding Cutbacks on Provision of Social Services, and Personal Style. The philosophical basis for the study was the importance of understanding and building upon successes of individuals, as well as organizations. This population was selected given the unique needs of people who are in the later stages of their lives and the remarkable stability in housing which follows, in some cases, lengthy periods of being homeless. Plausible explanations for the success these participants have had in maintaining housing include: (a) determination to take care of one's physical needs; (b) comprehensive and accessible services for this age bracket; and (c) quality and nature of service provision. It was hypothesized that these factors combined to make dramatic changes for the participants involved. The agency's ongoing presence in the apartment building may provide a cost-effective means of providing necessary support as one makes a transition into housing. This feature of agency may have implications for service provision for people of all ages who are homeless and are seeking housing. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)
Subjects: *Homeless; *Housing
Classification: Health & Mental Health Treatment & Prevention (3300)
Population: Human (10)
Location: US
Age Group: Adulthood (18 yrs & older) (300)

Middle Age (40-64 yrs) (360)

Aged (65 yrs & older) (380)
Form/Content Type: Empirical Study (0800)
Publication Type: Dissertation Abstract (350); Print
Release Date: 19970101
Accession Number: 1997-95020-098

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20-098">Stability in housing after periods of homelessness.</A>

Database: PsycINFO
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Record: 8

Title: Coping and adaptation in women with AIDS.
Author(s): Van Loon, Ruth Anne, U Chicago, US
Source: Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities &
Social Sciences, Vol 57(11-A), May 1997. pp. 4933.
Publisher: US: Univ Microfilms International

Publisher URL: http://www.il.proquest.com/umi/
ISSN: 0419-4209 (Print)
Order Number: AAM9711233
Language: English
Keywords: coping & adaptation & self-assessments of health &
management of illness & associated problems, women with AIDS
Abstract: The experiences of disadvantaged women with AIDS were
examined in an exploratory study (n = 12) which used multiple in-depth interviews and qualitative data analysis methods. Taylor's cognitive theory of adaptation to life-threatening events provided a frame of reference to explore the ways women understood and made meaning of HIV illness, their efforts at managing the illness and associated problems, and self-assessments of health, coping, and adaptation. Participants'
understanding of HIV illness evolved as they compared their own and others' experiences to information provided by professionals. Resulting contradictions prompted a process of self-education, which empowered some women to take control of their medical treatment and confused other women who were unable to reconcile discrepant information. The women developed beliefs about HIV/AIDS which functioned to destigmatize it and reframed the experience of HIV infection to promote feelings of personal control. AIDS prompted self-examination, and many believed they had made positive change, especially women who found purpose in life through helping others and women who entered recovery. AIDS often produced upsetting emotions, and over half the participants experienced episodes of significant and generally untreated depression. In coping with emotional distress, the women used a variety of cognitive and behavioral strategies and relied upon spirituality and support from their children and others with AIDS. They used common sense measures to manage the illness and promote health and considered these effective, even while they believed they ultimately had no control over disease progression and death. The majority rated their health as good and compared themselves favorably to other women with AIDS. They believed they coped well with AIDS and that their overall adaptation was good. Threats to self-confidence were identified, however. Considering others in later stages of AIDS who were well-known to them resulted in identification and fears about their future, rather than favorable comparisons.
Thinking about the future in general was avoided, as this raised fears of being alone, disability, and homelessness. The subject of death was less troubling, as the women had developed philosophical and religious beliefs which alleviated fear. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)
Subjects: *Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; *Adjustment;
*Coping Behavior; *Illness Behavior; *Self Evaluation; Health Behavior
Classification: Health & Mental Health Treatment & Prevention (3300)

General Psychology (2100)
Population: Human (10)

Female (40)
Age Group: Adulthood (18 yrs & older) (300)
Form/Content Type: Empirical Study (0800)
Publication Type: Dissertation Abstract (350); Print
Release Date: 19970101
Accession Number: 1997-95009-021

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Record: 9

Title: Community building: Values for a sustainable future.
Author(s): Jason, Leonard A., De Paul U, Chicago, IL, US
Source: Westport, CT, US: Praeger Publishers/Greenwood Publishing Group,
Inc, 1997. xx, 155 pp.
ISBN: 0-275-95872-8 (hardcover)
Language: English
Keywords: vulnerabilities that account for social problems in
contemporary society & psychological sense of community & applications
of community psychology to & alternative models for community building
Abstract: (from the book) The author describes a series of
vulnerabilities that help account for many of the serious problems facing contemporary society in industrialized countries, including high crime rates; homelessness; alcohol, tobacco, and other drug addictions; and a pervasive sense of isolation and alienation. These vulnerabilities are aggressive tendencies in our genetic makeup; our separation from nature; loss of external moral and religious symbols and guideposts; and loss of connection with the land, crafts, and communities. These vulnerabilities predispose industrialized societies to unacceptable levels of individualism and a breakdown of the psychological sense of community.

The author explores anthropological, historical, philosophical, religious, and epistemological explanations for the decline in sense of community and the subsequent emphasis on individual goals as a source of meaning. Implications for US society are highlighted, and possible alternative models for healing our problems are reviewed. These models are illustrated in the final chapters with examples of healing communities and community-based interventions. Applications of community psychology to community building are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)
Subjects: *Communities; *Community Development; *Community
Psychology; *Social Issues; Society
Classification: Social Psychology (3000)
Population: Human (10)
Intended Audience: Psychology: Professional & Research (PS)
Publication Type: Authored Book (120); Print
Release Date: 19970101
Accession Number: 1997-30243-000

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43-000">Community building: Values for a sustainable future.</A>

Database: PsycINFO
_____

Record: 10

Title: Sexual abuse in the lives of women diagnosed with serious mental
illness.
Series Title: New directions in therapeutic interventions; Vol. 2
Author(s): Harris, Maxine, (Ed), Community Connections, Inc,
Washington, DC, US

Landis, Christine L., (Ed)
Source: Amsterdam, Netherlands: Harwood Academic Publishers, 1997. xix,
391 pp.
ISBN: 90-5702-505-1 (paperback)
Language: English
Keywords: theories & assessment & treatment & personal accounts of
& policy & research & special issues in sexual abuse, females diagnosed
with serious mental illness
Abstract: (from the cover) Although a substantial amount of media
and professional attention has been devoted to the incidence of sexual abuse in the population at large, the plight of those who have suffered abuse and are seriously mentally ill has largely been ignored. Divided into various parts, this important and distinctive work offers chapters on theory and assessment of the abused women, including the services that are available and recommendations for improvement; treatment, including inpatient treatment and cognitive-behavioral approaches; and policy and research, which deals with the prevalence and impact of physical and emotional abuse on severely mentally ill women. There is also a section devoted to case studies.

The material is intended for clinicians, policymakers, and researchers, as well as the interested lay-reader. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)
Subjects: *Human Females; *Mental Disorders; *Sexual Abuse;
*Victimization; Experimentation; Psychodiagnosis; Theories; Treatment;
Health Care Policy
Classification: Psychological & Physical Disorders (3200)
Population: Human (10)

Female (40)
Intended Audience: Psychology: Professional & Research (PS)
Publication Type: Edited Book (140); Print
Release Date: 19980501
Accession Number: 1998-07035-000

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illness.</A>

Database: PsycINFO
 

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